Articles

Lundin, John W. & Lundin, Stephen J. "Cornell's Influence on Washington and West Coast Rowing." Seattle, 2004 Friends of Rowing History.

This article explains the influence that Cornell had on Washington's rowing program, West Coast rowing, and the nation's college rowing programs. In the process, the Poughkeepsie Regatta race between Cornell, Yale, and Harvard of 1897 is described in detail, including its importance to the crews, and the excitement for the spectators. The Regatta is also mentioned later in the article, demonstrating its importance to Washington.

Mylod, Frank V. 2003. "The Regatta: As I Remember." Dutchess County Historical Society Year Book. Vol. 83, 2001-2002. Dutchess County Historical Society.

This is a segment of an article entitled "As I Remember" by Frank Mylod. He gives a brief history of the Regatta, and then discusses his own memories of watching the event. It provides an excellent example of the Regatta from the spectators' point of view. He focuses on the atmosphere, the colors, the noise, and the excitement. He briefly discusses Regatta Row, the colleges that attended, the best places to view the race, and how the winner was announced to the crowd. He also covers why the Regatta eventually left Poughkeepsie.

Books

Dodd, Christopher. 1992. The Story of World Rowing. London: Stanley Paul.

This book gives the history of world rowing, and the Poughkeepsie Regatta is mentioned, and the importance of the Poughkeepsie Regatta is briefly discussed.

Jeanneney, John & Mary L. Jeanneney. 1983. Dutchess County: A Pictorial History. Norfolk: The Donning Co.

This book only mentions the Regatta very briefly. It gives a synopsis of the history of the Regatta and how popular it was. There are two pictures.

Keller, Allan. 1976. Life Along The Hudson. Tarrytown: Sleepy Hollow Restorations Inc.

This book discusses the history of the Hudson River in terms of the events that were held around, and what could be seen along the river at various points in the past. The author briefly discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta, focusing on the excitement of the event for the spectators. He also talks in brief about the 1929 Regatta where more than 50% of the crews' boats were sunk because of rough water.

Lemmon, Jim. 1989. The Log Of Rowing At The University Of California Berkeley 1870-1987. Berkeley: Western Heritage Press.

This book gives an account of the history of crew at the University of California Berkeley. California was a major participant in the Poughkeepsie Regatta for many years, so the Regatta is often mentioned in the book relating what places California and their rivals finished in the Regatta, as well as the occasional story going into greater detail about a particular Poughkeepsie race.

Look, Margaret K. 1989. Courtney: Master Oarsmen – Champion Coach. Interlaken: Heart of Lakes Publishing.

This book describes the life of Charles Courtney during his years of being a professional oarsman, to his transition of becoming the famous coach of the Cornell Navy. The Poughkeepsie Regatta is repeatedly mentioned in the chapters that describe Courtney's coaching years. The effect that Courtney had on the Regatta is also mentioned, for example the book talks about how Courtney repeatedly discouraged coaches from keeping their crews' practices and times a secret, because this, in turn, discouraged people from betting on the races, a practice that Courtney wanted to abolish.

Mabee, Carleton. 2001. Bridging the Hudson: the Poughkeepsie Railroad Bridge and its Connecting Rail Lines, A Many Faceted History. Fleischmanns: Purple Mountain Press.

This book covers the history of the Poughkeepsie Railroad Bridge. There is a chapter in the book about the Poughkeepsie Regatta and the role that the Poughkeepsie Railroad Bridge played in the Regatta. The chapter gives a history of the Poughkeepsie Regatta and goes into more detail about the role that the bridge played. For example there would be signalmen on the bridge to signal through various methods, such as flags, to the viewers who was in the lead, and then who won the race as well.

Mendenhall, Thomas Corwin. 1980. A Short History of American Rowing. Boston: Charles River Books.

This book gives a brief history of all of American rowing. The Poughkeepsie Regatta is mentioned as the national regatta and is briefly gone over. The book also gives the results of the IRA from 1895-1979.

Newell, Gordon. 1987. Ready All! George Yeoman Pocock and Crew Racing. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

This book relates the history of George Pocock, a major contributor to crew racing, as well as an expert shell builder. Scattered throughout the book there are a few stories about his time in Poughkeepsie for the Regatta where he usually accompanied the Washington crew team. One story gives an example of how Poughkeepsie struggled to give adequate housing to the incoming crew teams. One year the Washington crew team was housed in a broken down house that had one bed, which, it was discovered in the morning, was inhabited by bedbugs. Needless to say the crew moved to other housing the next day.

Poughkeepsie Journal. 2000. The Hudson Valley: Our Heritage, Our Future. Poughkeepsie Newspapers.

This book very briefly mentions the Poughkeepsie Regatta by displaying three photographs of the Poughkeepsie Regatta and giving brief descriptions of what the picture is displaying in the captions.

Young, C.V.P. 1907. The Cornell Navy: A Review. Ithaca: Taylor and Carpenter.

This book relates the founding of the Cornell navy, through the year of 1907. The Poughkeepsie Regatta is mentioned on several occasions in the book due to Cornell's extensive participation and success in the race.

Newspapers

"3 California Oarsmen to Row For Fourth Time on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 5, 1929; Page 166.

This article reveals that three of the members of California's crew team are going to compete on the Hudson for the fourth year in a row.

"3 Columbia Crews To Row on Hudson/ Varsity, Jayvee and Freshman Eights to Race at Poughkeepsie on June 16." New York TIMES, March 29, 1934; Page 31, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Columbia University will definitely be sending three crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. Because of this assurance, it is now almost certain that there will be a freshman race this year. It was considered doubtful whether the freshman would be able to race or not since many of the normal heavy contenders will only be sending one or two teams to the Regatta this year, but Columbia's participation almost assures the existence of the freshman race.

"3 Husky Eights To Row/ Washington Freshmen Added to Poughkeepsie Race Entries." New York TIMES, May 30, 1947; Page 17, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington will be sending all three of their crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. Their Faculty Athletic Committee voted to send the Freshmen crew after they beat California's freshmen crew by five lengths.

"3 Miles Of Crowd See Crew Classic/ Spectators in 34 Observation Cars, Pack Yachts and Boats and Line Both Sides of Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1924; Page 15.

This article details what it was like for the spectators to watch the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as how many spectators their were and the different ways they watched the race.

"3 More Stations Offer Television/ Two at Present Will Radiate Animated Silhouette Movies From Films/ To Broadcast Boat Race/ Reports of the Regatta at Poughkeepsie Today to Be Sent Out Over Network." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1929; Page 28.

This article reveals that three new television stations are going to broadcast still photos of the Intercollegiate Regatta on TV. They are hopeful in the future that the technology will be available to broadcast live shots.

"4 Columbia Crews Go Through Paces/ Varsity Braves Rough Water in Four-Mile Workout on the Hudson/ Navy's Shells Arrive/ Two Sub Chasers Bring Racing Craft – Annapolis Oarsmen Will Take Up Quarters Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1927; Page S5.

This article reports what the conditions were like on the Hudson today for practice, as well as the fact that Navy's shells have arrived, with the oarsmen expected to arrive tomorrow. It also details the practices of Columbia's Jayvee crew, and how they are doing.

"6 Crews On Hudson Hold Time Trials/ Cornell, Penn, Syracuse, Navy, Columbia and Wisconsin Stage Last Hard Drill." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1929; Page 20.

This article announces that six of the nine crews participating in the Regatta went out for time trials today, and it also briefly gives reasons for why the other three crews did not participate.

"7 Coast Oarsmen Are On Sick List/ Luft, No. 4 in Varsity Shell, Goes to Hospital – Typhoid Fever Is Feared/ Five Others Have Boils/ Gill of Junior Varsity Out With Severe Cold – Columbia Shows More Speed – Penn Has Easy Day." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1924; Page 7.

This article reveals the unfortunate news that one of the Washington crew members has been taken to the hospital where doctors fear he has typhoid fever, and six other men are stricken with boils. The article briefly states what the other crews have been doing for practice.

"7 Freshmen Crews To Row On Hudson/ Entry of Navy and Wisconsin Makes Record Yearling Total for Regatta/ 7 In Varsity Race Also/ Penn Draws 'Lucky' No. 2 Lane, While Washington Gets No. 3 – Jayvees Event Attracts 5 Eights. ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 25, 1927; Page 21.

This article announces the number of crews that will be participating in the Regatta, who they are, and what lanes they drew.

"8 Crews Will Row At Poughkeepsie/ With Titular Washington Eight in Line, Entry Expected to Equal Record/ Princeton Not Competing/ California Counted Upon to Row in the Hudson Classic, Chairman Stevenson Says." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 16, 1927; Page 22.

This article announces that the University of Washington is definitely entered into the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and it announces the other crews that are going to participate.

"11 Varsity Crews In Hudson Regatta/ Washington and California in Record Poughkeepsie Entry for Race on June 21." New York TIMES, May 22, 1947; Page 36, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that a record breaking eleven crews will be participating in the Varsity race at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The highest number of crews prior to this year was nine. In addition, the varsity race will be three miles this year, instead of the traditional four. The Board of Stewards is still deciding where to put the finish marker

"12-Race Streak Broken/ Navy Stops Run of Coast Varsity, Jayvee and Cub Crews." New York TIMES, June 28, 1938; Page 13, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York

This article announces that by winning the Regatta this year, Navy finally put a stop to the reign of the western crews at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Between Washington and California, the western crews won 12 races in a row, including Varsity, Jayvee, and freshmen races.

"17 Crews To Row At Poughkeepsie/ Seven, Including Washington and Wisconsin, Enter Varsity Race, Final Entries Show/ Navy Returns To Classic/ But Experts Predict That Coast Eight Will Be Favorite – Contest Will Be at Four Miles." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 7, 1925; Page 14.

This article lists what schools will be participating in which races for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"18 Miles Covered By Columbia Crew/ Stevenson and Benson Watch Workouts – No Shifts Made in Varsity Boat." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1962; Page 10.

This article describes the practice routines the crews on the Hudson are undergoing, focusing on Columbia.

"19 Crews Entered For Poughkeepsie/ Addition of California's Junior Varsity Boosts Record Total for Classic/ One More Is Expected/ Wisconsin's Entry in Freshmen Race Awaited – Regatta Observation Train to Number 34 Coaches." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times, May 25, 1926; Page 33.

This article lists the crews that are expected to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. If all the crews that are expected to participate sign up there will be record number of crews on the Hudson.

"20th Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1914; Page 11.

This article acts as a program for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, it tells where the course is located, the times of all the races as well as the members of all the crews and the positions they are rowing in, and what times the train and boat service is running.

"23 crews row today in Hudson Regatta/ Record fleet from 9 colleges in Championship races on River at Poughkeepsie/ 100,000 to see Classic/ Navy and Washington rule favorites in varsity with Columbia and California next/ Middie substitutes win/ Score over California four-oared shell/ Washington Eight spurts to Beat Syracuse." New York TIMES, June 26, 1930; Page 19; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article gives an account of what the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be like this year, who is favored to win, and how the crews are gearing up for the Championship.

"150-Pound Crew Out/ Penn's Entry for This Race at Poughkeepsie is Withdrawn." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1922; Page 26

Because of the lack of entries in the event, Pennsylvania will not be bringing a 150-pound crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta

"50,000 Cheer Byrd in Albany Greeting/ Greet Navy Oarsmen." New York TIMES, June 25, 1930; Page 15, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces how Admiral Byrd was traveling through New York, and the destroyer that he was on sailed the Hudson River and pulled up opposite the Navy boathouse, and the Admiral greeted the Navy crew teams and wished them luck.

"50,000 To Witness Crew Races Today/ Poughkeepsie Expects Record Crowd for Intercollegiate Regatta on Hudson/ Fifteen Eights Are Ready/ Take Final Spins for Varsity, Junior Varsity and Freshman Aquatic Battles/ Navy Varsity Favorite/ Stroke Walling, With Bandaged Knee, Back in Washington Boat – Columbia Hopeful." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1923; Page 13

Tomorrow is the big day and a huge crowd is expected in Poughkeepsie. Walling is going to be stroking for the Washington crew, although he has been severely weakened by his injured knee. There is much speculation about how Washington, Cornell, and all the other crews will perform

"Act To Join Hudson Race/ Princeton Oarsmen Petition for Entry at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, December 19, 1938; Page 27, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that many crew members at Princeton have petitioned their university council on athletics for permission to enter the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Active Season Due In College Rowing/ Program of Events for Leading Crews Is Longest in History of the Sport." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 3, 1921; Page 20.

The date of the Poughkeepsie Regatta will remain in doubt until the Board of Stewards meet sometime later this month.

"Add A Mile To Race For Crews On Hudson/ Junior Varsity Event Will Be at Three Miles at Poughkeepsie This Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 6, 1926; Page 11.

This article announces that the junior varsity race will be lengthened from two miles to three miles.

"All 2,700 Poughkeepsie Regatta Tickets Sold; Demands at Columbia Alone Reached 30,000." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1929; Page 28.

This article announces that all of the tickets for the observation train have been sold out, and there was such a high demand that they easily could have sold tens of thousands more.

"All In Readiness For Big Regatta/ Crews Regarded as Nearly Equal in Power as Stage Is Set For Race Tomorrow." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1916; Page 14.

This article talks about the last minute preparations for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, how the crews are faring, what activities they're up to, and the preparations that the town has done.

"All The Crews Out/ Freshmen and 'Varsity Eights Practice on the Poughkeepsie Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1896; Page 6.

Gives a brief description of the practices that crews participated in today.

"Alumni Favor Hudson/ Saratoga Course Not Desirable For College Regattas/ College Politics Interfering with the Choice of the Best Course for the Oarsmen – Rough Water Has Delayed Many College Races on Saratoga Lake – The Bill to Secure an Unobstructed Lane at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 4, 1896; Page 3.

This article discusses a bill that is currently before the House of Representatives. If passed, it will give the Secretary of the Treasury the right to send out boats to police the course of any amateur or professional races on navigable waters. If the bill is passed, the last remaining objection to the Poughkeepsie course will be removed and the race will most likely be held there.

"Arranging for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 6, 1902; Page 10.

This article mentions that two members of the Poughkeepsie Highland Amateur Rowing Association traveled to Poughkeepsie and were led over the course the rowers would take. All the boathouses were inspected and found acceptable, and it was decided that the meeting point for all crews before each race would be at the icehouse at the one-mile marker.

"Article 8 – No Title." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 12, 1924; Page 23.

This article reveals that Cornell has requested to be housed on the Poughkeepsie side of the river, and their request will be granted.

"Ask 7 Outside Crews To Poughkeepsie/ Stanford, California, Washington, Wisconsin Princeton, M.I.T, and Navy are Invited." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 24, 1928; Page 33.

This article lists the seven colleges that have been invited to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Athletic News of the Colleges." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 20, 1916; Page 7.

This article reveals that Stanford has been invited to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta and they have accepted.

"Attack On Orange Oarsmen Resented/ Graduate Manager of Athletics at Syracuse Makes Formal Denial of Charges/ Duluth Men In Question/ N.S. Smith Says None of Them Ever Sat in a Shell Until Spring Before Entering College." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 31, 1916; Page E7.

This article discusses the controversy of Syracuse possibly not being invited to the Regatta next year because the Stewards believe some of their members violate the eligibility qualifications. Specifically that some of their members had rowed for a boat club prior to rowing for Syracuse. Syracuse is denying this and is very upset over the allegations and the possible rejection to the Regatta.

"Bad Weather For Crews/ Light Practice for Most of the Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie/ Hanlan Satisfied With His Men – Fast Row for Cornell – Quaker Freshmen Boat Weakened." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1903; Page 6.

This article discusses how the weather is impeding the practices of the crews participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Bad Weather Halts Oarsmen On Hudson/ Crews at Poughkeepsie Get Little Real Work – Columbia's New Shell Goes Well." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1922; Page 29.

There was very bad weather in Poughkeepsie today, and although all the crews tried to practice, they all eventually gave up after short runs. Columbia had the longest practice in their new boat, which held up very well, but even they still had to turn in.

"Badger Faculty Approves/ Will Permit Wisconsin Crew to Return to Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 9, 1923; Page 17.

The faculty committee at Wisconsin officially approved sending Wisconsin to the Poughkeepsie Regatta again next year, so long as an adequate eight can be formed.

"Badgers Are Sent Over 4-Mile Trip/ Are Clocked on Dead Water at Poughkeepsie in More Than 21 Minutes/ Navy Rows A Fast Mile/ Catching Tide Coming in Registers 4:44 at 33 Beat – Coast Crews in Short Drill." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1925; Page 18.

This article reports a few time trials from some of the crews, as well as updates and outlooks for the crews participating in the Regatta this year.

"Badgers Hard At Work/ Wisconsin Coach Pointing Crew for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 24, 1924; Page 12.

This article briefly states that the Badgers coach is preparing his crews for the Poughkeepsie Regatta which they have not entered in quite some time.

"Badgers In Spins On Hudson Course/ Coach Vail Gives His Wisconsin Crews Their First Workouts at Poughkeepsie/ Columbia Worries Haines/ Mentor Apparently Not Satisfied With Recovery From Strokes – Penn Has Secret Time Trial." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1925; Page 19.

This article describes the practice that the Wisconsin crews undertook to prepare for the Regatta, as well as briefly mentioning what the other crews on the Hudson did for practice.

"Badgers May Come To Hudson Regatta/ Wisconsin Students Ask Faculty to Remove Ban on Rowing – For Three-Mile Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 27, 1914; Page S2.

This article reveals that the Wisconsin crew members have petitioned the faculty to allow them to row in the Poughkeepsie Regatta again. They claim that the race won't be too strenuous anymore because it will most likely be shortened to three miles, and they also claim that the medical statement saying that rowing was detrimental to ones health is false.

"Badgers To Return For 1924 Regatta/ Wisconsin Crew Will Row at Poughkeepsie for First Time Since 1915." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 27, 1923; Page 14.

Next year Wisconsin will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta again, for the first time since 1915.

"Badgers To Send 2 Crews/ Wisconsin Varsity and Freshmen Will Row at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, June 3, 1939; Page 19, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Wisconsin will be sending a Varsity and a Freshman squad to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Battle Royal In College Regatta/ Columbia, Syracuse, and Penn Equal Favorites for Poughkeepsie Varsity Race/ Betting Brisk on Result/ Courtney Sees No Chance for Cornell – Freshmen and Fours Promise Interesting Contests." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 27, 1908; Page 7.

This article discusses the race that will be held the next day, the betting odds, and who the favorites are.

"Best Routes To Hudson Boat Races Outlined/ Bureau of Tours of Automobile Club Tells How to Reach Poughkeepsie Regatta from Several Points – Some Detours Are Required." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1915; Page XXII.

This article lists the different ways spectators can make their way to Poughkeepsie to watch the Regatta.

"Big Race For Rutgers/ Writer Suggests Crew Be Invited to Poughkeepsie Regatta." New York TIMES, May 3, 1941; Page 12, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is a letter to the editor where the reader asks how schools receive invitations to the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The reader believes that this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta can hardly be considered a top rowing event if Rutgers is not invited to join the Poughkeepsie Regatta. He lists Rutgers accomplishments this rowing season, which are substantial, and suggests that Rutgers might be the east's shot at defeating the West this year.

"Big Regatta Crowd Drenched By Rain/ Spirits of 50,000 Who Line the Poughkeepsie Course are Undaunted By Downfall." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1923; Page 12.

Despite the rain and bad weather there was a huge crowd at Poughkeepsie that cheered on their favorite crews just as loudly as if the sun were shining.

"Big Regatta To Be Rowed On June 28/ Races Probably Will Go to Poughkeepsie, Although No Decision Is Reached/ Four-Mile Event Likely/ Stewards Undoubtedly Will Accept Longer Distance at Meeting Here on Feb. 15." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 20, 1923; Page 11.

The Board of Stewards met and decided the Regatta will be rowed on June 28th, but no decision was announced about where the Regatta will be held, and what distance the varsity event will be rowed at, although there is speculation on both points.

"Big Season Ahead In College Rowing/ Intercollegiate Regatta Expected to Have Many Entries, Including Crews From West/ First Skirmish April 9/ Childs Cup Race and Yale-Harvard Meeting Other Events That Are Arousing Interest This Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 20, 1921; Page S3.

It is expected to be a big season of rowing, in all of scheduled races. Although there is still some question over where the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held, it is the general consensus that it will return to Poughkeepsie. It is also expected to have a much larger group of schools participating.

Bird, Robert S., "Fair Finds Crowds Growing Steadily/ Throng Out to Enjoy Brisk Day is Second Biggest for a Thursday This Year/ Washington Day Marked/ Mrs. Roosevelt Pays a Visit to Exposition and Inspects New York State Exhibit." New York TIMES, June 21, 1940; Page 24, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article mentions in it that the University of Washington received the trophy for winning the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Boat Chartered by Columbia Alumni Body; Will Anchor Near Finish Line of Crew Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1929; Page 28.

This article announces that the Columbia Alumni Association chartered a boat for all Columbia alumni and family to watch the Poughkeepsie Regatta from. The boat will be anchored near the finish line.

"The Boat Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1897; Page 6.

This article discusses the triumph of the Cornell crew, despite the fact that all of the experts were in agreement that they would most definitely finish last.

"Boat Races Postponed/ Strong Wind Prevents the Freshman and 'Varsity Crews from Rowing at Saratoga/ Contests Set For To-Day/ A Disappointed Crowd of 3,000 Hoots and Jeers the Referee When Announcement of the Postponement Is Made." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 2, 1898; Page 4.

The referees postponed the freshmen and 'varsity races due to the weather, and after waiting all day, the crowd was very disappointed to find out that the races had been postponed.

"Bombs Will Indicate Poughkeepsie Victors/ Flags Also to Aid Spectators in Learning Results of Races in Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1926; Page 16.

This article reveals that to announce which schools pass under the Poughkeepsie bridge first, as well as who wins each race, bombs will be set off. In addition, flags will be hung from the bridge to let people know who finishes in what order.

"Breezes Curtail Work On Hudson/ Washington and Syracuse, on Water Early, Only Crews to Row in Morning/ Columbia Is Forced Back/ Navy and Wisconsin Also Easy Spins, but Quit Against High Waves – Oarsmen Out in Evening." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1926; Page 16.

This article discusses the weather which has again effected the practices of the crews, and the worries of the coaches.

"Burke Decries Action/ President of National Rowing Body Lauds Stevenson's Efforts." New York TIMES, June 13, 1933; Page 20, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

Henry Burke, President of the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen criticized the board of Stewards for calling off the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, however he applauded Maxwell Stevenson and the fight he put up to keep the Regatta maintained. Rusty Callow, head coach of the Penn Varsity crew team admitted that it was probably best that the Regatta was cancelled this year, but he expressed concern that it would be difficult to build the Regatta back up to its former glory with this year off.

"Busy Week For College Oarsmen/ Fifteen Crews at Poughkeepsie Preparing For the Big Racing Day on Friday – Cornell is the Favorite in all Three Events – Yale Chances Brighter at New London, but Harvard Freshmen Appear Stronger Than New Haven's Boat." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1903; Page 10.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta that is coming up, what the crews are doing to prepare for it, the boating lineup and the crew positions.

"California Coach Praises His Crew/ 'The Boys Obeyed Instructions Explicitly,' Ebright Asserts After the Race." New York TIMES, June 21, 1932; Page 29, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article features statements made by California's coach praising his Varsity crew team for their performance today. It also has statements made by the other teams' coaches, applauding the job done by the California 8. Many of the coaches predicted that California would triumph at the Olympics this year.

"California Coach Praises New Poughkeepsie Race Lanes." New York TIMES, January 28 1932; Page 26, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article displays remarks made by Ky Ebright, the head coach for California, praising the stewards' decision to have all crews race in the middle of the river in order to even the rowing conditions. He felt that this would give all teams an equal chance, which they had not had in the past. He also announced that his varsity crew would be staying a week longer in Poughkeepsie in order to train for the Olympic trials.

"California Crew Arrives." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1921; Page 24.

The California crews have arrived, and their coach is expected to take them on their first practice tomorrow when he arrives.

"California Crew Rows Fast Trial/Covers Four Miles in 19:21, Bettered Only in 3 Races – Others Drill on Hudson." New York TIMES, June 14, 1936; Section 5, Page 3, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reports the results of California's time trial. The bears rowed the course in 19:21, which beats California's own best time. The article goes on to mention that there has only been three instances since the Regatta began when the winning team beat its own time. Other crews performed time trials today, such as Syracuse, and gave a good showing.

"California Crews Arrive/ 36 Oarsmen Practice on Hudson After Occupying Camp." New York TIMES, June 8, 1939; Page 33, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California arrived on the Hudson today, and they immediately went on the river for a short practice. They are the second crew to arrive on the river this year, Columbia having arrived a week ago.

"California Crews Coming East." New York TIMES, May 1, 1941; Page 30, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California will be coming east to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. It was voted unanimously by the executive committee of Associated Students to give the crews funds so they could make the journey.

"California Crews Coming/ Two Will Row at Poughkeepsie – Netmen to Play in East." New York TIMES, May 1, 1937; Page 14, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that The University of California will be sending their Varsity and freshmen squads to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and on the way to the Regatta they will stop to race the University of Wisconsin crew team.

"California Crews Named By Ebright/ Coach Settles on Boatings for 3 Eights – Weather Still Handicaps Oarsmen on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1926; Page 9.

This article details a few changes that the California coach has made to his crews, as well as how the weather has been effecting the crews on the Hudson and their practice schedules.

"California Crews Row In Afternoon/ Only Ones at Poughkeepsie to Get Out, but Their Drill Is Short/ Washington Is Due Today/ Wisconsin Freshmen Eight Also to Arrive – Rain Mars Outing of Penn Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1927; Page 17.

This article describes this day of practice for the crews on the Hudson where California was the only school to get in any practice. Washington, Wisconsin, and Navy are all supposed to arrive on the river.

"California Eight Finishes In Front/ Outrows University of Washington by Five Feet – Will Come East to Compete." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 10, 1921; Page 98.

California will be coming east because they beat Washington in their annual regatta.

"California Eight Holds Time Trial/ Varsity Rows 4-Mile Hudson Course in 21:20, Far Behind Its Own Record/ Beutell Rejoins Cornell/ Takes Old Seat in Big Shell – Columbia and Others Hold Routine Workouts." New York TIMES, June 17, 1937; Page 31, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the day's workouts for all crews that practiced today on the Hudson. All crews had some sort of workout. California was the only crew that had a time trial today, and their time was far below their own personal record. Many other teams took it relatively easy today, testing strength and endurance and fine tuning their rhythm.

"California Eights Test Rough Water/ Practice Starts at Poughkeepsie – Wisconsin and Syracuse Row Today." New York TIMES, June 9, 1939; Page 32, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article mentions how California put in a good practice today on the Hudson. The Bears had rough water to contend with and their practice was not as smooth as some would have expected it to be. The article also announces that Wisconsin and Syracuse will be meeting for a quick race against each other. When the race is over, both schools will go to Poughkeepsie for the Regatta. There is a picture with this article.

"California Oarsmen Off To Poughkeepsie/ Ebright Bringing His Strongest Crew Since Great 1932 Eight." New York TIMES, June 4, 1939; Section 5, Page 3, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California is currently on its way to Poughkeepsie to begin preparation for the Regatta. California is widely considered to be the favorite to win the Varsity race this year. Their varsity crew is thought to be the strongest crew Ebright has sent to Poughkeepsie since his Olympic winning 1932 team.

"California Rows Fast Time Trial Over Poughkeepsie Race Course/ Observers Clock Bears in About 19 Minutes for 4 Miles – Princeton Goes Route at Low Beat – Wisconsin Makes Change." New York TIMES, June 19, 1941; Page 32, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses how California held a time trial today, and according to observers did very well. Other colleges are planning time trials later on in the week. For now most crews are rowing easy practices over the full four mile course. The article also announces that for the first time the Regatta will be rigged with a short-wave communications system. This will allow the spectators to hear about the progress of the crews before they are able to see them, as well as delays and cancellations of the races.

"California, Sure of Victory, Entrains for Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1927; Page 26.

This article announces that a strong California crew is on its way to Poughkeepsie for the Regatta.

"California To Row In Hudson Regatta/ Stewards Asked to Secure Quarters at Poughkeepsie for Pacific Coast Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspaper The New York TIMES, Apr. 26, 1921; Page 24.

California will be journeying across the country to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. They will be spending three weeks on the east coast and have requested quarters for thirteen men and their shells.

"California to Row on Hudson If Crew Defeats Washington." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 8, 1921; Page 16.

If California defeats Washington in their yearly race, they will also travel east to the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"California Trip In Doubt/ Crew May Miss Poughkeepsie Regatta 1st Time in 15 Years." New York TIMES, April 22, 1941; Page 29, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reveals that due to financial restraints, California may not be participating in this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta for the first time in fifteen years.

"California's Cub Eight To Row at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, May 8, 1936; Page 31, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the California coach decided to take the freshman team to row in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, rather than the Jayvee team.

"Callow Calls Crew Best He Ever Knew/ Says Washington Is Two Lengths Better Than Last Year's – Butler Proud of Navy." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1926; Page 15.

This article reports on Coach Callow's reaction to his winning crew, as well as reactions from some other coaches.

"Callow Doubtful On Eve Of Race/ Says He Will Be Surprised if Washington Crew Is Better Than Fourth/ Butler More Cautious/ 'It Looks Like A Tough Race,' Says Navy Coach – Wray Optimistic – Glendon and Spuhn Hopeful." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1927; Page 19.

This article posts what the coaches' predictions are for their own crews as well as who will be the strong contenders and possible winners of the races.

"Callow Predicts Cornell Will Win/ Penn Coach Sees Washington Second and Columbia Third in Poughkeepsie Race/ Wisconsin In Time Trial/ Badgers' Brilliant Showing Earlier in Week Revealed – Oarsmen Rest Today." New York TIMES, June 16, 1940; Section 5, Page 2, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Rusty Callow, the coach for Pennsylvania, who is not participating in the Regatta, predicts that Cornell will win the Regatta this year, with Washington and Columbia following in second and third. The article also discusses Wisconsin briefly, which appears to be in good condition, but it is doubtful if they have the power needed for the four-mile grind. There is a picture and a fact sheet with this article.

"Calm Before Boat Race/ Six 'Varsity Crews at Poughkeepsie Await Tuesday's Struggle/ Coaches Explain Strokes/ Cornell and Wisconsin the Favorites for Intercollegiate Regatta, with Columbia Well Fancied." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 1, 1901; Page 3.

This article discusses the attitude of the crews now that the races on Tuesday are so close, and it reviews their different rowing techniques. It gives an overview of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and finally it briefly talks about the possibility of the single sculls being re-entered at the last minute if Georgetown enters a crew into the race.

"Cancellation Likely For Rowing Classic/ Colleges Unable to Settle Date – Final Decision in View Today." New York TIMES, May 12, 1942; Page 26, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the fact that it is most likely that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be cancelled this year. It has already been decided that the Regatta cannot be held on the Hudson this year, its traditional course, because of the war. The stewards have been forced to move the date of the Regatta up because of the war as well, and it is becoming impossible for all the schools to agree on date when they would be able to send a representative.

"Chairman Bogue Quits Rowing Body/ Head of Intercollegiate Board of Stewards to Attend Last Meeting Next Week/ Second Change In Month/ Maxwell Stevenson, Who Replaced Him on Columbia Committee, Appointed as His Successor." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 5 1924; Page 16.

This article reveals that Morton G. Bogue, Chairman of the Board of Stewards has quit his position. Maxwell Stevenson has been chosen to take his place. The article also mentions that the board may consider another place to hold the Regatta, and that with Bogue gone they will no longer consider lengthening the race back to four miles because he was the only supporter.

"Change Favors Columbia/ Morningside Crew Will Have Advantage in Three-Mile Rowing Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 1, 1917; Page 12.

The new distance of three miles for the Poughkeepsie Regatta will benefit Columbia because the new starting line is in front of their boathouse so they won't have to row far at all to reach the starting line.

"Change Unlikely In Poughkeepsie Race/ Penn and Cornell Will Probably Oppose Four-Mile Distance in Rowing Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 19, 1920; Page 20.

Columbia is pushing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta to return to the four mile distance, and it looks like the debate is going to heat up again, although the favor still seems to be with the proponents of the three-mile distance.

"Cheers For The Oarsmen/ Ellis Ward Pleased with 'Pennsy's' Work – Columbia Fairly Beaten." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1896; Page 3.

The coaches' congratulate the Pennsylvania crew, and comment on their own crews' performances.

"Childs Cup Winners Go To Poughkeepsie/ Plans Are Shifted and Jim Rice Takes Irmiger's Eight to Camp on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 2, 1924; Page 20.

This article announces that the coach of Pennsylvania's crew has decided to send the crew that won the Child's cup to the Poughkeepsie Regatta, rather than the crew he had originally intended to send.

Childs, Kingsley., "Eastern Colleges Air Sports Plans/Sentiment of Seven Groups in Session Here Is to 'Carry On' Despite the War/List Poughkeepsie Races/Rowing Association Hopes to Hold Regatta During June – Bushnell Re-elected." New York TIMES, January 9, 1942; Page 28, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Board of Stewards met and unanimously decided to try to hold the Poughkeepsie Regatta in June if at all possible. They scheduled a tentative date for June 15th, but that is not set in stone yet. Despite the war, all spring sports are attempting to have normal seasons. The Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held if at all possible.

"Citizens' Committee Named For Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 9, 1924; Page 26.

This article announces that a committee has been formed that will be in charge of all goings on in Poughkeepsie for the Intercollegiate Regatta.

"Club Chat About Sports/Bits of Truth and Gossip that attract attention/Much attention over shells this season, the Complaint of College Oarsmen-Columbia's Handicap at Poughkeepsie-Yale Beaten on her merits, but her showing considered most satisfactory-ought to meet Cornell and Harvard." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, July 12, 1896; Page 12.

This article is a recording of a conversation held among club members. They are discussing recent rowing events and their results. One particular point of interest for them is the fact that Columbia's boat was made very poorly and was largely responsible for the bad race that Columbia had at the Poughkeepsie Regatta that year.

"Club Oarsmen Restricted/ They Cannot Row for a College Until a Year After Entrance." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 23, 1916; Page 12.

The board of stewards have created a new rule barring any men from rowing on a college freshmen or varsity crew team if they have rowed for a professional club before. The only exception allowed is if they have already lived at the college for a year or more. This ruling will particularly affect Syracuse.

"Coach Courtney Pleased/ Change of Regatta Date Give His Backward Crews an advantage." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 16, 1909; Page C5.

This article mentions how Coach Courtney of Cornell is pleased that the date of the Poughkeepsie Regatta has been pushed back. It has not been a good spring and his crews have not been able to get the kind of practice that he would like. This extension will give them the extra practice time at Poughkeepsie that they'll need to get ready for the Regatta.

"Coach Courtney's Skull Fractured/ 'Old Man' Trains Crews After Injury Received Two Weeks Ago." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1915; Page 13.

This article reveals that Cornell's coach fractured his skull on the way to Poughkeepsie, and he coached his team with the injury.

"Coach Lehmann Talks/ Accepts Blame for Harvard's Poor Condition, but Wants to Try Again Next Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1897; Page 4.

This article is an interview with the Harvard coach on the Poughkeepsie race.

"Coach Rice Saves Two/ All Alone, He Rescues Two Italians Drowning in the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1914; Page 1.

This article announces that Coach Rice of the Columbia crews saved two Italians from drowning today while his men were out for a practice row.

"Coach Rice Takes Crews On Hudson/ Columbia Eights Have First Workouts at Poughkeepsie for Races June 28." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1923; Page 8.

Columbia went out for their first workout on the Hudson river in preparation of the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Coach Surprised By Triple Victory/ Ulbrickson Credits the Rough Water With Handicapping Foes, Especially Navy." New York TIMES, June 23, 1937; Page 31, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reveals that although Al Ulbrickson, coach of the Huskies, was very pleased by the performance his boys put on today on the Hudson, he definitely had not expected another sweep of the Regatta. Many coaches expressed their admiration for the Washington crews, acknowledging that many other crews, particularly Navy rowed great races, but in the end none of them were a match for the power and skill of Washington. Ulbrickson expressed hope for next year as well, despite the fact that he will be losing five men from his varsity squad.

"Coach Ulbrickson Praises Oarsmen/ 'Great Rowing' Says Washington Mentor of His Three Eights and Their Rivals/ Ebright Lauds Winners/ Calls Huskies 'A Remarkable Crew' – Navy and Columbia Major Surprises." New York TIMES, June 23, 1936; Page 29, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts short interviews that many of the coaches gave after the Regatta was over. Al Ulbrickson, the Varsity coach for Washington was very proud of the performance all his boys gave. He was also very impressed with the crews of all the other colleges. The coaches of California and Navy gave high praise to Washington. Everyone was very impressed with the display of skill and strength the Huskies put on this day.

"Coast Crew Here June 3/ Washington Will Bring Junior Varsity East for First Time." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 1, 1924; Page 17.

This article announces that Washington will come to Poughkeepsie two weeks before the Regatta to begin training, and that they will bring their junior varsity crew with them for the first time.

"Coast Crew Makes Best Time In Spin/ Washington Eight Covers Regatta Course in 14:27 Under Fine Conditions." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1922; Page 23.

All the colleges went out for time trials today and they all performed very well, especially Washington.

"Coast Crews Start Work On Hudson/ Washington Eights Take a Slow Paddle on First Day at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1924; Page 15.

This article announces that Washington and Wisconsin have arrived on the Hudson to begin practice.

"Coast Guard To Patrol/ 15 Craft Charged With Duty of Clearing Rowing Course." New York TIMES, June 16, 1939; Page 32, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that 15 Coast Guard ships will be charged with controlling traffic on the Hudson for the races. All pleasure craft must be tied up by 3:00 p.m. on the day of the race, and after that only the Coast Guard boats will be allowed to move.

"Coast Juniors Score Sensational Victory/ Come From Behind to Beat Cornell – Syracuse Cubs Win, Penn 2d, Columbia 3d." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1925; Page 14.

This article announces that Washington won the Junior Varsity race, and Syracuse won the Freshmen race. A detailed description of each race is played out.

"Coast Vote Upsets Local Rowing Men/ Columbia and Syracuse See Strong Enemy to Four-Mile Race in Washington." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 28, 1923; Page S4.

Washington is in favor of the three mile distance at the Poughkeepsie Regatta race, and Columbia and Syracuse are afraid that their unofficial vote may influence Cornell and Pennsylvania in their stand against the four mile race.

"Cold Forces Hart From Huskie Boat/ Veteran No. 6, Out With Smallpox in California Race, Lost for Rest of Week/ Columbia In Time Trial/ Navy, Paced by Plebes, Also Covers Poughkeepsie Course – Bears Hold to One Practice Plan." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1927; Page 21.

This article announces that one member of the Husky crew is out with a bad cold and may not be able to row in the Regatta. The Navy held practice today, and their freshmen crew did wonderful, keeping pace with their other crews. It also very briefly mentions how the others schools are doing.

"College Crews All Ready For Races/ Columbia and Cornell Favored for 'Varsity Event at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1915; Page 7.

This article talks about the Regatta, who the favorites are and why, and how the betting has been proceeding.

"College Crews All Ready For Races/ Cornell Again Holds Top Place in Betting – Big Demand for Car Tickets." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1914; Page 11.

This article discusses the crews that are all ready for the Regatta, who the favorites are and why, and the interest that the public has shown in the Regatta.

"College Crews Are Fit/ Cornell 'Varsity Confident for the Big Race To-day/ Wisconsin A Strong Factor/ Columbia Scrub Four Added a Little Excitement by Beating Syracuse and Pennsylvania." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1902; Page 6.

This article discusses the expectations for each of the crews in the Regatta tomorrow, and why it is felt they will perform as predicted.

"College Crews At Saratoga/ Cornell, Columbia, and Pennsylvania Men Practicing for the Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1898; Page 7.

This article reveals that although thunderstorms interfered with the practice of the crews preparing for the Regatta in the morning, they were all out on the lake that afternoon.

"College Crews Await The Big Moment/ Months of Grinding Work Have Led Up To the Struggles Over the New London and Poughkeepsie Courses." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1926; Page SM9.

This article talks about the two big crew races that are coming up in New London and Poughkeepsie. It gives a brief history of racing, as well as a brief look at the training the crews go through, and what it is like to watch one of these big races.

"College Crews For the New London and Poughkeepsie Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 21, 1908; Page S1.

This is a chart that lists all of the crews that are going to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as their members, weight, and position they rowed in.

"College Crews Move On To Poughkeepsie/ Columbia in the Van Will Leave New York Tomorrow/ Penn Expected on Friday/ Others Follow Later, Wisconsin Being Last Schedule to Arrive – Local Men at Red Top." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1905; Page 10.

This article announces when the college rowing crews participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta will begin arriving on the river to practice for the big race. Columbia will be first to arrive and they are expected on Monday.

"College Crews Practice/ Wisconsin Squad Arrives at Poughkeepsie – Harvard Rows in Good Form." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1904; Page 2.

This article announces that the Wisconsin rowing crew arrived on the Hudson to begin practice, as well as briefly going over how the other crews have been doing.

"College Crews Preparing/ Freshmen and 'Varsities Getting into Trim for the Great Struggles at Poughkeepsie/ Incident Of An Ebb Tide/ Cornell Has Shown the Best Form on the River, and Is the Favorite – Prophets a-Plenty, but Bettors Few – Yale's Luck Feared." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1897; Page 3.

This article compares the crews that will be participating in the Regatta, as well as gives the experts opinion on how each will perform in the upcoming race.

"College Crews Row Despite the Heat/ Coaches Work Their Oarsmen Over the Poughkeepsie Regatta Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 16, 1910; Page 11.

This article tells what each school has been doing to get ready for the Regatta. Some schools have only been doing light practices, others more strenuous ones, but all of them have been on the river daily. They all believe that they still have a lot of work to do before they are ready for the Regatta.

"College Crews Take Rest/ Penn, Syracuse and Columbia Cease Drills for a Day." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1923; Page 11.

All the crews on the Hudson enjoyed a day of rest, while they await the arrival of Washington tomorrow.

"Coast Crew's Test Shows Much Power/ Washington Eight Rows Four Miles in Rough Water on Hudson in 21:38." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1925; Page 19.

This article reveals Washington's impressive time trial and the effect it's having on the coaches, as well as the practice routines of other crews on the water and when they plan on having their own time trials.

"College Crews Train For Actual Struggle/ Vanguard Arrives at Poughkeepsie and New London/ Cornell Eight Well Liked/ Columbia and Syracuse May Give Ithacans Hard Fight – Close Race Expected on Thames." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1905; Page 6.

This article discusses the predictions of how the races at Poughkeepsie and New London will unfold as far as attendance and winners.

"College Men Row Fast/ Pennsylvania and Harvard Crews Make Good Time/ The Quakers Row the Four-Mile Course in 19:36, and Harvard's Crew Is Only Five Seconds Slower – Courtney Pleased with the Course, and Praises the Pennsylvania Crew – Columbia Men Doing Well, and May Be Winners." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1896; Page 3.

This article gives descriptive details of the crews' practice routines on the Hudson, as well as some experts' opinions of how all the crews are doing and who is looking the best.

"College Oarsmen Await Final Test/ Cornell, Syracuse, Columbia, and Penn Crews Eager for Race on Saturday/ Situation A Novel One/ Less Time to Prepare Than Ever Before, and the Coaches Vie in Doing the Unexpected." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1916; Page S2.

This article discusses the upcoming Regatta, who the favorites are considered to be and how each of the crews have been performing in practice.

"College Oarsmen Begin Real Work/ Many Coaches Will Put Squads Into Indoor Action on Machines This Week/ Fine Outlook Nationally/ Conditions East and West Are Such as to Promise Sport of a High Grade in Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers the New York TIMES, Jan. 7, 1917; Page S3.

A look-ahead to the upcoming year of rowing, the expectations for the crews on the east and west coast, and the performances that are expected to be seen in the Regattas.

"College Oarsmen Get Day Of Rest/ Crews of Six Schools Enjoy Last Respite Before Regatta on Thursday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1923; Page 9.

All six schools had their last day of rest before the regatta, which was fortunate since the temperature made it up to 98 degrees. The crews spent their time going to church, relaxing, and visiting with people. The Navy crewmen drove all the way down to West Point to visit their fellow servicemen.

"College Oarsmen In Final Training/ Crews Gathering for Big Regattas, with Prospect of Very Close Races Ahead/ Poughkeepsie Situation/ Five Colleges Have Strong Following on Their Record of Preliminary Races – The New London Contest." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1907; Page C4.

This article discusses the final training days of the crews involved in the Poughkeepsie Regatta and the Yale – Harvard race.

"College Oarsmen In Final Trials/ Yale and Harvard Crews Training on the Thames at New London/ The Poughkeepsie Crews/ Picking Winners Already for Hudson Regatta – Columbia Freshmen Favorites – Syracuse Four Liked." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1908; S1.

This article discusses how practice has been going for those crews that are participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as whom the favorites are expected to be.

"College Oarsmen Looking Ahead/ Changes in Coaches at Yale and Pennsylvania Makes Interest Keen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 11, 1914; Page S3.

This article looks ahead to the two big races coming up this year, the Yale-Harvard race and the intercollegiate regatta. It discusses the crews that will be participating and how they are looking for this year.

"College Oarsmen Priming For Races/ Yale and Harvard Aquatic Battle Comes Next Friday at New London/ Intercollegiates June 29/ Six Crews Will Strive for Honors at Poughkeepsie, with Cornell and Columbia Closely Matched." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 16, 1912; Page C7.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta that will be held soon. All of the crews are gearing up for it. The only crew that has not arrived on the river yet is Pennsylvania. Cornell won the Regatta last year and they are considered to be the favorites, although they had to fight a close battle with Columbia last year. Although they are not considered to be a factor in this year's Regatta, Stanford is a big point of interest in this Regatta. It's their first visit to the Hudson, and they had to travel 3,000 miles to get there. In addition, the Stanford crew is going to be rowing in a borrowed shell, and without their coach. They have a tough battle ahead of them, and have won many sympathetic supporters.

"College Oarsmen Ready For Races/ Many Crews Will Compete at the Philadelphia Regatta on Saturday/ Are Improving Rapidly/ Eights Give Promises of Fine Combinations – Yale and Harvard Rowing Strong – Training For Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 17, 1908; Page S3.

This article mentions how the Board of Stewards for the Poughkeepsie Regatta forbids any teams participating in the Regatta to have races against each other prior to the Regatta. It also mentions how many coaches are looking forward to this year's Regatta, and they all feel that they have a good chance at doing well.

"College Oarsmen Spend A Quiet Day/ Picnics Occupy Some at Poughkeepsie – Yale and Harvard Go Yachting." New York TIMES, June 17, 1940; Page 23, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article mentions how on the day before the Regatta most teams took it easy, and didn't do any workouts. The few teams that did go on the river only did some light paddling; all stressful exercises were ended yesterday. Cornell and Washington are still considered to be the favorites, but there are betting odds available for all teams participating in the Regatta.

"College Races on Hudson/ The Poughkeepsie Regatta Committee Making Arrangements for the Coming Events." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, March 4, 1897; Page 7.

This article announces that the local Regatta Committee for Poughkeepsie met to discuss the upcoming race. The committee decided that they needed to raise $2,500 for the Regatta this year. The article also announces where the various colleges will be housed for the race this year.

"College Races Up Stream/ Tide Conditions Cause Change in Course on Hudson for This Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 7, 1909; Page S2.

This article announces that for the first time in the history of the Poughkeepsie Regatta the direction the crews will be racing in will be reversed due to the tidal conditions.

"The College Regatta/ All the Races at Poughkeepsie to be Rowed June 30." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 6, 1900; Page 3.

Posts the date that the Regatta will be held, the times the races will begin, and some of the schools that will be participating.

"College Regatta Off If War Comes/ Stewards Make Poughkeepsie Contest Conditional – Send Tentative Invitations." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 29, 1917; Page 15.

The Board of Stewards has made the decision that if Congress declares war, the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be called off.

"College Regatta Plans/ Poughkeepsie-Highland Association Arranges for the Annual Rowing Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 4, 1902; Page 10.

This article lists who the elected officers for the Rowing Association are, as well as the colleges that are expected to participate in the Regatta.

"College Rowing Association/Big Universities, Except Yale and Harvard, to be Asked to Join it." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, January 13, 1900; Page 9.

The directors of the IRA, Cornell, Columbia and Pennsylvania, are striving to form an American University Rowing Association. Many big schools have been invited to join, including Wisconsin, Bowdoin, Toronto, Brown, and Syracuse. There have also been attempts to change the location of the yearly Regatta from Poughkeepsie to Onondaga Lake. The only thing that is certain right now is that the yearly Regatta will be the premier rowing event each year.

"Colleges Declare Schedules Of Sports Void In View Of Existence Of War/ War Declaration Halts Athletics/ Intercollegiate Contests Canceled by Leading and Many Minor Institutions/ Poughkeepsie Classic Off/ Regatta Stewards Vote by Telegraph – Tennis and Golf Await Advice from Washington." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 7, 1917; Page 10.

The declaration of war has ended the prospect of all college sports for this year, including the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Alumni Charter Boat for the Poughkeepsie Regatta," New York TIMES, May 13, 1931; Page 31, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that hundreds of Columbia alumni, as well as their family and friends, will be watching that years Poughkeepsie Regatta from a boat that the alumni chartered. There will loud-speakers installed onto the boat so that those onboard will be able to hear what is happening during the beginning of the race.

"Columbia Alumni to Run Special Boat to Regatta." New York TIMES, May 24, 1934; Page 31, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the intention of Columbia alumni to charter a Hudson River boat for the Regatta. It is expected that there will be 500 Columbia fans on board the vessel to cheer the blue and white team on during the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Columbia Announces Substitute Oarsmen/ Entire Crew Will Leave Here for Poughkeepsie on Friday Morning." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1927; Page 33.

This article names Columbia's substitute oarsmen, and announces that the three crews will be leaving for Poughkeepsie on Friday.

"Columbia And Navy Reign As Favorites/ Blue and White and Middy Crews Given High Rating in Hudson Regatta Today/ Cornell The Dark Horse/ Displacement of Sophomores by Heavy Eight Baffles Critics – 100,000 Expected." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1921; Page 21.

Crews participated in final practices today. Columbia and Navy are considered to be the favorites for the varsity race. Everyone thinks it will be an exciting event; it has been a long time since six different crews were participating in the varsity event, and a huge crowd is expected.

"Columbia at Krum Elbow/ Oarsmen Go to Poughkeepsie to Prepare for Regatta June 21." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1913; Page 10.

This New York Times article announces when Columbia will be arriving on the Hudson River to begin practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia at Poughkeepsie/ Stiff Training for the Blue and White Oarsmen Is the Order." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1909; Page S3.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived on the Hudson River to begin practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Crew Attacked By Boils/ Simonds Unable to Row, but Tichborn and Myers Go Out for Practice." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1915; Page 12.

Three members of the Columbia crew have boils and it has had a bad effect on them during practice.

"Columbia Crew Does Well/ 'Varsity Eight Rows Four Miles in Twenty Minutes and Twenty Seconds." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1901; Page 9.

This article discusses the time trial that Columbia held and how their crew is looking for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Crew Heaviest/ Averages Show Lions Will Outweigh Opponents at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1929; Page 20.

This article declares that Columbia will have the heaviest crew on the Hudson for this Regatta. There is also a small chart that lists the average weight, age, and height of all the crews participating.

"Columbia Crew In A Long Row/ Coach Rice Gives 'Varsity Eight Strenuous Practice on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1915; Page 19.

This article gives a brief description of the hard practice Columbia held.

"Columbia Crew In Quarters/ Oarsmen Will Have First Practice at Poughkeepsie Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1905; Page 7.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived at Poughkeepsie and is ready to begin practicing for the Regatta.

"Columbia Crew Is Fast/ Henlan Says It Is Thirty Seconds Better Than Last Year – Will Give Exhibition Time Row To-day." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1903; Page 2.

This article briefly talks about the Columbia crew, and how they are performing this year.

"Columbia Crew Picked/ Coach Rice Finds Combination That Works Well in 'Varsity Boat." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1915; Page 11.

All of the crews participating in the Regatta are on the Hudson, and they each have been doing their own various activities.

"Columbia Crew Wins 4-Mile Hudson Race as 100,000 Look On/ Leads Washington By Three-Quarters of a Length, With California Third in Classic/ First Victory Since 1914/ Navy Fourth, Cornell Fifth and Syracuse Sixth – Penn Last as Log Cuts Hole in Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1927; Page 1.

This article announces that Columbia has won the Varsity race of the Poughkeepsie Regatta for the first time since 1914. The rest of the article gives extensive accounts of all three races of the day, including the accident that kept Penn from being a real competitor.

"Columbia Crews Arrive/ Blue and White Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie for College Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 29, 1916; Page 12.

This article announces that the official training for the Poughkeepsie Regatta has begun with the arrival of Columbia on the river.

"Columbia Crews Arrive/ Take Ten-Mile Workout on Cayuga Lake – Syracuse There Too." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1920; Page 12.

Columbia arrived on Cayuga Lake and immediately went out for a ten mile long practice. Syracuse arrived later that night.

"Columbia Crews At Camp/ Coach Rice and 30 Oarsmen Arrive at Poughkeepsie Training Quarters." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1915; Page 8.

This article reveals that Columbia has arrived on the Hudson.

"Columbia Crews at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1904; Page 13.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived on the Hudson River to begin practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Crews at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1899; Page 5.

This article describes the extra-curricular activities of the Columbia crews at Poughkeepsie.

"Columbia Crews Changed/ Final Arrangement of the Eights – Preparing for Poughkeepsie Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1901; Page 7.

This article discusses the practice routines of Columbia in preparation of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and the changes their coach has made in the boat lineups.

"Columbia Crews Depart/ Will Probably Get First Workout on Lake Cayuga Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1920; Page 20.

Columbia has left for Cayuga Lake to begin practice for the Regatta.

"Columbia Crews Drill On Hudson/ Three Eights Have First Tests at Poughkeepsie – Wisconsin Oarsmen Arrive." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1924; Page 17.

This article reveals what the colleges on the Hudson did to practice for the Regatta.

"Columbia Crews Hampered In Work/ Lack of Proper Quarters and Illness of Men Retard Training/ Von Saltza And Gatch Out/ But Coach Rice Hopes to Get Conditions Greatly Improved Before Regatta on June 27." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1908; Page S3.

All of the crews participating in the Regatta will be on the river by Tuesday to practice. Columbia has not had a positive experience so far on the Hudson; they have very poor housing, and some of their men have fallen ill.

"Columbia Crews' Hard Row/ Hanlan Has Brought About Great Changes Since He Started Coaching." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1900; Page 8.

This article talks about Columbia's practice, which was extremely strenuous, and Coach Hanlan's reaction to how the crews performed and their improvement.

"Columbia Crews' Last Row/ Boats and Rowing Squad Will Leave for Poughkeepsie Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1900; Page 9.

This article announces that Columbia will be leaving tomorrow for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Crews Leave Tomorrow/ Group of 41 Will Make Trip to Krum Elbow for Poughkeepsie Regatta June 16/ Boatings Are Announced/ Eight-Oared Reserves' Boat Eliminated This Year – California Oarsmen on Way." New York TIMES, June 1, 1934; Page 32, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Columbia crews have left for Poughkeepsie, and there are 41 men on the way. In the interest of money, they decided to not bring the reserve crews for the varsity and jayvee teams this year. The members of each Columbian team and where they will be rowing is also announced. It is also mentioned that California is also on the way to Poughkeepsie, and as the defending champions, they are expected to perform well in the races.

"Columbia Crews Leave Tomorrow/ Shells and Equipment Sent to Poughkeepsie Quarters – Changes Made in Boatings." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1923; Page 18.

The shells and equipment of Columbia have been sent to Poughkeepsie, and the oarsmen will be leaving tomorrow, with changes in the lineup already made by Coach Rice.

"Columbia Crews Off for Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1902; Page 10.

This article mentions that Columbia will be leaving today for Poughkeepsie to begin practice for the Regatta.

"Columbia Crews Off To-day/ 'Varsity and Freshmen Oarsmen Leave for Poughkeepsie Quarters." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1904; Page 7.

The Columbia crews have traveled to Poughkeepsie to begin practicing two weeks ahead of schedule. Besides gaining an extra two weeks practice on the Hudson River course they will also benefit economically because they will only be housing the crews on one location instead of two.

"Columbia Crew's Practice/ Good Weather Conditions Prevailed During the First Row Over the Famous Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1900; Page 8.

The weather and water conditions for Columbia's first practice on the Hudson was outstanding.

"Columbia Crews Practice/ Long-Distance Rowing is Now the Feature on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1900; Page 8.

This article discusses Columbia's new method of rowing long distances to train for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Crews Rest/ Have No Rowing Practice – California Shells Arrive." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1921; Page 16.

Columbia rested from practice today and the California shells arrived ahead of the crews.

"Columbia Crews Row Time Trials/ Coach Rice Gives Out No Figures, but Seems Well Pleased with the Results." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1914; Page 9.

This article talks about time trials that crews performed, as well as betting about who will win.

"Columbia Crews Take 11-Mile Spin/ Blue and White Oarsmen Begin to Show Form and Miller Is Pleased With Varsity." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1924; Page 11.

This article details Columbia's practice and their coach's reaction.

"Columbia Crews to Go to Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1899; Page 8.

This article reveals that Columbia will leave this morning for Poughkeepsie.

"Columbia Eights Alone On Hudson/ Three Crews Go Out for Spin at Poughkeepsie While All Others Rest/ Navy Opens Its Quarters/ Washington Oarsmen Also Get Shells Ready for Week of Hard Practice Ahead." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1926; Page 25.

This article reveals what each of the crews did for practice on this day.

"Columbia Flotilla To Drill On Hudson/ Vanguard of Intercollegiate Rowing Champions Reaches Poughkeepsie Quarters/ Trial Carded Tomorrow/ Two Sub Chasers With Shells and Coaching Launches En Route to Pitch Navy Camp." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1928; Page 21.

This article announces that Columbia's crews have begun to arrive on the Hudson to practice for the Regatta, and it also mentions when other participating schools are planning to arrive.

"Columbia Freshman Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, December 4, 1909; Page 12.

This article announces that although Columbia's freshmen crew had been cancelled, the school decided to allow them to try again, following a petition from crew members. They must show that they can have enough members try out so that the coach can pick a representative crew to send to the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Gets Flag/ Old Oarsmen at Raising of Pennant at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1915; Page S4.

This article announces that some old Columbia crew members presented the current Columbia crews with a pennant for them to display.

"Columbia Has Only To Beat Cornell/ Coach Jim Rice Makes Prediction for Intercollegiate 'Varsity Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1914; Page 8.

This article posts the opinion of Coach Jim Rice that the race will be between Columbia and Cornell this year. It also describes the effect the rough water of the Hudson had on the practicing crews.

"Columbia Is Out Of 150-Pound Race/ Withdrawal Will Probably Cause Omission of Event at Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1922; Page 14.

Columbia has decided that they will not send a 150 pound crew to the Hudson River for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and since they and Pennsylvania were the only schools with crews entered, it is most likely that there will be no lightweight crew race.

"Columbia Man Gets Post For Regatta/ Watt Named Executive Secretary to Board of Stewards of Poughkeepsie Race/ To Arrange All Details/ Providing Boathouses and Living Quarters for Oarsmen Included Among His Duties." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 10, 1924; Page 10.

This article announces that Robert W. Watt has been announced executive secretary for the Board of Stewards for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and lists what some of his duties will be.

"Columbia Oarsmen at Training Camp/ Reach Poughkeepsie Quarters Too Late for Workouts – Rice Noncommittal." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1923; Page 25.

Columbia arrived on the Hudson although too late to begin practice. Their Coach is not making any predictions about how they will be performing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Oarsmen Given Long Paddle/ Coach Rice Sends Crews Eight and a Half Miles in First Row at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1922; Page 19.

The Columbia Oarsmen arrived on the Hudson today and they immediately went out for a long paddle.

"Columbia Oarsmen Given Long Pulls/ Crews Cover 18 Miles in Two Practice Sessions at Poughkeepsie – Rice Dissatisfied." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1922; Page 30.

Columbia had a tough practice on the Hudson today, and it was made even tougher by the fact that their coach was not happy with their performance.

"Columbia Oarsmen Have 17-Mile Test/ Continue Hard Practice on Hudson River – Syracuse Crews Expected Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1923; Page 16.

Columbia held a strenuous 17 mile practice on their last day on the river alone. Syracuse will be arriving tomorrow, followed quickly by the other schools.

"Columbia Oarsmen In Double Workout/ Have Busy Day at Poughkeepsie Camp – Shake-Up in Boating of Freshmen Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1921; Page 21.

The Columbia coach pushed his men hard with a double workout today, and he also mixed up the lineup in his freshmen crew.

"Columbia Oarsmen In Practice Test/ Varsity Holds Junior Eight With Ease in First Brush – Penn Awaits Launch." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1921; Page 22.

Columbia had a hard practice and a practice time trial today, while Pennsylvania, Navy, and Syracuse also held tough practices.

"Columbia Oarsmen Leave For Krum Elbow Camp." New York TIMES, May 30, 1937; Section 5, Page 4, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Columbia's rowing team for the Poughkeepsie Regatta left today to go to Krum Elbow and begin training for the biggest crew race of the year. The coach announced before he left that he didn't know who would be in the varsity boat yet, and that he would most likely wait until the last minute to decide.

"Columbia Oarsmen Open Hudson Camp/ Lions Lose Little Time Getting Out on River After Reaching Krum Elbow/ Two Drills Listed Today/ Glendon Will Shift Boatings in Attempt to Strengthen Crews for June 25." New York TIMES, June 4, 1941; Page 30, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Columbia arrived in Poughkeepsie today, and the men immediately got in a row to start loosening up. They expect to start double practices tomorrow, and for the next few days they will have the Hudson entirely to themselves. The seat order for the boats has not been finalized yet; the Columbia coach will make his final decisions within the next few days.

"Columbia Oarsmen Reach Poughkeepsie/ Establish Themselves at Boathouse and Plan to Commence Grind With Short Paddle Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1926; Page 11.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived on the Hudson River to begin training for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Oarsmen Reach Poughkeepsie/ Three Crews Arrive and Start Work for Regatta June 17." New York TIMES, June 1, 1939; Page 35, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Columbia is the first college to arrive on the Hudson this year to begin practicing for the big event. The coach had his three teams on the river this afternoon in a light practice, however he said the intensity of the practices would rise quickly.

"Columbia Oarsmen Rest/ Coach Rice Expects to Whip the Crews Into Shape This Week." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1915; Page 12.

This article mentions that the Columbia oarsmen get a day of rest from practice before another grueling week on the Hudson begins.

"Columbia Oarsmen Row Fastest Test/ It Is Learned That 4-Mile Trial of Wednesday Was Made in 19:15 – Navy Mark, 19:23/ Navy Lodges Complaint/ Eddy Back of Bridge Pier Retards Speed Is Charge – Hart Back on Washington Varsity." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1927; Page 17.

This article reports on a time trial that Columbia had today, as well as hard practices for Navy and Pennsylvania.

"Columbia Oarsmen Will Leave Friday/ Three Crews Expect to Hold Drill That Afternoon on the River at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 2, 1926; Page 22.

This article announces that Columbia will be leaving for the Hudson on Friday morning, and all three crews expect to be practicing by that afternoon.

"Columbia Oarsmen Will Leave Today/ Lion Crews Depart for Crum Elbow to Prepare for the Poughkeepsie Races/ Four Eights Are In Party/ Varsity, Junior Varsity, Freshmen and Combination Crews to Drill at Scene of Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1927; Page 18.

This article reveals that Columbia has left for the Hudson River to begin practice for the Regatta. They will be the first to arrive in Poughkeepsie. The article also speculates on who will be rowing in what position, seeing as the Columbia coaches have made many changes, as well as what the competition will be like this year.

"Columbia Oarsmen Will Leave Today/ To Go Into Training at Poughkeepsie, Where Haines Must Build New Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 31, 1925; Page S6.

This article announces that Columbia will be leaving for the Hudson River today, and their brand new coach will have a little under a month to prepare them to race in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Oarsmen Work In Downpour/ Glendon Keeps Crews Upstream at Poughkeepsie – Seeks Distance Instead of Speed/ Penn Boats Ordered Out/ Wisconsin Spends Time Getting New Launch on River – California's Arrival Awaited." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1926; Page 21.

This article discusses how the dismal weather is effecting the practices of Columbia, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

"Columbia Picks 32 For Regatta Camp/ Two Complete Cub Crews to Leave With Varsity for Poughkeepsie Saturday." New York TIMES, May 30, 1935; Page 24, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Columbia is going to send 32 men down to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. Besides the varsity crew, they are sending 2 complete freshmen boats as well. The reason for the large amount of men is that the coaches believe they have a very good freshmen class, and don't want to miss any opportunity to develop their skills.

"Columbia Reaches Crum Elbow Camp/ Four Lion Crews Dip Blades in Limbering Up Exercises on the Hudson/ Regatta Lanes Shifted/ Are Moved Ten Feet Toward Midstream for Intercollegiate Race on June 19." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1928; Page S5.

This article gives a brief description of Columbia's first practice, as well as announcing when other crews were due to arrive.

"Columbia Rowing May Be Abandoned/ Serious Doubts Exist Whether Crews Will Enter Poughkeepsie Races Next Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 14, 1916; Page 9.

This article announces that Columbia may not enter in the Poughkeepsie Regatta next year and may abandon rowing altogether due to the poor showing of potential crew members the last few years.

"Columbia Rowing Safe/ President Butler Contributes $1,000 to Wipe Out Deficit." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 5, 1908; Page 7.

This article reveals that Columbia's budget problems have been solved, and therefore they will be able to send a crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta the following year.

"Columbia Seeking Unison Of Stroke/ Glendon Faced With Problem of Changing System in Varsity Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1926; Page 19.

This article describes the struggle that Columbia's coach has been going through to get all of his crews to stroke the way he wants them too, so far only the freshmen have got it down.

"Columbia Starts On Hudson Friday/ Varsity, Jayvees and Freshmen to Begin Grind at Poughkeepsie Then/ Experiments Are Likely/ Longer Distance of Race Expected to Bring Various Shifts by Coaches." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 29, 1927; Page S6.

This article states that the Columbia crews will be on the Hudson to begin practice next Monday. It is expected that the coaches will do a good amount of experimenting with the seating positions of their crew members.

"Columbia To Have Crew Next Season/ Withdrawal of Cornell Means Abandonment of Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 20, 1918; Page 16.

Cornell is not going to have a crew team next spring, which means that there will not be a Poughkeepsie Regatta next year, but that is not going to stop Columbia from having their own crew team.

"Columbia To Have Crew/ Will Quit Poughkeepsie Regatta, but May Arrange Other Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 16, 1916; Page 16.

Columbia will continue to have a crew program, which was under debate, however they may withdraw from the Poughkeepsie Regatta because it is four miles.

"Columbia To Retain Crew/ Enthusiastic Alumni Kill Unanimously Proposal to Abolish Sport." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 21, 1916; Page 7.

This article reveals that due to overwhelming popular support, Columbia will not withdraw from the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia To Row In Time Trial To-Day/ Coach Rice Expects to Drive His Oarsmen at Full Speed at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1912; Page 11.

This New York Times article reveals that Columbia is planning on participating in a time trial tomorrow, so long as the weather cooperates. The rest of the article discusses how practices have been going for the various teams, as well as the best routes for spectators to drive to Poughkeepsie for the big race.

"Columbia To Send 4 Crews Up Hudson/ 150-Pound Eight to Train With Varsity, Jayvees and Freshmen at Poughkeepsie/ Oarsmen To Leave June 1/ Lightweights to Race Junior Varsity for Right to Enter Jayvee Race – Fleet Rows Ten Miles." New York TIMES, May 25, 1932; Page 28, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

Columbia is sending one of their lightweight crew teams to Poughkeepsie along with the Varsity, Junior Varsity, and Freshmen teams. The lightweight team is going to attempt to qualify to represent the Morningside Heights institution.

"Columbia 'Varsity in New Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1914; Page 8.

This article mentions that Columbia began practicing in their new shell for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Columbia Varsity Probably Settled/ No More Changes Likely in First Crew – Other Eights Due at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1922; Page 25.

Several crews are expected to arrive on the Hudson tomorrow, and the city was in a flurry of pre-regatta activity.

"Columbia Varsity Shows Good Form/ Wins Approval of Coach Rice, but Freshmen and Junior Eights Draw Criticism." ProQuest Historical Newspapers the New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1923; Page 17.

All the Columbia crews held practice today, and the varsity earned a bit of praise from their tough coach, but the junior varsity and freshmen crews still have a long way to go.

"Columbia Victory On Hudson Lauded/ Head Coach Glendon, Praised For Skill, Motors to Farm – Oarsmen Return Home/ Eight To Be Feted In Fall/ MacBain, Davenport and Walker Finish Rowing Careers – Princeton Likely Entrant in 1930." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1929; Page 28.

This article is written in praise of the victorious Columbia crew and their head coach for their wonderful season, culminating with a win on the Hudson River.

"Columbia Wins Big 'Varsity Race/ Persistence of Blue and White Oarsmen Triumphs at Last in a Slashing Contest/ Penn 2D, Then Cornell/ Ithacans Favorites for Four-Mile Event After Winning the Preliminary Contests/ Throngs At Poughkeepsie/ Winners Were Lightest and Youngest in Race, but Admirably Conditioned by Coach Rice." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1914, Page 1.

This article announces that Columbia won the varsity race at Poughkeepsie while Cornell won the junior varsity and freshmen races. A detailed description of the varsity race is given including the crowd's reaction, and post-race activities.

"Columbia's Boats In Danger/ Coach Hanlan's Perilous Trip Up the Hudson with the Shells in Tow." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1901; Page 10.

This article talks about what Columbia and Pennsylvania have been doing to prepare for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as relating how Columbia almost lost one of their shells on the way to Poughkeepsie.

"Columbia's Captain Out Of Hudson Race/ Rice Announces That Van Houten Will Not Row at Poughkeepsie – Had Been Ill." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1921; Page 24.

The captain of the varsity crew has been ill and the coach has announced he will not be rowing in the Poughkeepsie regatta.

"Columbia's Coach Lauds California/ Glendon Says Victory Was Deserved by Crew That Could Take Lead and Hold It/ Ebright Praises Columbia/ With a Tear in His Eye, Victor's Mentor Calls New York Combination 'Great.' " ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1928; Page 27.

This article posts Coach Ebright's high praises for his crew. He is very proud that they won. It also posts the other coaches' praises of California's performance.

"Columbia's Crew Strength/ The Situation Considered Ahead of Last Year's – Other Sporting News." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 7, 1905; Page 10.

This article expresses the opinion that this year Columbia University has an excellent shot at winning the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Columbia's Crews Will Leave Today/ Main Contingent to Depart for Poughkeepsie Training Camp This Morning/ To Stop At Crum Elbow/ Drill Carded on Hudson in the Afternoon – Lambart Is Already There." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 2, 1928; Page 12.

This article reveals that Columbia will be leaving for Poughkeepsie in one week. This is the first year since 1915 that Columbia has been considered the favorite, and the article recaps the condition that they are in this year.

"Columbia's Eight Holds Time Trial/ But Men Keep Beat Low and Steady – Syracuse and California Have Tests/ Shift In Navy Varsity/ Pieczsentowski Goes to Bow in the Place of Quilter – Middies Race Against Watch." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1928; Page 25.

This article reports on the time trials that all of the schools except for Washington and Pennsylvania participated in today.

"Columbia's Fine Form/ They Are Rowing Well at Poughkeepsie – Cornell Expected Tuesday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun.14, 1896; Page 3.

Describes how the crews look during practice, as well as when Cornell is expected to arrive.

"Columbia's Gloomy Prospect/ Hanlan Holds Out Little Hope for His Crew's Victory – Wisconsin at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1902; Page 6.

This article announces that Wisconsin is due to arrive on the Hudson today to begin practice for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. It also reveals that Coach Hanlan of Columbia does not anticipate that his crews will do well in the Regatta.

"Columbia's Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1914; Page 14.

This article briefly states the opinion that the Regatta was Columbia's race, not because of the particular stroke that was used, but because Columbia was a lighter and younger crew that was very determined.

"Columbia's Record Row/ New York Oarsmen Make New Figures for Four Miles/ Time Made In A Trial Pull/ Francis S. Bangs Stopped the Watch on Blue and White Eight at 19:07 – Prospects for the Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1901; Page 9.

This article talks about the wonderful time trial that Columbia had today.

"Columbia's 'Varsity Crew Chosen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 5, 1902; Page 6.

The coach of Columbia chose the members of his Varsity team that would row in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and they are listed in the article. There is also a chart listing the statistics of each member of the varsity team.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ College Rowing." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb.5, 1917; Page 8.

Description of the effect shortening the Poughkeepsie Regatta to three miles has on the race.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ Four-Mile Rowing." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 15, 1917; Page 6.

Discusses again the possibility of the Poughkeepsie Regatta becoming a three mile race.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ Revival of a Great Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 26, 1920; Page 8.

The Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held this year for the first time since 1916; the author gives a brief description of the history and prestige of the regatta.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ Rowing." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 20, 1920; Page 18.

The debate over whether the Poughkeepsie Regatta should be at three or four miles continues, and this article briefly highlights the main arguments of each side.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ Rowing." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 20, 1922; Page 17.

This article rehashes all the arguments that have been given in the past to shorten the Poughkeepsie Regatta to three miles, as well as the ones given to keep it at four miles. It speculates that if the Board of Stewards returns the race to four miles the majority of rowing enthusiasts will be very happy.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ Rowing." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 22, 1923; Page 12.

This article discusses once again the debate over whether the Poughkeepsie Regatta should be a three or four mile race, and it gives a brief history of the event as well.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ Rowing." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1922; Page 20.

The regattas that are held on the Thames and on the Hudson are gearing up for the big races. Columbia is already working on the Hudson River with the other crews expected not far behind. Since the Board of Stewards removed the 150-Pound race, the Poughkeepsie Regatta will consist of it's normal three races.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ Rowing at Columbia." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 17, 1916; Page 8.

The announcement that Columbia may not participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta because it is a four mile race has led to speculation that the event may be moved to Ithaca and held on Cayuga Lake.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ The Eclipse of Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1920; Page 30.

The Regatta will be held at Cayuga Lake this year, instead of Poughkeepsie, another blow to the famed course this year. The article speculates whether this is the nail in the coffin for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Comment on Current Events in Sports/ The Victory of the Orange Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1916; Page 12.

This article briefly recaps the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the triumph of Syracuse and the disappointment of Cornell, whose legendary coach must end his wonderful career on a defeat.

"Cornell and Columbia/ Coach Courtney Says These Crews Will Be Close Near the Finish." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1913; Page S3.

This New York Times article discusses Coach Courtney's expectations for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. He felt that all the teams would make a good showing, and there were several threats to Cornell's title, however he felt that Cornell and Columbia would be racing for first place this year.

"Cornell Arrives At Poughkeepsie/ Regatta Contingent Now Complete With the Exception of Annapolis Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1922; Page 24.

Cornell arrived on the Hudson today so now only Navy is missing. All of the crews at Poughkeepsie had hard workouts today, and Pennsylvania even got in two workouts.

"Cornell at Poughkeepsie/ Courtney and His Three Crews Join the Rowing Colony." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1914; Page 8.

This article announces that Cornell has arrived at Poughkeepsie to begin their training for the Regatta.

"Cornell At Poughkeepsie/ The Winners of Last Year's Boat Races Take Possession of Their Old Quarters/ Townspeople Welcome Them/ Coach Courtney Explains the Many Changes in the 'Varsity Crew – Columbia, Harvard, and Pennsylvania Preparing for the Struggle of June 25." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1897; Page 3.

Cornell has arrived on the Hudson to a warm welcome from the people of Poughkeepsie. A description is given of their quarters, and of their activities as soon as they arrived. It also briefly mentions the activities of the other crews on the Hudson.

"Cornell At Poughkeepsie/ 'Varsity and Junior Oarsmen Arrive – Courtney Already There." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1916; Page 13.

This article describes Cornell's arrival on the Hudson to begin practice for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Cornell By A Length Wins 'Varsity Race/ Pennsylvania Second After a Splendid Finish with Syracuse/ Six Crews in the Struggle/ Start Delayed by Thunderstorm Which Drenches Spectators but Fails to Dampen Enthusiasm." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 24, 1906; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, with Pennsylvania about a length behind and Syracuse closely following. The beginning of all three races were delayed because of consistent raining. The rain didn't dampen the enthusiasm of the spectators however. All three races were exciting to watch. Cornell beat the record set last year by almost a minute, coming in at 19:30 4-5. Despite the weather, 20,000 spectators came to the race proudly displaying their school's colors. The rest of the article describes the varsity race in detail from start to finish.

"Cornell Crew At Highland/ The Wisconsin Men Expected to Arrive on Tuesday Morning." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1899; Page 2.

This article reveals that Cornell has arrived on the Hudson, and Wisconsin is due to arrive in two days.

"Cornell Crew Confident/ Collegiate Oarsmen Tramp in the Rain to Take Off Weight." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1903; Page 2.

This article talks about the Cornell crew team and the preparations for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as their expectations for how they will do.

"Cornell Crew Crippled/ Courtney Admits That Coffin Will Hardly Be Able to Row/ Oarsmen Finish Hard Work/ Yale Crew in Fine Condition for Thames Regatta on Thursday – Harvard Shows Improvement." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1904; Page 5.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie and New London regattas that will be occurring later in the week.

"Cornell Crew Favored For Big 'Varsity Race/ Heavy Betting on Result of Intercollegiate Regatta/ Crews Ready For Signal/ Six Colleges Will Be Represented at Poughkeepsie's Regatta – Preparations for Record-Breaking Crowd." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 28, 1905; Page 6.

Describes the atmosphere in Poughkeepsie before the big race. Cornell is considered to be the favorite, and this year there has been more bets wagered than in many years past. Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Columbia, and Georgetown have had practically no money bet on them; however there were many bets on whether Columbia would beat Pennsylvania. There is also short interviews of almost all the head coaches.

"Cornell Crew Improve/ Courtney, However, Dissatisfied, with Time Trial/ Hard Work For Columbia/ Harvard Makes Its Best Showing on the Thames – Light Work for Yale Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1904; Page 16.

This article discusses the time trial that Cornell undertook today, as well as the practices that the other teams have been participating in.

"Cornell Crew Light/ Coach Courtney Confident as Final Practice Starts." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1915; Page 17.

This article announces that Cornell has left for Poughkeepsie. The crew this year is light and Coach Courtney has a lot of confidence in them.

"Cornell Crew Picked/ All of Last Year's Veterans Give Place to New Men." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, April 19, 1909; Page 7.

The Cornell coach has picked his varsity crew members, and they most likely will be the same members that will participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Cornell Crew Quits The Oaks, Poughkeepsie Home Since '97." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 12, 1924; Page 23.

This article announces that Cornell will not be staying at the establishment in Poughkeepsie they have stayed at since 1897.

"Cornell Crew Selected/ Heavy 'Varsity to Row in Main Race, Light Eight in Junior." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1920; Page 14.

Despite the rain, all of the crews were able to go out for their regular practice, and Coach Courtney has finally chosen his lineup, with the heavy eight rowing in the varsity race and the light eight rowing in the junior varsity race.

"Cornell Crew Shows Power and Fine Form In First Four-Mile Test at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, June 17, 1936; Page 32, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reports that Cornell had an excellent time trial today, and it is no question that they are the big contenders for the east coast. Navy and Washington also had good workouts, and all crews appear to be in good form.

"Cornell Crews Decided On." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 9, 1902; Page 3.

This article announces that Cornell will be sending a Varsity and a freshmen crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta that year. The article lists the men who will be participating on the teams, and what positions they will be rowing in.

"Cornell Crews Entrain/ Coach Wray Plans to Start Work On Hudson This Afternoon." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1927; Page 33.

This article reveals that the Cornell crew teams have boarded the train for Poughkeepsie and plan on having their first practice on the Hudson tomorrow afternoon.

"Cornell Crews Entrain/ Thirty Oarsmen Leave for Training Camp at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1924; Page 17.

This article announces that Cornell has boarded the trains for Poughkeepsie to begin training.

"Cornell Crews Join Columbia On Hudson/ Coaches Courtney and Rice Praise Each Other's Oarsmen's Work at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1912; Page 7.

This New York Times article announces that Cornell has joined Columbia on the Hudson to begin preparation for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Cornell Crews Leave For The Hudson Today/ To Join Other Eights at Poughkeepsie – Todd Replaces Katz in Varsity Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1928; Page 25.

This article announces that Cornell will be leaving tomorrow to join the other crews on the Hudson, as well as announcing changes in Cornell's crew lineups.

"Cornell Crews Made A Victorious Sweep/ Ithaca Oarsmen Won All Three Races at Poughkeepsie/ Freshmen Eight Set a New Record for Two-Mile Event – 'Varsity Eight First with Ease." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1903; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won all three races at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. A detailed account of each race is given. The atmosphere and size of the crowds at Poughkeepsie is also described.

"Cornell Crews May Sweep The Regatta/ Ithacans Willing to Wager Even Money That All Their Boats Finish First." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1910; Page 11.

This article discusses the belief that Cornell will be the victor for the Poughkeepsie Regatta in all the races. Columbia is thought to be a strong second place for the Varsity race. The article goes into further detail of why it is believed that those will be the final placements.

"Cornell Crews Win On Hudson/ Courtney's 'Varsity Eight First in Slashing Finish with Leland Stanford/ Syracuse Beats Freshmen/ Pacific Coast Oarsmen Were Big Surprise of a Big Rowing Day at Poughkeepsie/ Columbia Disappointing/ Rice's Charges Finish Fourth in Main Race, Third in Freshmen, Last in Junior." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1915; Page 10.

This article announces that Cornell won the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The article gives a detailed description of the race, describing how all the crews did, who was a surprise, who was a disappointment, and how the crews did in the junior varsity and freshmen races as well. It talks about the crowds and the happy party atmosphere of Poughkeepsie.

"Cornell Crews Win Two Hudson Races/ Courtney's Men Capture 'Varsity Eight and Four Oared Events at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1911; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won the two races of the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The article goes into detail about both of the races, describing how each of the teams fared, as well as describing the size of the crowds and their reactions to the races.

"Cornell Freshmen Crew Victorious/ Prevents Syracuse from Sweeping Regatta by Capturing Postponed Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1916; Page 12.

The announcement that Cornell won the freshmen race as well as a detailed description of the race.

"Cornell Freshmen Win/ Columbia Second and Pennsylvania Third in the Triangular Boat Race/ Cornell First; Time, 10:51 3-5. Columbia Second; Time, 11:12. Pennsylvania Third; Time, 11:13." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times, Jul. 3, 1989; Page 10.

This article announces that Cornell won the freshman race at Saratoga, and it gives a detailed description of how the race unfolded.

"Cornell Freshmen Won/ Pulled A Pretty Race Over The Poughkeepsie Course/ Harvard Was Second in the Freshmen Race, and with University of Pennsylvania's Young Rowers Gave the Victors a Hard Struggle – The First of the College Races Rowed in Disagreeable Weather, but Rowed Well – A Bad Start." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1896; Page 1.

This article announces that the Cornell Freshmen won the freshmen race at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. A detailed description of the race is given, including the seating arrangements of the crewmen, the atmosphere in Poughkeepsie, and the amount of spectators there were.

"Cornell Has A Fast Crew/ Did an Exhibition Mile Yesterday – Observations on the Work in the Other Boats." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1897; Page 5.

This article talks about the exhibition mile that Cornell held today, as well as the activities of some of the other crews on the Hudson.

"Cornell In Trial On Hudson Course/ Three Red and White Eights Show Smooth Coordination in Initial Test/ Heat Hinders Practices/ Temperature of 100 Degrees Forces Other Crews From River Until Late Afternoon." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1923; Page 15.

All of the Cornell eights went out for a time trial today on the Hudson, while all the other schools present held practice as well.

"Cornell Is The Favorite/ But Courtney Says His Crew Has Been Overrated – Good Work by the Columbia Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1902; Page 10.

This article discusses the crews participating in the Regatta and their potential for winning, Columbia and Cornell are especially mentioned.

"Cornell May Not Race/ Practice Period on Hudson Conflicts with Examinations." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 4, 1917; Page S2.

Cornell's start of term has been delayed two weeks, which is causing their exams to be two weeks later than normal. Because of this the practice period for the Regatta will interfere with Cornell's exams, and they may not enter.

"Cornell May Use Heavier Varsity/ Report That Courtney Considers Starting Other Crew in Place of Knight's." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1920; Page 20.

All of the coaches are making changes to their crew lineups, and there is even talk that Courtney may switch crews entirely and have his heavy crew row the varsity race rather than the lighter one.

"Cornell Oarsmen At Poughkeepsie/ Red Crews to Begin Practice on the Hudson Today – Rain Prevents Hikes/ Hope For Quiet Water/ Syracuse to Get Five More Men Who Were Detained by Examinations." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1925; Page 12.

This article announces that Cornell has arrived on the Hudson to begin practice for the Regatta. It was raining but most consider that a good thing, in the hopes that the rain will stop the winds and flatten out the water to have a smooth race day.

"Cornell Oarsmen Spring A Surprise/ Varsity Covers Four-Mile Course on Hudson in a Little Over Twenty Minutes." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1925; Page 18.

This article briefly relates what the colleges are doing to prepare for the Regatta and how they are looking.

"Cornell Oarsmen Swept The River/ Ithaca Crews Won All Three Races at Poughkeepsie/ Columbia Boats Were Third/ Superior Form of Courtney's Charges Apparent by the Easy Manner in Which They Won – Wisconsin Second." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1902; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell swept the Hudson River by winning all three races of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, with Wisconsin coming in second for the big Varsity race. Detailed accounts of the races are given, as well as the crowd reactions and atmosphere on the shore and on the observation train.

"Cornell Picked To Win/ Hanlan, However, Still Stand Up For Columbia/ Collegians and Sightseers Thronging Into Poughkeepsie for the Big Regatta Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 26, 1903; Page 2.

This article discusses the Regatta that will be held the next day, and who people are favoring to win. Cornell is considered to be the favorite by a wide margin this year, even among the colleges. There is considerable betting going on with some people even betting thousands of dollars on who will come in first, second, and third place. There were even bets on who would not come in second place. There is a quite a crowd attending this Regatta, with some yachts in the water to watch the event. Everyone is decked out in their schools' colors, and it appears that Columbia has the largest cheering section this year. The crews are apprehensive about the weather for the Regatta, seeing as it has been stormy all week, and there were white caps on the river that afternoon making practice impossible. There is a small chart in this article showing the betting odds.

"Cornell Picked To Win Three Races/ Columbia Strong Possibility in 'Varsity Eight, but Not in Freshmen Event." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1913; Page 10.

This New York Times article discusses the expectations for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Cornell is highly favored for all three races. Columbia is also considered to be a strong possibility for the Varsity event.

"Cornell to Oppose Race/ Ithacans Don't Want Rowing Contest for Second Eights at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 28, 1913; Page 12.

This article from the New York Times discusses how Cornell will oppose the idea of creating a second race for eights in the Poughkeepsie Regatta if the suggestion is made. The Ithacans do not believe that another race for eights adds anything to the Regatta, while the Varsity four-oared race is unique.

"Cornell Victorious In A Glorious Race/ Ithaca 'Varsity Won in Record Time for Four-Mile Course/ Columbia Crew Was Second/ Four-Oared Contest Also Went to Cornell – Great Crowd Saw Spectacular Boat Races at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 3, 1901; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won the Poughkeepsie Regatta in a great race. The article describes the races in detail, as well as the crowd reactions, and the goings-on and atmosphere in Poughkeepsie.

"Cornell Wins All Three Races/ Columbia's Game Effort in 'Varsity Big Feature of Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Records in Two Events/ Fine Conditions Prevail on Hudson Except Slightly Choppy Water for Early Contests." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, July 3, 1909; Page 5.

This article announces that Cornell was the big winner at this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. Not only did they win the Varsity race, but they won the freshmen eight and the Varsity four oared race. In addition, Cornell set new records for the four oared and the freshmen eight oared races. Their coach was, of course, very pleased. There was a good crowd at the Regatta this year. Every participating school had a good cheering section, and the observation train was full. The rest of the article briefly describes the day's events, and the pleasant atmosphere that the crowd had. This article has a brief program of the day's races.

"Cornell Wins Close Victory/ Columbia's Crew Is Only A Few Yards Away in a Sensational Finish/ Annapolis Takes Third/ Syracuse First in the 'Varsity Four-Oared Event at Poughkeepsie/ Wisconsin Freshmen Win/ New York Crews Get Fourth Place In The Two Minor Events – Middies Cheer Their Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 27, 1907; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta in an extremely close finish, with Columbia barely coming in second place. The finish was so close, in fact, that neither the crowd, nor the crews knew who had officially won, and they had to wait to hear the officials' final verdict. Never in the history of the Poughkeepsie Regatta has a finish been so close. Syracuse's shell, unfortunately, sank a quarter mile from the finish line and they finished in last for the big race. Syracuse won the four-oared varsity race, and Wisconsin easily won the freshmen race. Although Navy did not win any races, they were a crowd favorite, and many spectators commented that if their team could not win, they hoped Navy would.

"Cornell Wins Two College Boat Races/ Ithacans Wipe Out Last Year's Defeats at Poughkeepsie/ Record For 'Varsity Fours/ Syracuse Cut 17 Seconds from Old Figures – Crowds Witness Aquatic Carnival." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1905; Page 5.

This article announces that Cornell won the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as winning the Freshmen race. Syracuse won the four oared race. The article gives a detailed account of each race.

"Cornell Won't Force Issues/ Courtney Wants to Beat Old Rivals Before 4-Mile Rule is Changed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 10, 1915; Page 39.

This article discusses the fact that although Cornell is an advocate for shortening the Poughkeepsie Regatta, they are not going to push the issue because they want another chance to beat their rivals before the race is no longer four miles.

"Cornell's Fine Victory/ Won the Intercollegiate Boat Race After a Close Contest/ Harvard Made a Plucky Fight/ One of the Prettiest College Races Ever Rowed Before a Big Crowd and in Fast Time/ A Perfectly Clear Course Secured/ The Observation Train Crowded with Spectators That Could See the Oarsmen from Start to Finish." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York, TIMES, Jun. 27, 1896; Page 1.

This article describes the celebration that is going on in Poughkeepsie tonight in celebration of Cornell's big win. It also briefly mentions a discrepancy in the official times that were announced for each crew in the race.

"Cornell's Four Crews Leave For Their Camp on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1929; Page 28.

This article announces that Cornell has left for their boathouse on the Hudson River, as well as a few changes to the boating orders that have been made.

"Cornell's Many Oarsmen/ Substitutes to be Taken to Poughkeepsie Will Make Up a Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1896; Page 3.

Discusses how the Cornell crews are preparing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. It also lists who will be rowing in each boat, as well as all the substitutes that will also be going.

"Cornell's Oarsmen Busy/ The Men Are In Fine Condition And Expect To Win/ Will Try to Make a New Record in the Race to be Rowed at Poughkeepsie – Members of the Crew to Go to Their Old Quarters on June 10 – The Present Make-Up of the Crews That Are Practicing Daily on Lake Cayuga." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1896; Page 6.

As soon as it was announced that the Regatta bill was signed by the President, Cornell was out on the lake practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. A detailed description of their practice is given.

"Cornell's Rowing Policy/She Accepts Yale's Challenge Conditionally and Harvard's, Too, but has her own Preferences/Rowing Associated Wanted/Capt. Coleman favors an open Regatta Controlled by the Five Universities – Cornell may have two races to row." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, January 13, 1898; Page 4.

This article mentions the suggestion made by Cornell to form a rowing association made up of five colleges in order to promote the sport of rowing. These five colleges would participate in a Regatta that would be held yearly. It is believed that such an association would make it easier to arrange the time, date, and place of the races.

"Cornell's Third Victory/ Championship in College Aquatics Clinched by Yesterday's Race at Poughkeepsie/ Pennsylvania Was Swamped/ Columbia Rowed a Pretty Race at the Start, but Finished Eleven Lengths Behind Cornell – Threatening Weather, but Good Racing Water and Fair Attendance/ Cornell, first; time, 20:47 4-5. Columbia, second; time, 21:20 2-5. Pennsylvania did not finish." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 3, 1897; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won the Poughkeepsie Regatta, Columbia came in second, and Pennsylvania, who was swamped, did not even finish. The atmosphere prior to the race is described, the feelings of the spectators on the town, as well as the number of supporters for each crew.

Corum, M. W., "Cool Heads Score Over Callow Youth/ Husky Oarsmen Get Surprise of Their Lives When Navy Crew Shoots Over Line." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1925; Page 14.

This article congratulates Navy on winning the Poughkeepsie Regatta and beating Washington, as well as listing interesting and amusing moments from the Regatta.

"Courtney Is To Retire/ Coach of Cornell's Crews Will Quit at End of Season." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1916; Page 14.

This article announces that Coach Courtney of Cornell is to retire at the end of this year, a fact that is dampening the spirits of the Cornell crew team. It also mentions that Stanford has arrived to begin practice.

"Courtney Lightens Crew/ Shell at Poughkeepsie Not So Heavy as in Harvard and Yale Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1915; Page S4.

This article reveals that although Cornell has lost twice this season so far, they do not think they are out of the running for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Courtney has changed the members of the varsity crew, putting lighter men in the boat to make the crew faster.

"Courtney Picks Junior 'Varsity Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1914; Page 11.

This article announces that Coach Courtney has chosen his junior varsity crew for the Poughkeepsie Regatta and lists who they are and in what position they will be rowing.

"Courtney's Stand Favored At Yale/ Recommendation for Shorter Crew Races May Result in Abolition of Big Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 14, 1917; Page S2.

Charles Courtney, the famed Cornell coach is trying to shorten the Poughkeepsie Regatta from four miles to three miles and he has support from many areas. If he succeeds all of the big Regattas will be affected.

"Crew Captains Draw for Positions at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1921; Page 19.

The crew positions have been drawn for all three of the races at the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Crew Complacent After Its Victory/ Back-Slapping and Shouting Are Absent in theCalifornia Boathouse." New York TIMES, June 21, 1932; Page 29, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article explains how, although the California crew team was very happy to win the Poughkeepsie Regatta, they were still subdued because they knew this victory was just a step towards their ultimate goal of winning the Olympics. The article also has a short interview with the California coach Ky Ebright expressing his pride in his team and his confidence in their ability to go all the way.

"Crew Lanes Drawn for Poughkeepsie/Favored No. 1 Position Goes to Penn and No. 2 to Columbia Varsity/Cornell Will Be At No. 8/Champions Last Year in Difficult Place-Powerful Syracuse 8 to Be at 9," New York TIMES, May 21, 1931; Page 35, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article lists what positions every crew drew for all three races. It also discusses how Columbia had the best draws all around, scoring the No. 1 spot for the Junior Varsity race and the No. 2 spot for the Varsity race. It had been determined recently that the crews closest to the west bank of the Hudson River had the most favorable conditions out of any other spot, so they are now regarded as the prime spots to draw for race positions.

"Crew Practice On Hudson/ Hanlan Has Revolutionized the Table Fare of the Columbia Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1900; Page 7.

This article discusses the new diet that Hanlan has allowed the Columbia crewmen to have, which is basically anything they want as long as they stop eating when they are full, and why he has chosen this radically different method.

"Crew Race Entries May Equal Record/ Seven Likely to Row in the Varsity Event at Poughkeepsie Next Season." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 21, 1924; Page S4.

This article announces that if Navy enters the Poughkeepsie Regatta there will be record amount of entries in the Regatta with the exception of one field. It also discusses who else will be entering the Regatta.

"Crew Race June 24 At Poughkeepsie/ Intercollegiate Rowing Regatta Will Be Three Days After Harvard-Yale Races/ Eight Entries Expected/ Columbia, California, Washington, Penn, Navy, Wisconsin, Cornell and Syracuse in Line." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 31, 1929; Page 17.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be on June 24th and it lists who the expected participants in the Regatta will be.

"Crew Will Come East/ University of Washington Eight for Poughkeepsie in 1917." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 6, 1916; Page 10.

This article announces that Washington will be coming to Poughkeepsie next year for the Regatta because a wealthy railroad builder has guaranteed to pay for the crew's trip east.

"Crew Work Retarded/ Strong Tide and Rough Water Spoils Practice at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1914; Page 6.

This article talks about how the crews attempted to practice on the rough water of the Hudson.

"Crews All On Hudson/ Washington and Wisconsin Arrive at Poughkeepsie for Regatta Work." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1914; Page 11.

This article announces that all of the crews participating in the regatta are on the Hudson and gives brief explanations about what their activities have been as well as their practices.

"Crews All Working Well/ Poughkeepsie Oarsmen in Fine Trim for a Close Finish – Severe Discipline for Columbia's Freshmen Captain." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1902; Page 5.

This article talks about the last minute practices that crews are participating in with only four days before the Regatta, as well as what they are going through emotionally.

"Crews Are Active Along the Hudson/ Five Colleges Break Usual Sunday Quiet to Take Conditioning Paddles/ Yale and Harvard Rest/ Crimson's Squad Sails on Morgan's Corsair – Elis Go on Trip to Newport." New York TIMES, June 21, 1937; Page 24, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the chairman of the Poughkeepsie Regatta Committee, Peter H. Troy, will be entertaining all the coaches that night with a dinner at Foxhollow Farms. The article also describes the day's activities for all the crews. Although Sunday is usually a day of rest, even for the crews, some of the schools took their crews out for some light paddling and conditioning practice. Those schools that stayed in had their men relax and take it easy.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ All of the Eights Will Be on the Course This Week." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1914; Page S2.

This article lists the arrivals of some of the crews that will be rowing on the Hudson. It also talks about where some of the crews will be staying, and what some of the crews will be doing for their first activities.

"The Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Changes in the Columbia Freshmen Boat – Lehmann Praises the Harvard 'Varsity Men." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1897; Page 3.

Discusses the types of practices the crews at Poughkeepsie have had, how they're doing, and what the weather has been like.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Columbia and Penn Oarsmen Experience Rough Water on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1901; Page 8.

This article lists what has been done to prepare for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Columbia's Webb Boat Not Well Adapted to the Work – Referee Not Yet Chosen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1897; Page 5.

This article discusses the activities and the health of the crews at Poughkeepsie.

"The Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Columbia Men Rested Yesterday – Discussion as to the Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1899; Page 8.

This article talks about the crews at Poughkeepsie and what they did for practice yesterday as well as their upcoming schedule.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Columbia Oarsmen First to Arrive for Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1908; Page 8.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived on the Hudson River to begin practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Cornell Crew Men Firm in Their Objection to Francis Rowing in the Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1901; Page 8.

Cornell crews held practice today in preparation for the Regatta, and the controversy about Francis Jr. rowing for Cornell in the single sculls race continues.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Cornell Crewmen Object to Charles Francis, Jr., Rowing/ Columbia Oarsmen Go Stale/ Coach Hanlan Keeps 'Varsity Eight Out of the Boat – Penn Rows in Slow Time." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1901; Page 3.

This article talks about the crews that are on the Hudson practicing for the Regatta, as well as discussing the Cornell crewmen's objections to Charles Francis, Jr., a diplomat's son, rowing for them in the Regatta. It reviews some boating changes that have been made, as well as practice routines a few crews undertook.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Cornell's 'Varsity Rows the Four Miles in Good Time – Francis Case Not Settled." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1901; Page 8.

Cornell held a time trial today and the article reviews how they performed. It also briefly mentions how some of the other crews have been doing as well as discussing the controversy of the Cornell men's objection to a diplomat's son representing them in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Crews at Poughkeepsie Engage in Double Drills/ Syracuse Oarsmen Hold Double Drills/ Coach Ten Eyck orders two long sessions for Orange Eights on the Hudson/ Other Crews also active/ Columbia and Penn have morning and afternoon workouts – Callow shifts cub boating/ Columbia Charters Boat." New York TIMES, June 13, 1930; Page 21, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the pre-race practices and trials that some of the coaches were having their crews do to get them ready for the Regatta. It's a good example of how important the Regatta was to the participants, because the coaches would drill their crews to the very end. The article also mentions how there is less space available on the observation train because of the number of crews competing in the Regatta, and therefore Columbia decided to Charter a boat for its fans.

The Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Figures of the Best Time Rows – The Wisconsin Crew Very Fast and Is Puzzling the Experts." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1899; Page 6.

Reviews the crews that are training at Poughkeepsie, results of time trials, opinions on how the crews are performing and their chances in the Regatta, and what sort of practices they've been having.

"Crews at Poughkeepsie/ Hanlan Makes Another Change in Columbia Freshmen Boat/ Former Stroke Briggs of Cornell Says It Is Impossible to Pick Winner." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1903; Page 5.

This article discusses changes that were made in the Columbia crew line-up, as well as the how all the crews have been preparing for the Regatta.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Marked Openness of the Big College Race on Saturday/ Short Preliminary Practice/ Cornell, Columbia, and Wisconsin Favorites Just Now at the Hudson River Headquarters." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1902; Page 3.

This article discusses how events are developing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as the outlook for the crews. Cornell is widely considered to be the favorite.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Oarsmen Enter Last Stage of Training for Tuesday's Regatta/ Six Eights For 'Varsity Race/ Columbia, Wisconsin, and Cornell Equal Favorites So Far in the Main Contest – Description of the Strokes." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1901; Page 9.

This article talks about the three crews that are considered the favorites for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, which are Columbia, Wisconsin, and Cornell.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Rough Water Again Interferes with Morning Practice/ Columbia Crews In Brushes/ Local 'Varsity Beat Freshmen in a Two-Mile – Changes Made in 'Varsity Four." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1901; Page 10.

This article talks about how the weather has been interfering with the crews' practices on the Hudson.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Sunday Spent in Idleness or in Exchanging Visits at the Different Boathouses/ Columbia Men Satisfied/ Mr. Courtney Believes He Could Furnish a Duplicate Victorious Crew – Status of the Eights – George Mumford Will Probably be Referee." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1897; Page 5.

This article discusses the activities of the crews on this quiet Sunday. It describes the crews' conditions both physically and mentally.

"Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Wisconsin and Columbia Oarsmen Join Penn's Contingent on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1903; Page 2.

This article reveals that the poor weather has persisted at Poughkeepsie, making practice difficult. In addition, Wisconsin and Columbia have joined Pennsylvania on the Hudson to prepare for the Regatta.

"Crews Await Race Day/ Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie Will Do No More Hard Work for Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1915; Page 10.

This article announces that the hard work for all the crews is done and they will only participate in light practices from now until the Regatta.

"Crews Await Start Of College Regatta/ Fifteen Eights From Six Universities Assembled for Three Races Today/ Last-Minute Shifts Made/ Columbia and Cornell Make Changes – Schulde to Row With Infected Hand/ Washington Is Favored." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1924; Page 14.

This article talks about the Poughkeepsie Regatta the day before the race, who the favorites are and why, the last minute practices that the coaches' held, the amount of spectators that are expected, and everything else that makes up the Regatta.

"Crews Await The Word/ College Oarsmen Trained and Eager for To-Day's Race/ Contest A Very Open One/ Men Have Suffered from Heat – but All Hold Their Condition – Crowd at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 2, 1901; Page 5.

Discusses the confidence level of the crews the day before the race. Each crew's strengths are talked about, and what they feel their chances of winning are. The crew that everyone feels they know the least about is Wisconsin; nobody knows how to expect them to perform.

"Crews draw lanes for Hudson Races/Columbia, 1929 Poughkeepsie Champion, Assigned to No. 9 Near Center of River/22 Eights are Entered/Flotilla for Varsity, Junior Varsity, and Freshman Events equals record set last year," New York TIMES, June 4, 1930; Page 23, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article shows the lane assignments for all crews for all three races. The officials for the races are named, and it is announced that the race is going to try to stick to schedule this year so that it will not end in darkness as it did last year. It also discusses how there are just as many crews entered as last years record setting numbers. It also mentions how the No. 2 lane is considered to be lucky.

"Crews Draw Positions/ Representatives of Columbia, Cornell, Georgetown, Syracuse, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania Meet." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1903; Page 8.

This article announces the positions that the crews participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta drew today.

"Crews for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, December 22, 1902; Page 10.

This article briefly discusses that the next Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on June 26th and that 18 crews will participate in the races. This is an increase in the amount of crews, and the reason is because Wisconsin and Syracuse are entering crews in the Varsity four-oared contest. The article also lists all schools that have crews entered in the Varsity eight-oared, Varsity four-oared, and the freshmen eight-oared contests.

"Crews Get Lanes For Poughkeepsie/ 30 Eights From 11 Colleges Draw Positions for Three Races on June 22." New York TIMES, June 10, 1948; Page 33, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces what lanes were drawn for the Poughkeepsie Regatta by which schools. Ironically the two top Eastern schools, Navy and Cornell will be racing with one lane between them on the western shore of the Hudson, and the two top contenders of the West Coast, Washington and California, will be racing with one lane between them on the eastern side of the river.

"Crews Have Spins On Regatta Course/ Oarsmen Take Advantage of Good Weather Conditions at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1922; Page 23.

All crews had a long workout on the river today, and they all looked to be in excellent form. The coaches of the other crews were disappointed that Cornell's time trial had to be postponed due to a broken oar.

"Crews In Rough Water/ Wind and Steamboat Make Rowing at Poughkeepsie Hazardous." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1914; Page 10.

This article describes the effects of the rough Hudson water on the crews trying to practice.

"Crews On Hudson Ease Up In Work/ Put in Dull Day, but Face Stern Tasks This Week for Race Preparation/ Cornell Has Late Drill/ California, Columbia, Penn, Navy and Syracuse Fail to Extend Themselves." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1929; Page S3.

This article describes how all the crews on the Hudson had a light workout today, to prepare them for the last week of hard training before the Regatta.

"Crews On Hudson Have A Light Day/ Only Navy and Syracuse Out in Morning on Account of Rough Water/ Jim Rice Suffers Setback/ Freshmen Stroke Out of Boat Because of Illness – Cornell Due Tomorrow." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1925; Page S3.

This article reports that the crews that were in Poughkeepsie for training had a light day of practice. It also gives the author's opinion of how the crews will do in the Regatta.

"Crews On Hudson Hit By Heat Wave/ Columbia and Penn Oarsmen Suffer Skin Infections – Hold Only Light Workouts." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1925; Page 17.

This article reveals that the blistering heat has caused Columbia and Pennsylvania, the two crews that are on the Hudson practicing, to stop practice to tend to their crews skin infections from the heat. They will only have light workouts for awhile.

"Crews On Hudson Hold Late Trials/ California Varsity Clocked in 19:19 – Coxswains Shifted in Washington Shells/ Harvard Covers Course/ Caught in 20:59 at New London – Yale Oarsmen Take Long Paddles on the Thames." New York TIMES, June 20, 1937; Sec. 5, Page 3, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the activities of all the schools participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. Rough waters kept most crews off the water early in the day, but later on things cleared up and several short practices and some time trials were held. California had a time trial for the 4-mile and came in at 19:19. Washington's coach switched the coxswain of his varsity and junior varsity, citing experience as the reason.

"Crews On The Hudson/ Columbia 'Varsity and Freshmen in a Hard Three-Mile Race/ Freshmen Crew Shaken Up/ Wisconsin Youngsters Give the 'Varsity a Tussle and Beat Them in a Mile Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1900; Page 8.

This article discusses the practice routine of Columbia and Wisconsin, as well as announcing that Pennsylvania has arrived on the Hudson, and Cornell is due to arrive tonight.

"Crews On The Hudson/ Columbia's Freshmen Eight Was Given Another Shaking Up/ Penn Rows Over The Course/ The Freshmen All Round Had Much Cause for Self-Congratulation After the Evening Practice." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1900; Page 8.

This article talks about all the practice routines that each school held today, as well as more changes that Hanlan made in Columbia's freshmen crew.

"Crews On The Hudson/ Georgetown Is On the River and Once Again Calculations on the Race Are Upset." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1900; Page 2.

This article discusses how the crews are performing, and who people expect to win the Regatta, although judging who the favorites are did become more complicated now that Georgetown has arrived on the Regatta.

"Crews on the Hudson/ In the Drawings for Positions for the 'Varsity Eight Race Columbia Drew the Outside Course/ Trains for the Poughkeepsie Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 29, 1900; Page 2.

This article announces the results of some of the time trials that were held by crews to prepare for the Regatta, as well as the results of the lane drawings. Wisconsin did well in their practice runs, making Cornell very nervous about them. Pennsylvania, on the other hand, did their trial runs in the middle of the hottest day that Poughkeepsie had seen yet, and therefore did very poorly. It is unclear why the coach had his crew practice then. The article also announces the lane assignments for all three races, as well as the colors of each team so they can be identified on the river. The article also mentions that there are still seats available on the special observation train if people wish to purchase them.

"Crews On The Hudson/ Very Little Hard Rowing Was Done – One of Penn's Oarsmen Sprained His Ankle Badly." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1900; Page 8.

This article talks about the condition the crews are in now that the Regatta is only a few days off, it also briefly discusses the practices that a few of the crews held despite the rough conditions on the river.

"Crews On Hudson Well Matched/ Any One Has a Chance to Win Big Race in the Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1914; Page S3.

This article briefly describes the practice routines that the crews on the Hudson hold, as well as a brief description of the crews themselves and how they are expected to perform. The conclusion is that all of the crews are equally matched and it will be anyone's race.

"Crews' Places Decided/ Positions for Great Regatta at Poughkeepsie Drawn For and Officials Chosen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1901; Page 7.

This article announces the lanes that the crews drew for each race of the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Crews Ready For Final Week's Work/ College Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie Are Evenly Matched For Races/ Hard To Pick Winners/ Syracuse Likely to Lead for Varsity Fours – Varsity and Freshmen Eights Very Even." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1908; Page 8.

This article discusses the expectations for each crew that is participating in the Regatta as they enter their final week of practice.

"Crews, Ready For Race, Mark Time/ College Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie to Have Only Easy Practice Until Saturday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1916; Page 13.

This article discusses the activities of the crews on the Hudson, a few days before the Regatta. They will only have light practices from here on out, the hard work is over. The article also discusses the amount of people that visited the crews today, and who they were.

"Crews Records' in Previous Intercollegiate Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1922; Page 15.

This article lists all the crews that have ever participated in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and how many times they came in what position, as well as the current course records.

"Crews Rest At Poughkeepsie/ Pennsylvania and Columbia Oarsmen Keep Their Shells Housed All Days." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1901; Page 4.

This article tells how the crews on the Hudson spent their Sunday away from practice, and the preparations that are being made for the Regatta.

"Crews Row In Fast Time/ Ward's Figures for the Quakers a Surprise – Columbia Improves and the Freshmen Are Shaken Up." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1903; Page 9.

This article discusses what the crews of each school has been doing to prepare for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Crews Row Over Course/ Columbia Oarsmen First in Training Quarters, Have Light Practice." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 30, 1916; Page 11.

This article briefly mentions that Columbia held a light practice on the Hudson.

"Crews Row Time Trials/ No Official Figures Announced, but Coaches Seem Pleased with Results." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1914; Page S2.

This article discusses the time trials that many of the crews participated in today and their coaches' reaction to them.

"Crews To Clash On Hudson Today/ Six Varsity Eights Ready for Annual Rowing Classic at Poughkeepsie/ Big Crowd To See Regatta/ More Than 50,000 Expected to Witness Struggle for Supremacy – Navy Rules Favorite." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1922; Page 15.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta that has arrived. Poughkeepsie is charged with excitement and a very large crowd is expected to attend. There is speculation on how the crews will perform in all three of the races, as well as whom the winners will be.

"Crews To Compete On Hudson June 29/ Seven Outsiders Get Invitations to Row at Poughkeepsie – No Distance Changes/ Washington Asked Again/ Navy, California, Wisconsin, Stanford, Princeton and M.I.T. Also – Races Will Start Earlier." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 13, 1927; Page 31.

This article announces the date that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be rowed at, as well as what schools will be invited to participate this year.

"Crippled Huskies Row In 14M. 16S./ Fast Time Trial of Far Western Eight, With Luft in Hospital, Pleases Callow/ Penn Has Examinations/ Wisconsin Makes Shifts in Crews – Rain Interferes With Practice at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1924; Page 27.

This article reveals how Washington did on their time trial, as well as changes Wisconsin has made in the seating arrangements of their crews. It also gives predictions for how well the crews will do in the Regatta.

"Cruise to Poughkeepsie Regatta Approaches." New York TIMES, May 31, 1936; Sec. 5, Page 5, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is designed for those people who ride their boats up or down the Hudson River to watch the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The article gives directions on how to have a fast, safe, fun trip on the Hudson to Poughkeepsie.

"Cub Crews Earns Trip/ Washington Freshmen Will Row at Poughkeepsie Again." New York TIMES, May 28, 1948; Page 32, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Washington freshmen crew team will be going to the Poughkeepsie Regatta to defend their title from last year. Head coach Al Ulbrickson recommended sending the cubs and the faculty athletic committee approved the recommendation, despite the fact that it is not the school's policy to send the freshmen every year.

"Curtiss Regatta Referee/ Heads List of Officials Chosen for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1921; Page 21.

The list of officials for the Poughkeepsie regatta has been posted, with Julian Curtiss heading the list as the referee.

"Curtiss To Referee Poughkeepsie Races/ Veteran Yale Official Will Be in Charge of Crew Classic – Arrival Dates Are Set." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1926; Page 11.

This article announces that Julian Curtiss will be the referee again for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and that Wisconsin will only be sending one crew.

Daley, Arthur J., "Phantom Boat Race Enlivens Day For Onlookers at Poughkeepsie/ Train Rumbles Along Course, Every One Peers Out in Midstream, But Nothing Happens on River – Tide and Wind Make Handicap Affair of the Varsity Engagement." New York TIMES, June 23, 1937; Page 31, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts some amusing stories and interesting bits of information about the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. This year there was a phantom boat race. Because of the rain the Freshmen race was delayed an hour, however for some reason the observation train took off and started toward the finish line anyway. The train is always the signal to the onlookers that the race has begun, so when the train began to move, everyone got to their feet and strained their eyes for a look at the race, except there was nothing to see. The article also mentions that one spectator watched all three races through a periscope, even though there was nobody standing in front of him. These are just two examples of the amusing and interesting stories that are related in this article.

Daley, Arthur J., "Regatta Fans Seek Dry Vantage Point/ Hills Along Hudson Deserted – Gay Garb of Other Years Replaced by Rain Clothes/ New Face Seen At Races/ Vendor Appears With Second-Hand Overcoats – Hume's Streak Is Broken." New York TIMES, June 28, 1938; Page 13, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts how this year there was a record breaking low in the amount of spectators who came to see the Regatta this year. The shore, which in the past has held over 100,000 spectators, only had 10,000, and there were even less people on the observation train and fewer yachts this year. It has rained before at Regatta's, but usually in spurts, and not the heavy, steady, downpour of today. There even was a man peddling second hand overcoats. It still was an excellent race, and the only taste of disappointment was the first loss after a 12 race winning streak for the outstanding stroke of the Huskies Don Hume. There are three charts and two pictures on this page.

Daley, Arthur J. "Syracuse Sweeps Minor Crew Races/ Takes Thrilling Junior Varsity Event, Defeating California by Length and an Eighth/ Time for 3 Miles 15:41/ Orange Leads Navy in Freshman Test by 1 ½ Lengths, Covering Two Miles in 10:59." New York TIMES, June 21, 1932; Page 29, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article gives a brief account of the results of the Junior Varsity and freshmen races, as well as a brief description of how those races played out. Syracuse won both the Junior Varsity and the freshmen races.

Danzig, Allison, "California Varsity Crew Triumphs At Poughkeepsie/ Washington is 2D/ Huskies Close to Sweep With Their Freshmen and Jayvees First/ Storms Upset Program/ California Varsity Wins 3-Mile Row by 2/3-Length Margin – Cornell 3d and Navy 4th." New York TIMES, June 26, 1949; Section 5, Page 1, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California won that year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. Washington came in second place, and Cornell came in third. The West dominated the races again today, with Washington winning the freshmen and Junior Varsity races. The weather was terrible. It down poured for most of the day, and visibility was very poor. The races were continually delayed, and the Varsity race ended up going before the Junior Varsity. The rest of the article describes in more detail how the Varsity race played out.

Danzig, Allison, "Four-Crew Battle Looms On Hudson/ Washington, California, Navy and Cornell Rated Best of Poughkeepsie Eights." New York TIMES, June 22, 1948; Page 33, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the Regatta that will be held the next day. The favorites are considered to be, in no particular order, Navy, Cornell, Washington, and California. Princeton is also considered to have a shot at winning the Regatta. There has been much talk that Poughkeepsie will no longer be the host of the Regatta, and that Seattle, with its roomy crew quarters is being looked upon with interest. The citizens of Poughkeepsie are trying to stir up the pre-war interest in the Regatta to keep this from happening. They are hosting a series of events, including a parade, dinners, dances, and the crowning of the Regatta queen.

Danzig, Allison, "Navy Crew Beats Cornell In Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Huskies Are Third/ Navy Varsity Wins From Cornell by Less Than ½ Length on Hudson/ California Eight Fourth/ Jayvee Race Annexed by Bear's – Washington Cubs Victor's as Regatta Is Revived." New York TIMES, June 22, 1947; Section 5, Page 1, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy broke the winning streak of the Western crews and won the Poughkeepsie Regatta, with Cornell following in a very close second. Washington was in third, California fourth and Princeton came in fifth. Washington started out the day by winning the freshmen race, and California took the jayvee race. The varsity race was a very hard fought battle; both Navy and Cornell rowed brilliantly, and they clearly out-rowed the Western crews in this race. The weather was beautiful, but there was not a very large crowd at this Regatta. This was partially due to the lack of the observation train. The remainder of the article gives a more detailed account of the Varsity race. This article has one picture.

Danzig, Allison, "Navy Varsity Rated Crew to Beat In Regatta at Poughkeepsie Today/ Cornell, Princeton Eights Also Strong Rivals of Washington, California – 29 Shells to Compete in Three Races on Hudson." New York TIMES, June 21, 1947; Page 12, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta that will be taking place tomorrow. For the first time in years an Eastern crew is regarded as the crew to beat. Navy has a big and powerful crew, which will put them at a big advantage if there is bad weather. Washington and California are still considered to be big contenders, but there are several crews from the east this year that will give them a run for their money. There will be no observation train this year, due to the war, and that has put a damper on the race. In addition, there does not seem to be as much excitement about the Regatta as there has been in previous years.

Danzig, Allison., "Poughkeepsie Race Off Next Year, But Decision on 1947 Is Delayed/ College Sports Continue Return to Normal, Princeton Getting Heptagonal Track and Annapolis Eastern Golf." New York TIMES, December 14, 1945; Page 21, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses how College sports are slowly coming back to normal in post-war America, but they are not rushing to get things back to the way they were. Rowing will begin again this spring, but it was decided that there will be no Poughkeepsie Regatta for the spring of 1946, and no decision has been made for 1947. There has been no Poughkeepsie Regatta held since 1941. One of the biggest factors in the Regatta's absence has been the ability to transport shells, since most of the trains were disassembled to be used for the war effort, and that is still an issue this year. There will be a very short race held on the Severn, and Navy will be providing all the equipment to participating schools. This will hopefully start to get America's rowing schools back into physical and mental shape to resume the Poughkeepsie Regatta soon.

Danzig, Allison, "Poughkeepsie Regatta Set June 25; Observation Train May Roll Again/ Efforts to Have Spectators Follow Crews by Rail Disclosed at College Parley – Hockey Group Decries Rough Play." New York TIMES, December 15, 1948; Page 50, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held next year on June 25th, which is a Saturday, and there is a hope that the observation train may run this year. Nothing is guaranteed, but there is now room for hope that a new train can be assembled so spectators can watch the Regatta from the moving stadium. The times for the races are tentatively set at 4:00 p.m. for the freshmen race, Junior Varsity at 4:45, and Varsity at 5:30 p.m. These times are earlier than normal, and may be pushed back. It was also decided that there should be a color scheme developed so that spectators can identify which crews are which while they are on the river.

Danzig, Allison, "Rowing Stewards Vote Against Shifting Lanes at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, June 20, 1947; Page 24, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the upcoming Regatta. The Western crews are, as usual, looked upon as potential winners, but unlike previous years, they are not looked upon as unbeatable. Many people feel that the East has a very good chance to win the Regatta. Navy, Cornell, and Princeton have all made the best impression out of all the Eastern eights. The article also mentions that the Board of Stewards rejected the request of many of the coaches that all of the crews be moved into the middle of the river. Some coaches fear that the crews closest to the banks will be handicapped by the wind, and the ones in the middle of the river will have an unfair advantage.

Danzig, Allison, "Washington's Oarsmen Make First Sweep of Poughkeepsie Regatta Since 1937/ Huskies Dominate Races On Hudson/ Washington Crews Annex All Three Events in Regatta by Two Lengths or Better/ California Second Twice/ Nips Navy Varsity, Which Takes Third, by a Foot – Runner-Up Also in Jayvee Contest." New York TIMES, June 23, 1948; Page 34, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the University of Washington swept the Poughkeepsie Regatta, an accomplishment that hadn't happened since 1937, ironically by the Huskies. California came in second in the big race, coming from behind to just beat Navy out. M.I.T. had an excellent day, coming in fifth in the varsity race, and fourth in the freshmen. This was a wonderful improvement from a team that has consistently come in last place. Washington never really had a fight for any of the races; they took command very easily. The conditions were great for racing, although not good enough to set any course records. There was a good crowd of spectators watching the Regatta, despite the fact that there was no observation train yet again. This article has one picture and one chart.

"Date for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, January 26, 1904; Page 10.

The Executive Committee of the Intercollegiate Association met and decided that the date of the next Poughkeepsie Regatta will be June 27th.

"Date for Renewal of Poughkeepsie Regatta Due to Be Set Today at Steward's Meeting." New York TIMES, January 24, 1934; Page 23, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the meeting of the board of stewards will be held today, and all members of the board will be in attendance. The main point of discussion at the meeting will be whether to resume the Poughkeepsie Regatta after the year off last year due to financial difficulties. Although there has been some discussion about postponing the regatta again, it is expected that the board of stewards will set a date for the regatta, regardless of how many crews are expected to attend.

"Declines To Make Comment/ Cornell's Rowing Representative to Await Stewards' Meeting." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 9, 1921; Page 21.

Cornell's representative to the intercollegiate regatta is not commenting yet on the possibility of there being no observation train, however it is believed by many that he will still favor the race to be held at Poughkeepsie, for this year at least.

"Declines 'Varsity Seat/ Captain of Penn Crew Says Present Bow is Better Oarsman." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1916; Page 12.

This article commends the captain of the Pennsylvania crews for turning down a position in the varsity boat because he believed the man already there was better than he. It was a great example of sportsmanship, and all crews on the Hudson admired it. The article also briefly mentions what the weather and practice conditions have been like for the crews.

"Defer Regatta Decision/Action Probable This Week on Hudson River Classic." New York TIMES, April 19, 1942; Section 5, Page 3, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that no decision has been made on whether the Regatta will be moved from the Hudson River this year or not. It is believed that a decision will be made within the next couple of days. It is also believed that the Regatta may be moved up to be held at the beginning of June, rather than the end.

"Dirigible Will Follow Crews On Hudson at Regatta June 19." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1928; Page 24.

This article announces that a dirigible, along with the submarine chasers and cruisers will be at the Poughkeepsie Regatta to cheer the Navy crews on.

"Discuss Reducing Poughkeepsie Race/ Stewards of Intercollegiate Regatta Consider Clipping Mile from the Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 26, 1917; Page 6.

The Board of Stewards continues to discuss the possibility of reducing the Poughkeepsie Regatta to three miles, and in the meantime this article lists the dates and times of the next two regattas.

"Distance Of Crew Race Not Changed/ No Decision Yet Made as to Length of 1923 Intercollegiate Varsity Contest." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 3, 1923; Page 10.

As of right now the distance for the 1923 regatta is at three miles and no discussion has begun on changing it, however the subject is expected to come up at the next Board of Stewards meeting.

"Distances, Times of Starts And Lanes for Crew Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1924; Page 14.

This article lists the distances of each race, what time they will begin, and what lanes the crews have drawn for each race.

"Drastic Shift Is Made In Navy Crew/ Coach Glendon Orders King and Lee to Exchange Places in Midshipmen's Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1922; Page 22.

Navy's coach made some big changes in his boat today, and afterwards sent them out for two time trials. All the other colleges had workouts as well.

"Draw for Lanes in Intercollegiate Rowing Association Regatta Made Here/ 18 College Crews Draw Race Lanes/ Seven Varsity, Five J.V. and Six Freshmen Eights Will Row at Poughkeepsie/ 5 Boats Added to Fleet/ Hudson Flotilla Augmented by Two Washington and Three Syracuse Shells." New York TIMES, June 6, 1934; Page 29, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that there will be eighteen crews racing on the Hudson River in this years' Regatta. In addition, it also lists which teams drew which positions for all three races to be held. The article also reconfirms that rules that had been established in the early 30's, as to where in the river the race would be held, would still be in effect this year. The times for all the races are also listed. Finally, the article recounts how both Washington and Syracuse were on the river practicing as soon as their crews arrived in Poughkeepsie.

"Draw is Made for Intercollegiate Rowing Association Regatta on June 18/ California Crew Favored By Draw/ Golden Bears Get Lane No. 1, Adjacent to Washington in Poughkeepsie Regatta/ 16 Boats In Three Races/ Seven Varsity 4 Jayvee, 5 Freshman Eights Named – Navy Plebes Late Entry." New York TIMES, May 29, 1935; Page 29, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces what lanes each crew in each race drew. The favored positions, No. 1 and 2 went to California and Washington, in that order. This places the two rivals side by side, which will make for an exciting race. The race will be exciting for the spectators as well because these two teams will be closest to the observation train, and the spectators will have a good view to watch the rivals battle it out to the finish. Navy decided at the last minute to enter a freshman team, so they sent three teams to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. The article also announces the times that each race will be held at. There is one chart in this article.

"Drawings For Regatta/ Leland Stanford Gets Course No. 1 in Four-Mile Race on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 27, 1915; Page 9.

This article lists which lanes the crews drew for the Regatta, as well as the boating assignments for Columbia.

"Drills Are Lightened For Crews On Hudson/ Varsity Eights Slacken Work but Freshmen Are Sent Through Fast Time Trials." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1928; Page 141.

This article gives an update on how all the crews on the Hudson are doing, the shape they are in, and their practice routines.

"Dubious Of Shorter Race/ Many Syracuse Men Disapprove Three-Mile Regatta Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 11, 1917; Page S3.

Syracuse is disappointed the Regatta has been shortened to three miles and raises questions over whether shortening the race will really make a difference.

"Early Date For Regatta/ Cornell Favors June 17, Instead of July 1, for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 20, 1915; Page 9.

This article reveals that when the Board of Stewards meets to decide the date of the next Poughkeepsie Regatta Cornell will vote to have an earlier Regatta than normal.

"East and West Divide In First Two Races/ Columbia Freshmen Never Headed – Washington Junior Varsity Overpowers Penn." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1926; Page 15.

This article compares how the east coast schools did to the west coast schools in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"East Vs. West in Crew/Pacific Coast Oarsmen Aided by Extra Training, Says Reader." New York TIMES, July 5, 1941; Page 18, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is written by a disgruntled reader, who is upset that the West keeps winning the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and how their crews are looked upon as superior. He believes the reason the West has been so dominant and "superior" is because the West has a longer training period than the East. He believes that the stewards should dictate when training for the season can begin, so the East and the West can start at the same time, or the West should not be invited to the Regatta and have their own race on the West Coast. At the end of the article, the editor points out that there is already sectional races, and nobody can control the climate, so why punish the West because they have nice weather sooner than the East Coast does.

"Ebright Has Praise For Cornell's Crew/ Close Race With Well-Trained Boat Worth California's Long Trip Says Bear's Coach." New York TIMES, June 19, 1935; Page 25, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article has clips of interviews from several coaches. Ky Ebright of California praised his crew and Cornell's. He said that they had made the trip worthwhile. Several other coaches expressed satisfaction of the day's races, saying that it had been a credit to the sport of rowing. Everyone was looking forward to next year, claiming that if the freshmen and jayvee races were any indication, next year would be very exciting.

"Ebright Is Elated By Eight's Speed/ Bear Coach Doesn't Get Much Kick Out of Mere Victory – Has Won Five Races." New York TIMES, June 18, 1939; Section 5, Page 4, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts a short interview with Ky Ebright, the head coach of the California Bears, who's Varsity won the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. Ebright admitted that victories do not have as much of a thrill for him, this being his fifth in eleven years. However the new record that his boys set today is something that he is extremely proud of.

"Eight Colleges In Two Big Regattas/ Harvard and Yale on Thames Friday – Intercollegiates at Poughkeepsie Saturday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1913; Page S1.

This New York Times article discusses the two big regattas that will be held at the end of the week, the Poughkeepsie Regatta and the Yale-Harvard Regatta.

"Eligibility Rowing Rule/ Is Oarsmen Who Has Rowed in Four-Mile Race Barred from Junior Crew?" ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1915; Page 13.

This article discusses the new eligibility ruling for the junior varsity crew, and how it's effecting the crews at Poughkeepsie.

"Enter Hudson Regatta/ California to Send Varsity and Jayvees to Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, April 30, 1936; Page 26, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California will be sending two crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year; their varsity and jayvee crews.

"Even Money Rules Betting At Ithaca/ Cornell and Syracuse Eights Equal Favorites in 'Varsity and Junior Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1920; Page 13.

As the regatta draws near the crews put in a light workout today. Betting for the varsity and junior varsity races has remained steady, with a tie between Cornell and Syracuse for first in the varsity race. Preparations have been going smoothly in Ithaca, and it is expected that there will be plenty of seating for the spectators. The races will start with the freshmen at 6:00 o'clock.

"Expect Return To Four-Mile Race/ Rowing Officials May Lengthen Poughkeepsie Distance in 1923 or 1924, Is Belief/ Two Colleges In Favor/ Columbia and Syracuse Stewards Back Movement – Cornell Will Probably Fall Into Line Later." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 19, 1922; Page 101.

It is widely believed that next year the Poughkeepsie Regatta will return to the four mile distance. Currently the Board of Stewards are split in half over their opinion on the matter, but many believe that by next year Cornell will decide to back the four mile race. They are hopeful that the prestigious four mile distance will encourage more schools to enter a crew into the Regatta.

"Extra Boats For Regatta/ Day Line Will Send Two Special Steamers to Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1921; Page 23.

Two special steamers have been added to the fleet of boats that will be bringing people to watch the regatta tomorrow.

"Faith of Glendons Vindicated By Race/ Columbia Coaches Cheered by Triumph After Early Season Set-Backs/ Strategic Plan Followed/ Crew Rowed Race as Chartered Weeks Ago – Callow and Butler Quick to Praise Victors." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1927; Page 21.

This article praises Columbia for their well earned victory in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. It also expresses the praise and admiration of the coaches of all the other varsity teams.

Farrer, James. "The Man In The Boat Tells His Story/ Wild Hope and Despair and Fearful Fatigue Make Up the Few Glorious Minutes of a Four-Mile Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1928; Page 75.

This article is written by a former rower, and he describes in detail what it's like for all the oarsmen participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Fast Time For Cornell/ Courtney Admits the 'Varsity Went Four Miles in 19:05/ Willard Placed at Stroke in Columbia Freshmen Boat – Hard Practice Over at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1903; Page 8.

Cornell had an outstanding time trial, rowing 24 seconds faster than any other crew has to date. The article also briefly relates developments and practice routines for the other crews preparing for the Regatta.

"Fate of Regatta Up To Stewards/ West Shore Railroad Again Unwilling to Run Observation Train for Poughkeepsie Races/ Chairman Is Optimistic/ Bogue Confident That Matters Can Be Arranged Amicably – Shift to Ithaca Course Unlikely." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 12, 1922; Page 99.

Although the West Shore Railroad is not willing, yet again, to provide an observation train for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the Board of Stewards are confident they will be able to use the observation train from the Regatta at New London, as they did last year.

"Favor Return to Poughkeepsie For Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1920; Page 15.

It is an almost unanimous opinion that the intercollegiate regatta should return to Poughkeepsie next year.

"Favor Three-Mile Race/ Intercollegiate Rowing Association Likely to Adopt Short Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 7, 1914; Page 12.

This article discusses the possibility of shortening the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Favors Dropping College Regatta/ University of Pennsylvania Organ Advocates Abolition of Rowing Classic/ Proposes Dual Events/ Old Penn Declares War Offers a Chance to Eliminate Expensive Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES; Jan. 27, 1918; Page 24.

The University of Pennsylvania has suggested that the break in athletics due to the war brings an opportunity to end the Poughkeepsie Regatta, which they believe is very expensive for the schools and is undesirable because it is held after commencement. They believe dual regattas between the colleges that participated in the Poughkeepsie Regatta should be held instead.

"Favors Navy's Entrance/ Rowing Representative Wants Crew in Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 10, 1921; Page 17.

The new representative of the Navy Athletic Association is highly in favor of Navy participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta so there is a very good chance that it will happen.

"Final Home Drill For Cornell Crews/ Lueder's Men Will Leave Ithaca Tonight for Their Quarters at Poughkeepsie/ Oarsmen's Morale High/ Believe Two Varsity Boatloads Will Be Real Factors in Regatta – Emerson Back in Junior Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1926; Page S3.

This article announces that Cornell will be leaving for Poughkeepsie after one last drill on their home course.

"Final Tests Near For College Crews/ Columbia Eight to Leave for Cayuga Lake Tomorrow – Yale to Move Today/ Elis Go To Gales Ferry/ Harvard Follows to Red Top on Tuesday – Brodil to Lead Blue and White Yearlings at Ithaca." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1920; Page 96.

Columbia will be leaving tomorrow for Cayuga Lake, where the regatta will be held this year. Other schools will be following a week or two later.

"Fine Bid By East Is Promised Again/ Bright Chances Seen Against California's Veterans at Poughkeepsie Saturday/ Cornell Is Rated Strong/ Navy and Syracuse in Rowing Picture – Columbia Is Set – Wisconsin 'Dark Horse'." New York TIMES, June 11, 1939; Sec. 5, Page 3, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses what the predictions are for each crew on this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. California is widely considered the favorite, however the East is thought to have a strong chance of defeating the West again with Navy, Syracuse, and Cornell thought to all be contenders. The article also announces the times at which each race will begin. The Freshmen race will begin at 4, the Jayvee at 5, and the Varsity race will begin at 6 o'clock. It is also expected, since the East won the Regatta last year, that there will be a bigger crowd here to cheer the crews on than there has been in a few years. There are two pictures on this page.

"Finish Line Is Changed For Poughkeepsie Race." New York TIMES, May 28, 1947; Page 32, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Board of Stewards has chosen the finish line for the Poughkeepsie Regatta to be a few yards north of the Mid-Hudson Bridge. This will be a perfect vantage point because the high hills on both sides provide good spectator viewing.

"Five Columbia Crews Drill." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1925; Page 12.

This article discusses the drills the Columbia crews undertook to begin preparing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Five Crews For Poughkeepsie Race/ Small Field Will Start for Final College Rowing Classic Event of Year/ Outcome Is Uncertain/ Georgetown and Annapolis Eights Withdraw – Poor Condition of Cornell and Columbia Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1908; Page S2.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the amount of crews that will be involved, and the probability of each team winning.

"Four-Mile Race Too Long/ This is the Reason Why Navy Will Not Compete at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, December 7, 1909; Page 10.

This article announces that despite the previous announcement that Navy may be participating in the next Poughkeepsie Regatta, they will not. The reason being is that the Naval Academy believes that the four mile race is to strenuous for the Middies to race. With their strenuous academic schedule, and all the time the Academy spends training their men to play football, they do not have enough time to adequately train for the four mile race at Poughkeepsie. This would mean that Navy would consistently be beaten by the other colleges, and this would not look good on the crew or the Academy because the general consensus is that they should be good at all water sports.

"Four-Oar Crew Race To-Day/ Pennsylvania Is Favorite For the Contest Scheduled for This Morning." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 2, 1900; Page 5.

The Varsity four-oared race has been postponed until tomorrow. The favorites for the race are discussed in the article, as well as people's reactions to the recently ended Regatta.

"Four-Oared Race On Hudson Today/ Subs on Navy and Penn Squads to Battle Over Mile Course at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1926; Page 8.

This article announces that as a precursor to the Regatta tomorrow, four-oared crews will race on the Hudson today for the last mile of the Regatta course.

"Francis Is Out Of Race/ Cornell Student Withdrawn from Single Sculls by Father/ Contest Is Declared Off/ Boat Crew's Firm Opposition to Ambition of Diplomat's Son Prevails Over Athletic Council's Edict." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1901; Page 2.

This article announces that Francis, the diplomat's son who wanted to row in the single sculls race has been withdrawn due to strong objection from the Cornell oarsmen.

"Freshmen Await The Word/ Second Week of College Rowing Opens on the Poughkeepsie Course This Afternoon/ Columbia's Crew Favorite/ Cornell Lucky in Drawing for Position – Prospects of Disagreeable Weather and Rough Water – Officials of the Race and Make Up of the Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30 1897; Page 3.

This article discusses the race that will be held tomorrow, the weather, the positions that the crews drew, who the favorites are and why, who the officials will be, and all the members of each crew and the position they are rowing in.

"Freshmen To Race To-Day/ Opening Event of the Great College Rowing Regatta on the Poughkeepsie Course/ A Bad Scare For The Blue/ All the Yale Youngsters Were Sick Yesterday Morning, but They May Be Well Enough to Win the Race This Afternoon." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1897; Page 3.

This article discusses the freshmen race that is being held today, the number of followers each team has, and the expectations of how each crew will perform. It also mentions a scare that Yale suffered when many of their crew were sick this morning due to milk they had the night before, but by the early afternoon they had all improved.

"Fund To Send Crew East/ Stanford Students to Raise $7,000 for Track Team and Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 28, 1916; Page 13.

This article announces that the Stanford students are starting a campaign to raise $7,000 so they can send their varsity crew, as well as their track team east to compete.

Funke, Lewis B., "Sweepswingers/ For a thrill they never can explain the nine crews training for Poughkeepsie pay in special coin." New York TIMES, June 15, 1941; Section 7, Page 14; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is written about the crew members. It is a very brief synopsis of what each of the crew members go through to prepare for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and then an attempt at a description of how grueling and torturous the four miles in the Varsity race is, yet as the author notes, no matter how completely exhausting and painful the Poughkeepsie Regatta, each crew member would not miss it for the world, and they cannot even explain why. This article has many pictures with it.

Funke, Lewis B., "Sweepswingers – Swing." New York TIMES, June 16, 1940; Section 6, Page 10; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is a narrative of what the Poughkeepsie Regatta means to the crew members. The author recounts what it's like for the crew members to wait all day for the race, and finally what it feels like to race the four miles to the end of the race and how it takes everything out of every member of every crew. The author also describes what training is like for these men, what can go wrong during the race, and how everything must be working perfectly to have a chance at winning, and even then you need a little luck. The author really does a great job of giving the reader an oarsman's perspective of the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Future Of College Rowing/ Interesting Situation Results from Cornell's Victory over Yale and Harvard/ Favor Open Competition/ Many Think the Time Is Past for Exclusiveness in Aquatics – Prospects for This Week's Races of Cornell, Columbia, and Pennsylvania." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1897; Page 4.

This article discusses the question of whether college rowing should now be an open competition, or if it should still remain exclusive, as Yale wants it to remain. In addition, it also discusses Cornell's chances against Pennsylvania and Columbia next week.

"Gala Crowd Sees Regatta Pageant/ Poughkeepsie Strives Valiantly to Accommodate Influx Which Triples Its Population/ Record Fleet At Scene/ Is Dominated by U.S. Destroyer 241 – Palisades of River Are Densely Populated." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1929; Page 31.

This article tells what it was like to be a spectator at the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and all the things that they might have seen or heard.

"Geneva Wants Regatta/ Starts Movement to Bring Poughkeepsie Races to Seneca Lake." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 15, 1921; Page 20.

Geneva has petitioned the board of stewards to examine them as a possible location of holding the intercollegiate regatta.

"Georgetown Crew for Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 4, 1904; Page 7.

This article announces that Georgetown will be entering a four-oared crew in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Glendon Praises Washington Crew/ 'It Is Hardly Fair to Say That the Best Crew Won,' Says Navy Coach." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1925; Page 14.

This article reveals Glendon's praise for the Washington crew that they barely beat to win the Poughkeepsie Regatta. There are two charts in this article.

"Glendon Shakes Up His Yearling Crew/ Shifts Four Men to Columbia Freshmen Shell in Quest of More Power/ All Crews Now On River/ Washington Eights and Wisconsin Freshmen Oarsmen There – Dad Vail Not Optimistic." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1927; Page 22.

This article announces that Coach Glendon of Columbia has changed the seating in his freshmen crew again in hopes of gaining a better crew. It also mentions the practice routines of the other crews all preparing for the Regatta.

"College Crews At Work/ Cornell, Columbia, and Pennsylvania Practicing for This Week's Races on the Hudson/ Cornell's Record In Danger/ Time Made Last Friday Badly Beaten by the Pennsylvania 'Varsity Crew – Columbia's Men in Good Form, and Their Freshmen Especially Dangerous." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1897; Page 3.

This article discusses the three crews practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. All the crews look to be in fine shape, and it is the opinion of many that Columbia and Pennsylvania will easily beat the record set by Cornell in the Harvard-Yale race. Courtney is also confident that his crew will perform even better than they did last week, but he is concerned about his freshmen, especially since Columbia's freshmen are looking especially good.

"Haines Holds 4-Mile Trial; Says M.I.T. Will Not Be Last." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1929; Page 35.

This article reveals that the coach for the M.I.T. crew does not believe his crew will come in last at the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Hanlan Coaching Columbia/ The Professional Oarsman Insisted on Having Full Charge of All Practice of the Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1900; Page 8.

This article reveals that Edward Hanlan, the professional oarsman, will be taking over the training of the Columbia crews for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the Columbia oarsmen are very excited about this development.

"Hanlan Praises His Crew/ Columbia's Varsity Shows Up Strong in Time Row/ Cornell Oarsmen Appear Fully as Good as Last Year – Brush Between Pennsylvania and Wisconsin." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1903; Page 10.

This article discusses what the crews on the Hudson have been doing for practice, as well as changes that coaches have made in the crew lineup, and other preparations as well.

"Hard Week Ahead For Crews On The Hudson/ Cornell and Columbia Have Advantage in Being on Course the Earliest." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1912; Page C8.

This New York Times article discusses the week of practicing that all of the teams participating in the Regatta will be doing. The expectations for the race and crew performances are also discussed.

"Harding Invited To Regatta/ Poughkeepsie Mayor Extends Invitation on Behalf of City." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 25, 1921; Page 24.

President Harding was invited to the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and after examining the course the Board of Stewards have come up with a list of repairs that will be completed before June.

Harrison, James R., "Navy Crew Humbles Washington Huskies And Sets A Record/ Middie Varsity Leads Two-Time Champions by ¾ of a Length in 19:24 4-5 Before 50,000/ Wisconsin Finishes Third/ Penn, Cornell, Syracuse and Columbia Trail in First Four-Mile Race Since 1916/ Western Juniors Triumph/ Cornell Is Next and Quakers Third – Syracuse Captures Freshmen Race on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1925; Page 1.

This article announces that the Navy crew team won the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Detailed descriptions of each of the races are given as well as the results.

Harrison, James R., "Sports of the Times." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 2, 1927; Page 19.

This article discusses how the Eastern college coaches are looking forward to the Poughkeepsie Regatta because they have a very good chance of beating the dominant Western teams.

"Harvard and Penn May Row Princeton/ Tigers Looking for Another Triangular Regatta at Lake Carnegie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, January 7, 1912; Page C9.

This article announces that Princeton has made the decision not to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, or in any other Regatta for that matter. The reason for this is twofold. One reason is that the school does not feel that they will be able to raise enough money to have a good enough rowing program to train a team that will be able to make a good showing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The second reason is the size of the university. The school does not feel that it has a big enough pool from which to pick quality members for a good competing team.

"How Cornell Won/ Outstayed the Crimson Eight When the Final Struggle Came." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1896; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won the Poughkeepsie Regatta. A detailed description of the entire race, including the minutes prior to the start of the race, is given including the fans reactions to everything that was going on.

"How Crews Have Finished In Poughkeepsie Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1924; Page 14.

This is a very small chart that lists all crews that have participated in the Regatta and what positions they have come in, as well as the overall course records.

"How Crews Have Finished In Poughkeepsie Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1926; Page 11.

This is a chart that shows where each crew has placed in past Poughkeepsie Regattas, as well as course records.

"How The Race Was Rowed/ A Pretty Contest at the Start Soon Developed Into a Tame Procession." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 3, 1897; Page 2.

This article gives a detailed description of how the race proceeded, from the exciting start to a finish that was no contest.

"Hudson Crews On Edge/ Light Work the Rule in Every Camp This Week." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1916; Page 8.

This article briefly describes the demeanor and activities of all of the crews the last week before the race begins.

"Hudson Oarsmen Ready For Regatta/ Coaches Declare Their Crews Are All Fit for Intercollegiate Contests/ Cornell 'Varsity Favorite/ Syracuse Slightly Favored Over Columbia in Estimation of Public – Number of Visitors Small." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 2, 1909; Page 8.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta that will be happening the next day, the expectations and the schedule.

"Hudson Race Again To Be Four Miles/ Stewards Will Not Shorten Distance Until It Is Proved to be Injurious to Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 16, 1915; Page 10.

The Board of Stewards decided to keep the Poughkeepsie Regatta at four miles until it is proven that rowing that distance is injurious to the rowers. This year's Regatta will be held on June 28th.

"Hudson Regatta Changes/ Crews to Row Up Stream – Fours to Have Coxswains." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Nov. 22, 1908; Page S3.

There possibly will be some changes at next year's Regatta. Due to the tide, the race will be held in the opposite direction than it normally is, and they are also contemplating putting a coxswain into the four-oared shell.

"Hudson Regatta in Danger/ Cornell Supports Penn In Stand Against Poughkeepsie Classic." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 6, 1918; Page 10.

There are rumors that Cornell is also favoring to do away with the Poughkeepsie Regatta completely, and if Cornell stops rowing in the Regatta, the race will probably end altogether.

"Hudson Regatta In June/ Poughkeepsie Race to Be on 22d or 28th, Says Stevenson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 13, 1926; Page 23.

This article announces the date for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as mentioning that the four mile distance will be continued this year.

"Hudson Rowing Classic May Be Shifted/Officials Discuss Possible Transfer/Coast Guard Protection and Race Train Unobtainable at Poughkeepsie/Columbia To Row Today/Faces Rutgers in 3 Events on the Harlem – Navy Will Oppose Princeton." New York TIMES, April 18, 1942; Page 22, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that some of the Board of Stewards met unofficially to discuss possibly moving the site of the annual Regatta. One of the sites in consideration was Lake Onondaga at Syracuse. The two main factors that are thought to be blocking the transfer are the inability to have Coast Guard patrolling the pleasure craft, and no observation train. The members of the board who were not present will be contacted by phone, and it is expected that an announcement will be made soon about the decision.

"Hurt In Plane Crash On Regatta Course/ Five Rescued From Albany-New York Craft by Navy Coaches Off Poughkeepsie/ Machine Was Flying Low/ Two of Passengers in Critical Condition – Pilot Unable to Explain Accident." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1929; Page 1.

This article reports that a plane crashed into the Hudson river, injuring all the people inside, who were all rescued by the coaches of the Navy crew squads.

"Huskies' Crew to Get Award." New York TIMES, June 20, 1940; Page 31, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Huskies will be receiving the trophy for winning the Poughkeepsie Regatta tomorrow at the World's Fair Academy of Sport at 2:15.

"Huskies Expect Battle." New York TIMES, June 14, 1938; Page 27, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the championship Varsity, Junior Varsity, and freshmen teams all left for the Hudson today to defend their titles. Coach Al Ulbrickson mentioned that this year the Huskies are facing tougher squads than they have the past two years, and he feels that his teams are not as fine tuned as they were the last two years. He is expecting real challenges this year at the Regatta.

"Husky Oarsmen From Northwest Beat Navy Crew/ Washington Eight Is Stroked by Dow Walling, Who Rises From Sickbed to Row/ 50,000 At Poughkeepsie/ See Pacific Coast Freshmen Come Within Three Feet of Winning From Cornell Cubs/ Columbia 3D In Varsity/ New Yorkers Lead Syracuse, Cornell and Penn – Syracuse Takes Junior Varsity Event." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1923; Page 1.

The Washington Huskies, despite their injured stroke, became the first western crew to win the varsity race at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Navy came in second and Columbia came in third. The crowds loved every minute of the races, despite the rain that kept up all day. Cornell barely won the freshmen race ahead of Washington, and Syracuse won the junior varsity race. Detailed descriptions of all three races are given.

"Intercollegiate Boat Races To-Day/ The Georgetown Crew Has Got the Wise Ones Guessing/ Cornell Is The Favorite/ Second Place Is Generally Conceded to Lie Between Pennsylvania and Wisconsin – Columbia and Georgetown Eights." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1900; Page 2.

This article discusses the crews that are involved in the Poughkeepsie Regatta; the mystery of how Georgetown will perform, Columbia's confusion over the many different methods of sweeping that they have been taught, as well as comparing the different crews to each other.

"Intercollegiate Races/ Regatta of the Rowing Association Will Begin To-Morrow/ The Course On The Hudson/ Columbia, Cornell, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin Universities Will Be Represented – Personnel of Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1899; Page 6.

Discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta that is coming up, and the preparations for it, as well as the boating arrangements of some of the participating crews.

"Intercollegiate Regatta/ Arrangements for Races to Take Place at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1899; Page 4.

This article announces the times that the Poughkeepsie races will be held, when crews are scheduled to arrive, and the arrangements that have been made for the observation train.

"The Intercollegiate Regatta Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1905; Page 6.

This is a chart that lists all the crews and their seating assignments for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as the race records for all of the Intercollegiate Regattas up to the present.

"Intercollegiate Regatta/ The Freshmen Race to be Rowed on Wednesday, June 24." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 11, 1896; Page 6.

This article announces that the Freshmen race of the Intercollegiate Regatta will be held on June 24th, two days before the Varsity race. It also states the opinion that Poughkeepsie is likely to be the site chosen for the regatta.

"Intercollegiate Regatta/ Georgetown Has Decided to Enter a Crew for the Race on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1900; Page 8.

This article announces that Georgetown has changed their mind about entering a crew in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and will send one varsity eight.

"Intercollegiate Regatta/ Hudson River at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1914; Page 2.

This article acts as a post-race program for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, it lists the order the crews came in for the varsity race and their times as well as who rowed for each crew and in what position. It also has a chart that shows who won the varsity race for each year it has been held.

"Intercollegiate Regatta July 2." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 14, 1909; Page 10.

This article announces the change in the date of the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The change was made so that the crews could row downstream, rather than upstream.

"Intercollegiate Regatta Awarded to Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 12, 1923; Page 10.

It's been decided that this year's regatta will be held at Poughkeepsie once again.

"Intercollegiate Rowing/ Columbia Crews Arrive at Poughkeepsie – Others Expected Next Sunday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1900; Page 8.

This article announces that Columbia will arrive on the Hudson tomorrow to begin practice for the Regatta, the first of the crews to arrive. It also speculates as to why the crews have been so late in arriving for practice this year in comparison to other years.

"Intercollegiate Rowing Schedule." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 26, 1899; Page 4.

This article announces what dates the races of the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on.

"An International Contest/ American and English Methods Were on Trial, and the Yankee Style of Rowing Won." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1897; Page 2.

This article discusses how since Cornell won the race, the American style of rowing is perceived to be better than the English style of rowing that Yale and Harvard used.

"Invited To Row By Phone/ Columbia asks California to Compete in Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 15, 1916; Page 12.

This article relates that Columbia called California on the transcontinental phone and invited them to attend in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. California responded that they would be there if at all possible.

"I.R.A. Bars Brodil/ Oarsman Will Not Be Allowed to Row for Columbia This Season." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 13, 1920; Page 11.

The intercollegiate Rowing Association has barred Franklin Brodil from rowing for Columbia in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Ithaca May Get Hudson Regatta/ Lake Cayuga and June 24 Tentatively Chosen for Intercollegiate Races/ On Harvard-Yale Date/ Colleges Showing Tendency to Abolish Custom of Rowing Races on Neutral Waters." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 12, 1916; Page 9.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta may be held on Cayuga Lake this year, rather than the Hudson River. The main reason for this change is that the Railroad company has refused to run an observation train on June 30th or July 1st.

"Ithaca Regatta Will Be Rowed in Late Afternoon." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1920; Page 24.

The Intercollegiate Regatta, which will be held this year at Ithaca, will be held in the afternoon on June 19th.

"Jam To Cross The River/ Many at Poughkeepsie Miss Their Dinners as Result." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1929; Page 31.

This article reveals that there was a jam for people to get back across the river after the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and many people did not get back until late.

"Jayvee Mark Set By Huskies' Crew/ Washington Juniors Triumph Decisively in 13:44 – Navy Second and Cornell Third." New York TIMES, June 23, 1937; Page 31, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article briefly describes the Jayvee and freshmen races. Washington easily took command of both races, barely ever contending with anybody. The freshmen rowed beautifully and the Jayvees smashed the record set for the Jayvee course, coming in at 13:44. The previous record was 14:18 3/5, and set by Navy back in 1928.

"Joe Wright Reports A Fast Penn Trial/ Quaker Rowing Coach Times Red and Blue Varsity at 14:05 Over Three-Mile Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1922; Page 18.

Despite rough waters Washington made it out on the river for a very quick workout to limber the men up. Pennsylvania also made it out, although almost at bedtime, and had a successful time trail where the varsity soundly beat the junior varsity.

"Julian W. Curtiss Named Poughkeepsie Race Referee." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1922; Page 18.

Julian W. Curtiss has been named as the referee for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Julian W. Curtiss to Referee Crew Races at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 16, 1921; Page 20.

Julian Curtiss will be the referee for this year's Poughkeepsie regatta.

"June 22 Approved For Crew Classic/ Poughkeepsie Regatta Will Be Held Only Week Before the Olympic Trials." New York TIMES, April 9, 1948; Page 32, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on June 22nd this year, which only gives coaches a week to prepare their crews for the Olympic time trials, but it could not be helped. The freshmen race will kick things off at 5:30 p.m., with the Junior Varsity following at 6:00 and the Varsity race beginning at 6:45. Planners are trying to revive the observation train for this year's Regatta, but it is uncertain if the train will be able to come back.

"Keeping Eyes On Oarsmen/ Physical Condition Being Noted at All Stages of Training." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1915; Page 13.

This article reveals that the Board of Stewards will be closely watching the crews in the Regatta, both during practice and after the Regatta is over to determine if the four mile race is too strenuous for the crews.

Kelley, Robert F., "4 Penn Crews Hold 1st Spin On Hudson/ Callow Arrives and Varsity, Junior, Freshmen and Combination Eights Row Twice/ Columbia Also In Drill/ Squad Covers Eight Miles at Poughkeepsie – Slade Goes to No. 4 in Junior Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1929; Page 44.

This article describes some of the practices that crews undertook on the Hudson today, as well as reporting on Rusty Callow, who has an infected foot due to stepping on a rusty nail.

Kelley, Robert F., "18 Crews On Edge To Race Tomorrow/ Navy Finally Names Bullard to Row in Varsity – Walker Will Be Jayvee Stroke/ Western Eights Favored/ But Washington Faces Harder Task Than in 3-Race Sweeps of Last 2 Regattas." New York TIMES, June 26, 1938; Sec. 5, Page 3, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the activities of the crews the day before the Regatta. Nobody was having any sort of workout, instead allowing the crews to relax the day before the big day. Navy finally announced that Bullard was fit enough to row in the Regatta, and there is no doubt that Hume will be rowing as well. California and Washington are still considered the favorites, with Navy still thought of as the hope for the East. It is rumored that the President will be joining the spectators to watch the varsity race and six destroyers will be sailing up the Hudson to watch the big event. There are two pictures with this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "19 Crews In Races On Hudson Today/ Record Flotilla Will Close College Season With the Three Events at Poughkeepsie/ Navy Anxious For Victory/ But Washington Is Ready, and Other Six Rivals Will Fight Only for Third Place/ Columbia Freshmen Fit/ Stroke is Back and This Eight is Looked On as Almost Certain Winner – Crowd Arriving." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1926; Page 11.

This article discusses the Regatta that will be happening tomorrow, and the coaches' expectations for their crews and others.

Kelley, Robert F., "19 Eights To Race On Hudson Today/ Coast Sweep Seen, but Some Hold East Will Continue Last Year's Resurgence/ Seven In Varsity Test/ Field Closely Grouped Behind California – City in Gala Dress for Big Regatta." New York TIMES, June 17, 1939; Page 19, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta that is to occur today. California is widely considered the favorite, but Washington is also considered to be a good candidate, and so is Cornell. The only crew that does not seem to have a chance this year is Columbia, who has not performed up to expectations. Washington is considered to be the favorite for the freshmen race, although there are many good teams in that race. There are two pictures on this page, as well as a brief program.

Kelley, Robert F., "20 Crews Get Lanes For Poughkeepsie/ Record Total in Hudson Classic, With Navy Varsity Drawing Favored Position/ Columbia On The Outside/ Champions Draw the Least Desirable Course – Washington to Send Three Eights East." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 23, 1928; Page 31.

This article announces that the lanes for the Poughkeepsie Regatta have been drawn; navy got the favored inner lane, and Columbia drew the least favored outer lane. It also announces that for the first time both Navy and Washington will be entering three crews into the Regatta. There is a small listing at the bottom that lists the lanes that the crews drew for all three races.

Kelley, Robert F. "21 Crews, A Record, To Row On Hudson/ Lanes Drawn for 9 Varsity, 6 Junior Varsity, 6 Freshmen Eights for Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Columbia Varsity In No. 7/ Cornell to Have No. 5 Position, California No. 6, Washington No. 3 – Penn Gets No. 1." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 22, 1929; Page 25.

This article announces the lanes that each of the crews drew for the Poughkeepsie Regatta for all three races. There is a small chart listing the lanes as well.

Kelley, Robert F. "22 Crews Are Set For Hudson Classic/ Record Fleet of 9 to Compete Tomorrow in 4-Mile Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie/ Eights To Drill Today/ Coaches Forced to Break Custom of No Sunday Practices – More Than 100,000 Are Expected." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1929; Page S3.

This article discusses the Regatta that will happen tomorrow. It is expected that the biggest crowd that has ever attended the Regatta will be there to cheer the crews on. It also recaps the race that the substitute crews held the day before, Cornell won.

Kelley, Robert F. "75,000 See California Win Classic On Hudson; Washington Crew Next/ Margin is 3-4 length/ Bears Outrow Huskies in Final Mile to Repeat Triumph of 1932/ Navy in Thrilling Bid/ Cornell, Penn, Syracuse and Columbia Trail Middies – Victors' Time 19:44/ Syracuse J.V. Scores/ Comes Home Quarter-Length in Front-Washington Cubs Capture Honors." New York TIMES, June 17, 1934; Sec. III, Page 1, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California was the winner in what was claimed to be one of the closest and most thrilling races in a long time. The positions of the rest of the crews were listed, and then an account of the varsity race and the fight to the finish between Washington and California was recounted in detail. There is a picture and a chart on the page of this article. The article recounted that the day was beautiful with great conditions that gave an equal chance to all crews racing. The article also talks a little bit about what people were doing while they were waiting for the races to begin. Finally a synopsis of the entire day is given from the hours leading up to the freshmen race to the end of the varsity race.

Kelley, Robert F. "125,000 At The Regatta/ California, Cornell, M.I.T. and Syracuse Eights Swamped/ All Oarsmen Are Rescued/ Scenes of Confusion Mark the Finish as Craft, Lights Ablaze, Pick Up Athletes/ Secretary Adams Attends/ Syracuse Freshmen Triumph and Cornell Takes Race for Junior Varsities." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1929; Page 1.

This article announces that Columbia won the Poughkeepsie Regatta despite the very turbulent weather. Four of the crews in the varsity race were swamped from the rough water and had to be picked up from the middle of the river. 125,000 people were watching the race this year, and most people in Poughkeepsie had a half day at work to celebrate the occasion. There is a picture in this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "All Poughkeepsie Crews on Hand With Arrival of 4 More Squads/ Washington, California, Wisconsin and Cornell Reach Camp Too Late to Drill – Columbia, Navy Boatings Unsettled." New York TIMES, June 20, 1938; Page 19, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that four more crews arrived on the Hudson today. With the arrival of Washington, California, Wisconsin and Cornell, all the crews participating in this years Regatta are now settled and ready to work. It was too late for the new crews to begin practice, however all seven schools will be on the river tomorrow morning. Navy and Columbia are worried about the state of their crews. Both schools have had injuries in members of their Varsity boats, and neither school knows if their injured rowers will be ready to row at the Regatta. Despite the fact that the Regatta is not until the 27th, Poughkeepsie is already gearing up for the Regatta with decorations and store window displays, showing a heightened interest in the Regatta this year.

Kelley, Robert F., "Anderson Is Lost To Middies' Eight/ Lincoln Replaces Veteran No. 7, Whose Strained Muscles Fail to Improve/ Piercy Is Reported Well/ Will Row In Columbia Shell, According to Glendons at Poughkeepsie Camp." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1927; Page S5.

This article discusses some injuries that have occurred among a few crew members and the effects they are having among the crews, as well as practice schedules, and preparations for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

Kelley, Robert F. "Big Crowd Gathers For Hudson Regatta/ Twenty-two Crews From Nine Colleges to Row in 3 Races Today at Poughkeepsie/ Two Varsities Favored/ California and Columbia Held Even Choices – Secretary Adams Will Attend." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1929; Page 1.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the crowds that they are going to be expecting, the amount of crews that are participating, and how they are expecting the crews to perform.

Kelley, Robert F., "Boating Changed In Navy's Varsity/ Addition of Coffin, Austin and McMahon Increase Weight of Shell by 10 Pounds/ Syracuse in Time Trial/ First Crew Clocked Unofficially in 20:04 1-5 for Full Four-Mile Course on Hudson." New York TIMES, June 14, 1934; Page 31, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that because of the results of their time trials, Navy has replaced some of its varsity crew members, in order to make the boat a little bit heavier, and hopefully increase its time. The article also lists the results of several other schools time trials.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Arrives on Hudson – Washington Due Sunday/Six Veterans in Coast Boat." New York TIMES, June 11, 1936; Page 34, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California, the defending champions of the Regatta, have arrived on the Hudson. They began practice two hours after their arrival. Six out of the eight members are from last year's Varsity crew, and California is considered to be the team to beat. Washington, the current West Coast Champion, was supposed to arrive on Friday, but now reports say that they won't be arriving until Sunday.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Crew Displays Finesse/ Washington Is Held Back With Hume Not in Top Form – 18 Shells in Hudson Drills." New York TIMES, June 21, 1938; Page 25, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the workout activities of the colleges participating in the Regatta this year. The article especially focuses on California and Washington, the two western powerhouses that have dominated the Regatta for many years now. California appeared to be in beautiful condition and their hopes are really high. Washington has not been able to put in as hard workouts as they are accustomed to, due to rough water, but their coach intends on making up for that here on the Hudson. Their veteran stroke, Hume, lost two weeks of training because he had boils, and his weakness was evident in today's workout, but the coach is confident that he will be able to bring himself back into top condition for the race. There is serious concern on the Navy squad that Bullard, their number 2 spot on the Varsity squad is not recuperating as he should from the ptomaine poisoning he suffered. If he is not recovered in time Bill Croft will have to fill in his spot. There is a picture of Washington practicing on the Hudson.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Crew Displays Stamina In Six-Mile Drill at Poughkeepsie/ Washington, Still Favorite, Again Puts Off Time Trial – All Eights Undergo Double Workouts Despite Blazing Sun." New York TIMES, June 20, 1941; Page 26, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the day's practices for the crews on the river. Although they all worked double practices, they mostly took it easy, due to a very hot sun in the sky. All schools have participated in time trials except Washington, which is still putting it off. The Washington crew is still regarded as the favorite, with California also making a very good showing in Poughkeepsie so far. It was also announced that The Hudson River Day Line will be selling special tickets to pick people up and have them watch the race from their ship, which will leave for New York City directly after the last race of the day.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Crew Is First In Record Time On Hudson/ Washington Is 2D/ Also Cuts Poughkeepsie Mark Half Length Back – Navy Eight Third/ Syracuse Jayvees Win/ Triumph In Last Few Strokes – Huskies' Freshmen Beat Columbia in Close Finish." New York TIMES, June 18, 1939; Section 5, Page 1, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California won the Varsity race at this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta, with Washington close behind. Both California and Washington beat the record set last year by Navy. Syracuse won a very close Jayvee race, and Washington won the freshmen race by a mere foot over Columbia. The freshmen and Jayvee races were very exciting for the 20,000 spectators to watch. Washington barely held off the bid of Columbia for the freshmen race. Syracuse lost its lead to Washington in the Jayvee race, only to dig deep and pass them at the very end to win the race. The Varsity race was not as suspenseful since halfway through the race it was clear that the winner would be one of the Western crews. Garhart, the ill member of the Husky Cubs made it back in time to help his crew win the freshmen race. The rest of the article describes in detail how the Varsity race played out. There is a picture on this page.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Crews Arrive On Hudson/ Varsity, With Seven Men Who Rowed at Amsterdam, Shows Power in First Drill/ Men In Good Condition/ Other Eights in Long Paddles, Columbia Trying Racing Starts – Syracuse Expected Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1929; Page 35.

This article announces that California has arrived on the Hudson. It reports on how strong their coach feels they are and the first practice they held.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Golden Bears Take Up Quarters and Will Join Other Eights in Drills Today/ Many Rumors Are Rife/ Spuhn Denies Report of Penn Time Trial – Columbia Men Hold Long Spins – Wisconsin's Work Is Light." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1926; Page S3.

This article announces that California has arrived on the Hudson to begin practice with the others, as well as giving updates on how each of the crews are looking, and what they have been doing for practice.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Crews Brilliant in Drills/ Row 10 Miles in Rough Water on Hudson, Showing Power and Smoothness/Columbia in Time Trial/Absence of Murphy and Liggett With injured Hands Causes Concern in Lion Camp." New York TIMES, June 13, 1936; Page 20, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that California did an excellent job in their workout today. It was the first day that the river was rough, but that didn't seem to faze the Bears any. They pushed through the water smoothly and quickly, giving a remarkable display of strength. Columbia has two men out with blisters, and they are now concerned about the Regatta. Penn took it easy today, and only had a light workout.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Crews Speedy Off Mark/ Bears and Washington Have Many Supporters as Race on Hudson Draws Near." New York TIMES, June 23, 1938; Page 15, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts the day of practice that the crews had that day. It was another hot day, so most crews had very easy practices while the coaches tried to conserve their rowers' strength. Most crews just practiced racing starts, and California looked excellent. There is hope in the Navy camp as their injured rower, Bullard, was able to practice today, so there is hope he may be strong enough to row in the Regatta. Washington was a surprise today, putting in a time trial that night despite the hard workout they had the night before.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Eight Shows Great Power/ Varsity Gives Evidence of Strength, but Requires Polishing – Storm Interrupts Drills/ Columbia Is Impressive/ Men at Top Form in Fast Three-Mile Test – Navy Plebes Lose Chambers, the Regular No. 2." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1929; Page 28.

This article reports on how the crews on the Hudson are doing, injures to some crew members and the boating changes that occur because of them.

Kelley, Robert F. "California Eight Victor on Hudson as 50,000 Look On/ Golden Bears Hold Lead From the Start and Beat Cornell Varsity by 2 ½ Lengths/ Washington Takes Third/ Columbia Finishes Sixth Among Eight Crews in 4-Mile Race at Poughkeepsie/ Syracuse Triumphs Twice/ Orange Rows Home First in Both the Freshman and Junior Varsity Contests." New York TIMES, June 21, 1932; Page 1, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the results of this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. California won this year, taking them one step closer towards their goal of entering the Olympics and winning again. The article gives an account of how California won the race, as well as speculation that had been running that perhaps Syracuse would sweep the Regatta, since their freshmen and Junior Varsity crew's won their races. There also follows a detailed play by play account of how the Varsity race unfolded, and how all the crews performed in it. There are two pictures and three charts on this page.

Kelley, Robert F. "California Eights Arrive For Races/ Oarsmen From Syracuse and Wisconsin Also Are Welcomed at Poughkeepsie/ All Work Out On Hudson/ Marked Improvement Shown by Orange Crews – Double Drills for Columbia, Navy." New York TIMES, June 15, 1937; Page 28, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the crews for California, Wisconsin, and Syracuse arrived on the Hudson. California and Syracuse both brought Varsity and freshmen teams with them, while Wisconsin, on the river for the first time in half a dozen years, only brought a Varsity squad this year. All teams, including Columbia and Navy, had good workouts on the river today. Everyone appears to be in good form. Once Washington and Cornell arrive, the full contingency will be on the Hudson preparing for the showdown that will happen in one week.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Rows 4 Miles In 19:35/ Bears Cover Varsity Racing Route on Hudson – Cornell Is Clocked in 20:05/ 19 Crews Hold Practice/ Washington's Powerful Eight Does 19:50 – Poughkeepsie Gets Ready for Saturday." New York TIMES, June 14, 1939; Page 32, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the time trials that many crews had to prepare for the Regatta. There were many impressive showings, most notably California, Washington, and Cornell. Navy was unable to put in a time trial because boat wash kept them from finishing their race. Navy is still expected to do well in this race however. The town of Poughkeepsie is gearing up for the Regatta, and shopkeepers already have pennants hanging in their windows. It is believed that there will be more interest in the Regatta this year, and it was announced that the observation train cars are already sold out. It was also announced that the Junior Chamber of Commerce is taking interest in the Regatta, and is endeavoring to have a crew from England participate in the Regatta next year.

Kelley, Robert F., "California Squad Rows On Hudson/ Coast Favorites in Poughkeepsie Arrive 35 Strong at Noon and Unload Immediately/ Varsity Is Impressive/ Coach Ebright Says Boat Is Faster Than Last Year – Cornell and Syracuse to Arrive Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1927; Page 35.

This article announces that California arrived on the Hudson and immediately began practice. It also reports a short interview with Peter H. Troy, the Chairman of the Poughkeepsie Committee, who reveals that the demand for tickets are exceeding supply, which means there will be a great crowd here this year.

Kelley, Robert F. "California Takes College Crew Race And Breaks Record/ Leads Columbia and Cuts 17 Seconds Off Four-Mile Time at Poughkeepsie/ 70,000 View The Classic/ River Craft Set Sirens Screaming, While Crowds Cheer From the Observation Train/ Washington Eight Third/ But Navy Wins Junior Varsity and Freshmen Events – Twenty Crews Row on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1928; Page 1.

This article announces that California won the Poughkeepsie Regatta, ending Columbia's reign on the river. The article goes on to describe the race in detail, as well as the Junior Varsity and freshmen races. It describes the atmosphere of the race and the crowd, and the last minute preparations that the crews went through to get ready for the race. There is one chart and one picture in this article.

Kelley, Robert F. "California Varsity Crew Victor On Hudson for 3rd Successive Time/ Leads Cornell by Ten Feet at Poughkeepsie in Stirring Finish – Washington Third – Time of 18:52 Second Best Ever Recorded in Classic – Washington's Freshmen and Jayvees Score." New York TIMES, June 19, 1935; Page 1, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the winner of the varsity race was California, with Cornell and Washington following behind. The article also lists the order that the rest of the crews came in as well. According to the article this was one of the most exciting races and one of the closest finishes that the regatta has ever seen. The finish was so close that nobody but the referee's knew who had won right after the race. Navy was supposed to be the major contender for the East Coast, but it was Cornell who challenged California for the title. The article describes the entire varsity race, play by play. Washington led the race for the first two and a half miles. In the first mile of the race all seven crews were locked together, with no open water between anybody. After the first mile the crews began spreading out. When Cornell made its move it went from 5th place to 2nd place, and fought with California the entire way down, resulting in an incredibly close finish. Washington was somewhat disappointed by the result, their freshman and jayvee teams had both easily won their races, and Washington was hoping to sweep the Hudson, but it wasn't to be. The time of the winners, 18:52 was the second best time that has ever been rowed on the Hudson. The article also reports that due to the weather, the crowd was smaller this year than ever before. The article describes what the day was like in Poughkeepsie, starting off slowly because of the rain, and then gradually picking up pace until the city was packed with spectators. The article also describes what some of the crews did to pass the time before their races began.

Kelley, Robert F. "Change Advocated In Hudson Classic/ Mentors Move for Shortening of Course for Varsity Test From 4 to 3 Miles/ Ten Eyck Offers Reason/ Veteran Coach Says Action is Designed to Bring Penn Back to the Regatta." New York TIMES, December 16, 1937; Page 37, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that a proposition has been put to the members of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association to drop the length of the Poughkeepsie Regatta from 4 miles to 3 miles. The major reason for this proposed change is that Pennsylvania, one of the founders of the Association had to drop out of the Regatta because they claimed it was impossible to train their men for a four mile race at home. The coaches' feel that Pennsylvania, as one of the founders, should be able to race in the Regatta, and therefore the length of the course should be dropped to accommodate them. Possibly in the minds of the coaches as well is that western crews have been dominating the Regatta for some time now, and because of weather differences, the western crews are able to train longer for the Regatta than the eastern crews. Perhaps if the Regatta was dropped to a length of 3 miles it would even the odds for all crews. A few other minor adjustments were suggested at the meeting as well. As of yet, nothing has been decided upon.

Kelley, Robert F. "City of Poughkeepsie Proceeding With Plans for Regatta in 1934/ Preparations to Provide Permanent Training Quarters for Crews Will Continue – Eleven Rowing Events Scheduled This Year in Addition to Yale-Harvard Race." New York TIMES, June 14, 1933; Page 16, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces what the rest of the rowing schedule will be for the year, minus the Poughkeepsie Regatta. All teams are still expressing disappointment at its cancellation, but they are looking forward to resuming the Regatta the next year. The Poughkeepsie committee was also disappointed at the cancellation, and construction plans for a new Cornell boathouse will be suspended until next year.

Kelley, Robert F., "College Crews at Poughkeepsie Hold Two Workouts Under Perfect Conditions/Coach Lauds Spirit of Columbia Crew/Varsity Best Appearing Lion Eight at Poughkeepsie in Recent Seasons/Seven Boats Churn River/Morningside, Syracuse Fleets and Penn's Lone Shell in Double Workouts." New York TIMES, June 6, 1936; Page 12, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the day's workout for the three crews that are in Poughkeepsie training for the Regatta. All three colleges had their teams do double workouts today. Some coaches, such as Rusty Callow, are still working their substitutes, showing that the lineups are still not set in stone. All crews worked extremely hard today showing their intensity and drive.

Kelley, Robert F. "College Rowing Regatta on Hudson Expected to Attract Fleet of 18 Crews/ 18 Crews In Fleet Seen For Regatta/ Seven Expected to Start in Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie June 16/ Coast Boats To Compete/ Washington, California Entries Assured – Observation Car Ticket Prices Reduced." New York TIMES, May 23, 1934; Page 24, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article confirms the colleges that will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. It also lists the times of the races again, and how long each race lasts. The article also lists which colleges are expected to bring a Jayvee team and which colleges are expected to bring a freshman team with them. The article also confirms that the observation train will be running during all three races, and that the price had been reduced from the last race. Finally, all the crew teams will continue to race in the middle of the river, in order to avoid an unfair advantage to the crews that draw the outside lanes.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia and Harvard Will Attempt to Retain Laurels in Regattas This Week/ College Regattas On Card This Week/ Poughkeepsie Classic Tuesday Attracts Twenty Crews From Seven Colleges/ Columbia Varsity Favored/ Lions Expected to Fight Duel With California – Harvard and Yale Row Friday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1928; Page 141.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta and the New London Race that will be occurring this week. It briefly mentions the tradition of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, who the favorites are and why.

Kelley, Robert F. "Columbia And Penn Row 4-Mile Course/ Good Showing Is Made by Lions in Training for Regatta at Poughkeepsie June 24/ Evening Workout Held/ Red and Blue Forced to Stop at Cornell Boathouse to Empty Shell Due to Rough Water." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1929; Page 29.

This article describes the practices that Columbia and Pennsylvania had to prepare for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Coach Glendon of Columbia has canceled practice for his crews for the week unless the weather improves.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia Crews Row Own Courses/ Varsity Covers Full Sweep of Four Miles, While Juniors Go Three and Freshmen Two/ Yearlings Finish In Front/ Lead First Boat by Thirty-five Seconds – Three Syracuse Boats Due at Poughkeepsie Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1926; Page 19.

This article reveals what last minute practices the teams are going through as it gets closer to the Poughkeepsie Regatta, including Columbia whose three crews raced against each other, with the freshmen coming out on top.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia Eights Get A Hard Drill/ Four Men in Varsity Shell Have Blistered Hands, but Row With Bandages/ Penn Oarsmen Due Today/ Probably Will Reach Camp on the Hudson In Time for an Afternoon Row." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1927; Page 31.

This article describes another very hard practice that the Columbia crews underwent today, combined with yesterday's practice is effecting the crew. Pennsylvania is expected to arrive today.

Kelley, Robert F. "Columbia Eights Hold Long Paddle/ Glendon Orders Morning Drill, While Penn Has Time Trial at Poughkeepsie/ Callow's Men Start Late/ Columbia's Varsity in Good Form, so Coach Turns Attention to Freshmen Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1929; Page S3.

This article describes the practices of Columbia and Pennsylvania, their last practices as the only crews on the Hudson. Pennsylvania had a time trial today, although it was more like a hard workout than a real time trial, but the crews still did well.

Kelley, Robert F. "Columbia Eights Hold Time Trials/ Varsity, Jayvees Row Against Watch Over 4 and 3 Mile Routes at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1929; Page 40.

This article announces that all the crews on the Hudson had time trials in practice today. California, the only crew not on the Hudson yet, will be arriving tomorrow afternoon.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia Is First To Row On Hudson/ Glendon Puts Four Crews on the Water After Arrival at Poughkeepsie/ Steals A March On Rivals/ Likely to Experiment With Boatings Before Foes Appear On Scene – Fast Race Is Predicted." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1927; Page 11.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived on the Hudson to begin practice, a whole six days before any other crews are scheduled to arrive. It is expected that the coaches will do a fair amount of seat shifting in the boats before the other crews arrive. It is also expected that this year it will be a fast race on the river, and already there have been a record number of ticket sales requested.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia Oarsmen Put In 18-Mile Day/ Four Eights Row 6 in Morning and 12 in Twilight on the Hudson to Gain Distance/ Jayvee Shifts Abandoned/ Glendon Restores Old Boating, but 2 Reserves Enter Freshmen Shell – Navy Expected Friday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1927; Page 37.

This article describes the strenuous workout that the Columbia oarsmen underwent, as well as mentioning that the coach has decided to not change the order of the Junior Varsity.

Kelley, Robert F. "Columbia Oarsmen Rest, Visit Movie/ Entire Squad, for First Time in Years, Takes Recess and Quits Seclusion." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1929; Page 17.

This article discusses how the crews all took a day off today and rested. Columbia's crews even went to the movies. California's crew members are keeping to themselves, even going as far as going out on the river when nobody else is on there.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia Oarsmen Show More Power/ Two Weeks' Intensive Training Begins to Tell – Danneman's Illness Only Worry/ Crews Busy On Ideal Day/ All Practice on Hudson Except Penn Freshmen – Frink and Lange Out of Penn Varsity." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1927; Page 12.

This article describes a little of what the crews on the Hudson have been doing for practice and how they are looking. As well as news and updates, such as the oarsman that has fallen ill in the Columbia crew.

Kelley, Robert, F., "Columbia Oarsmen Start Hard Grind/ Have River at Poughkeepsie to Themselves, but Penn and Wisconsin Due Today/ Glendon Planning Shift/ Coach Is Expected to Put Heavier Men in Varsity Shell to Provide Power for Four-Mile Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1926; Page S3.

This article talks about the Columbia oarsmen that have arrived on the Hudson to begin practice, and they are the only ones that are there so far. It also discusses how the coach is planning to put heavier men into the boat to try and see how that works.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia, Penn and Syracuse Crews Rest; California Due at Poughkeepsie Wednesday." New York TIMES, June 8, 1936; Page 27, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the day's activities for the crews on the Hudson. It is Sunday so Penn did not row at all, and the other crews had very light workouts. Starting Monday, however, all three colleges will be back to two workouts a day. On Wednesday the defending champions, California, will be joining the crews on the river to prepare for the Regatta. California is widely considered to be the team to beat this year. They are already planning on entering the Olympic 2,000 meter trials after the Regatta is over.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia Squad Takes Brief Spin/ Only Crew to Hold Workout at Poughkeepsie Delays Start Until Late Evening/ California Begins Today/ Delay of Baggage Prevents Planned Spin – Penn Camp Worried Over Measles Scare." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1926; Page 14.

This article reveals that Columbia was the only crew who practiced on this Sunday, and it gives the conditions of the other crews, as well as reports on a German measles scare in the Pennsylvania camp.

Kelley, Robert F., "Columbia Varsities Shaken By Glendon/ Capt. Wiberg and Davis Return to First Boat, Which Coach Deems Best Combination/ Even Coxswains Switched/ Riley Moves Up, Replacing Muller – California Takes First Spin at Poughkeepsie With Rivals." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1926; Page 20.

This article reports what changes Coach Glendon of Columbia has finally made to his Varsity and Junior Varsity crews. He had been experimenting with different combinations in those two boats, and finally has his final pick.

Kelley, Robert F., "Cornell and California Row Four-Mile Trials for Poughkeepsie Race/ Ithacans Clocked In 19:33 On Hudson/ Cornell Varsity Rows With Poise and Power to Beat California Crew's Time/ Both Buck A Headwind/ Navy and Syracuse Hold Two Workouts – Hooper Tried as Princeton Stroke." New York TIMES, June 14, 1940; Page 29, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the time trials that Cornell and California took today on the Hudson. Both schools looked good, and turned in good times. Cornell turned in a faster time than California, and they looked to be in excellent shape. Tomorrow, Washington and Princeton will be having time trials, and then after that everything will calm down until it is time for the Regatta. There is a picture on this page.

Kelley, Robert F., "Cornell and Syracuse Rule Slight Favorites for Poughkeepsie Regatta Today/22 Crews will Race On the Hudson Today/Oarsmen From Nine Colleges Will Compete in the Annual Regatta at Poughkeepsie/Varsities Well Matched/Cornell and Syracuse Slight Favorites, With Columbia Rated Close Behind/Cornell Substitutes Win/Lead Washington After a Keen Struggle-Syracuse and Navy Finish Next," New York TIMES, June 16, 1931; Page 32, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the Regatta that is to be held tomorrow. It mentions how Cornell won the Substitute race, and how close it was. The weather is also discussed, which has been cloudy and overcast, and the preparation coach's are making in case of bad weather for the race. There is a feeling of excitement in the town of Poughkeepsie for the race tomorrow, and the observation train is all sold out. The article discusses how it is expected that each team shall perform, and mentions how four of the crew teams have undefeated varsities going into this Regatta, and how that is expected to play out in the race tomorrow. All the crew teams and members are listed in the article, for all three races. Finally it is mentioned that this Regatta will be broadcast by two nation-wide systems while it is going on, NBC, and the Columbia Broadcasting System.

Kelley, Robert F., "Cornell Oarsmen Complete Fleet/All 18 Boats at Poughkeepsie Training for Three-Race Regatta Monday/Red Varsity East's Hope/But Fine Trials by Washington and California Indicate West Will Be Hard to Beat." New York TIMES, June 16, 1936; Page 35, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Cornell arrived on the Hudson River, which meant that all 18 crews that had registered for the race were now present and accounted for. Cornell looked very good practicing today, and it is widely believed that they are the hope of the East. Navy, however, also had a good workout, and they are also considered to be contenders. Washington, however, had a very good showing today and California had an excellent time trial on Saturday, confirming that the two western crews will be the ones to beat this year.

Kelley, Robert F., "Cornell, Syracuse Row On The Hudson/ Wray's Four Crews Cover Four Miles, Ten Eyck's Trio Three After Their Arrival/ 18 Shells On The Water/ Penn Varsity Takes Time Trial, With Freshmen Showing Well – Sweetser Due to Stay as First Stroke." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1927; Page 21.

This article briefly describes the workouts that the crews on the Hudson have been undergoing and how they are looking.

"Kelley, Robert F., "Cornell, Washington, California Favorites for Poughkeepsie Race Tomorrow/18 College Crews Close Hard Work/Cornell Eight, Hope of East in Hudson Classic, Attains Peak of Condition/Washington Four Wins/Leads Navy by 1 and 1/2 Lengths in One-Mile Race – Syracuse Jayvees Will Row." New York TIMES, June 21, 1936; Section 5, Page 3, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the close of all the practices the day before the race. All crews practiced twice today and all seemed in good form. Syracuse has re-entered their Jayvee's so the count is once again up to 18 crews on the Hudson. Cornell, Washington, and California are seen as the favorites for the varsity race, and many people feel that Cornell is in excellent condition, and possibly the best condition it has ever been in. All crews were practicing late today because the races are scheduled to start late tomorrow. There was an informal race among fours, and Washington's crew beat out Navy. This article has a picture of the California Varsity crew practicing on the Hudson.

Kelley, Robert F., "Crews End Season On Hudson Today/ 19 Eights, Representing Eight Colleges, to Compete in 30th Annual Regatta/ Open Race Is Expected/ California, Cornell and Columbia Threaten Varsity Reign of Navy and Washington/ Crowd of 100,000 Likely/ Cornell Substitutes Beat Syracuse and Columbia Combinations Boats in Race Rowed in Rain." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1927; Page 19.

This article discusses the Regatta that will be held the next day. It talks about the crews and how they are expected to perform, especially the western crews which are feared by the rest. It also gives the results of the reserve races that are held the day before. There are two charts in this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Crews Get A Rest At Poughkeepsie/ Columbia and Penn Leave Shells on Rack and Spend an Easy Day." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1927; Page 27.

This article describes Columbia and Pennsylvania's day off from practice.

Kelley, Robert F., "Crews On Hudson Have Final Drills/ Work Is Limited to Short Paddles and the Execution of Racing Starts/ All Are To Rest Today/ Columbia Alarmed When Freshmen Stroke Has Boil on Knee, but Is Expected to Row Tomorrow." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1926; Page S3.

This article tells what the crews will be doing for their final practices before the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as how each crew has been looking and how they are expected to perform.

Kelley, Robert F., "Crews Taper Off in Training for Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Fowler, No. 4, Back With Coast Eight/ Washington Will Learn Today if Ailing Oarsman Will Be Able to Race Tomorrow/ Break In Weather Helps/ Crews Tested in Rough Water – Cornell Is Regarded as East's Standard Bearer." New York TIMES, June 24, 1941; Page 24, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses what most crews did for practice with just two days before the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Washington is still considered to be the favorite to win the race. They may have a setback, however, because one of their men has a bad cold, and he may not be able to row in the race. California is also thought to have a good chance at winning the Regatta. All the crews went out today and conducted various forms of lighter practices today.

Kelley, Robert F., "Eighteen Crews to Compete Saturday in Poughkeepsie Regatta on the Hudson/ Crews On Hudson Open Final Drive/ Eighteen Boats to Compete in Three Races of Poughkeepsie Regatta Saturday/ Cornell, Navy due today/ California Looms as Powerful Eight in Varsity Event – Large Crowd Likely." New York TIMES, June 10, 1934; Sec. III, Page 3, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article goes into detail about when each race will be starting, who will be racing in each race and where their positions will be. The article also talks about the chances each team has to win the all important varsity race. It was originally thought that Washington and California would be the only contenders in the varsity race, however many teams have had impressive practice runs on the river so far, and Syracuse in particular is looking to be a very strong contender in the race. The article also goes over what the activities of some of the crews have been since arriving in Poughkeepsie to get ready for the big day. There are two pictures on this page of crews practicing for the Regatta on the Hudson.

Kelley, Robert F., "Eights Set to Race On Hudson Today/ Navy Is Main Hope of East in Varsity Test – West Picked in Two Other Events/ Roosevelt Will Attend/ Plans to Arrive in Time for the Jayvee Contest – Fast Conditions Are Likely." New York TIMES, June 27, 1938; Page 21, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the scene on the Hudson the day before the Regatta. Some crews broke the rest on Sunday rule and had light workouts. The weather was rainy and cool, and if the wind stays in the direction it is currently in, the conditions on the river will be very fast. It is expected that records will be broken tomorrow. The west is still largely considered the favorites for the Varsity race, but the Junior Varsity and the freshmen races are thought to be anyone's race. Navy is still thought to be the hope of the east, and they may be bolstered by the injury of their coach. He had to be checked into the hospital, and the Navy crew will have to go to the starting line tomorrow without him. A record breaking crowd is expected, with President Roosevelt leading the pack. He is expected to arrive in time for the Junior Varsity race. There are two charts and one picture with this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "First Navy Drill Staged on Hudson/ Three Eights and Four Take to Water Late in Day for Light Paddle." New York TIMES, June 11, 1937; Page 11, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy arrived on the Hudson and that evening began their first practice to prepare themselves for the Regatta. Columbia was with them on the river, but unfortunately for that school they have had problems this year. They had to withdraw their Junior Varsity boat, and it looks like the substitute Junior Varsity team they made up will not be able to row either. Their Varsity squad has had some injuries as well. The Varsity and freshmen teams look good, but neither of them looks good enough to be considered threats in their fields.

Kelley, Robert F., "Flotilla Complete For Rowing Event/ Washington, Cornell Crews Join Rivals in Practice for Poughkeepsie Race/ Harvard sees Yale Drill/ River Bank Spying is Halted by Advance Notice of Rival Eight's Trials." New York TIMES, June 16, 1937; Page 29, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the last two schools, Cornell and Washington, arrived on the Hudson, and now all schools and teams were assembled for the Regatta that will happen in a week. The day was very hot so not much practice was accomplished during the day, but at night all crews were out on the water putting in practice runs, with Navy doing more work than anyone. Cornell has the heaviest crew on the Hudson this year, and Washington looked to be in as wonderful form as they were when they swept the Regatta and won the Olympics the year before.

Kelley, Robert F., "Four Crews Break Record On Hudson/ California, Columbia, Navy, and Cornell in Time Trials Beat 18:53 1-5/ Favored By Flood Tide/ Twelve Washington Oarsmen, Four From the Varsity, Are Taken Ill in Camp." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1928; Page 22.

This article reports on the time trials that all of the crews participated in today. Many coaches submitted their times as official to be logged into the books. The river was very fast today, and at least four crews broke the record for the fastest time up the Hudson.

Kelley, Robert F., "Glendon Bemoans Lack of Material/ Columbia Coach is Pessimistic Over Crew's Chances in the Poughkeepsie Regatta/ No Varsity Shifts Planned/ Small Squad Prevents Further Changes, Says Mentor – Light Paddle Is Only Workout." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1927; Page 19.

This article discusses the Columbia crews that will be rowing this years, their coach's expectations, as well as what they have been doing to prepare.

Kelley, Robert F., "Glendon Experimenting With Columbia Eights in Workouts on Hudson/ Lion Varsity Crew Near Top Condition/ Long Drills Are Still Needed and the Columbians Cannot Afford to Lose Weight/ Cordes, Bower In Shell/ Syracuse, Wisconsin, Princeton and California to Reach Poughkeepsie Tomorrow." New York TIMES, June 6, 1940; Page 37, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses Columbia, who has been on the Hudson practicing by themselves for the past few days. They have appeared in very good shape, and have the best record out of the east coast teams so far. Four more schools are expected tomorrow, and then two more over the weekend, so today was the last day of solitary practice for Columbia. Although they appear in great shape and seem to be approaching the peak of their physical ability, the only concern is they are very close to the minimum weight limit, and if the weather continues to be warm as it was today they may have to cut back on their practices so their team does not lose any weight.

Kelley, Robert F., "Hudson Date Hits Princeton Plans/ Exams May Delay Tiger Crews' Entry Until 1940 – Tides Dictate June 17 Races/ Greater Interest Seen/ Sport Given Impetus by Navy Victory – Fleet of Eighteen Likely for Three Tests." New York TIMES, January 27, 1939; Page 24, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Board of Stewards met and chose the date of June 17th for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, with the Freshmen, Jayvee, and Varsity races to begin at 4:00, 5:00, and 6:00 respectively. This is an early date for the Regatta, although one that could not be helped because of the tides, but it may interfere with Princeton joining the Regatta this year. All the usual candidates were invited, and it is expected that most will accept. It is unsure if Pennsylvania will re-enter the Regatta this year. Some believe that since Navy beat the hold the West had over the Regatta, it will encourage Pennsylvania to join once again.

Kelley, Robert F., "Injury to French Hinders Columbia/ Veteran No. 3, With an Infected Finger, Replaced in First Eight by Donaldson/ Oarsmen Cover 15 Miles/ Penn, With New Boatings, Goes Same Distance on Hudson Despite Rain – California Arrives Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1927; Page 24.

This article reports on an injury to a member of the Columbia crew, as well as Pennsylvania's practice and the improving conditions of the Hudson's tides.

Kelley, Robert F., "Intercollegiate Rowing Association Votes to Resume Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Rowing To Return To Poughkeepsie/ Intercollegiate Group Votes to Resume Crew Classic After One-Year Lapse/ June 16 Tentative Date/ Rutgers and Marietta of Ohio, New Figures in Sport, to Get Invitations." New York TIMES, January 25, 1934; Page 24, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the board of stewards voted to hold the Poughkeepsie Regatta again this year. The date of June 16th was suggested, and that will become the official date if the Poughkeepsie committee and the railroad company responsible for the observation trains agree with it. The Regatta will be held the same as usual, with a Varsity race of 4 miles, a junior varsity race of 3 miles and a freshmen race of 2 miles. After the meeting, invitations were sent out to all colleges that competed last year, as well as a few new ones. This year, Rutgers and Marietta of Ohio will receive invitations and hopefully join what is known as the climax of the rowing season.

Kelley, Robert F., "Katz, No. 7, Returns To Cornell Varsity/ Coach Wray Sends Boat Down stream in an Attempt to Prepare for Time Trial/ California In Long Paddle/ Highly Rated Poughkeepsie Contender Shapes Well in Pull – Middies in Mile Sprint." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1928; Page 23.

This article describes the various practice routines of the crews on the Hudson. California is looking in very good shape, and the opinion of the spectators is that Navy is not looking as good as they have in previous years.

Kelley, Robert F. "Lanes are Drawn for Three Races/ Varsity Event Attracts Eight Entries and Freshmen Seven – Six in Jayvee Test/ No. 1 Course to Syracuse/ Gets Inside Position for Two Contests – Same Place Goes to California for Yearling Race." New York TIMES, May 26, 1932; Page 33, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces how many crews will be racing in the Regatta, the lane assignments that the crews drew, as well as what times the races will be held at. It also announces that because of money issues Washington will only be sending a Varsity Crew to the Regatta this year.

Kelley, Robert F., "Lanes Drawn for Eighteen Crews in Poughkeepsie Regatta on June 18/ Eight To Compete In 4-Mile Classic/ Columbia, Syracuse, Cornell Varsities Appear Hopes of East in Hudson Race/ Princeton In Two Tests/ Will Row in Feature and in Freshmen Event – 6 Jayvee, 4 Cub Crews Entered." New York TIMES, May 23, 1940; Page 33, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that all the lanes have been drawn for the three races at Poughkeepsie, and it lists which schools will be racing in which lanes. The article also comments that the East is very hopeful this year that they will be able to take the Hudson back from the West. Columbia, Cornell, and Syracuse in particular look like they are poised to challenge the West for the honor of winning the varsity event.

Kelley, Robert F., "M.I.T. Joins Fleet At Poughkeepsie/ All Crews Entered Now Are on Scene of Regatta – Final Drive Gets Under Way/ Washington Does 19:48/ Varsity Rows Four Miles in Trial for Race Wednesday – Princeton Impressive." New York TIMES, June 21, 1941; Page 13, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that M.I.T. arrived on the Hudson, minus two varsity members who will be joining them tomorrow. This is M.I.T.'s first visit to the Hudson since 1932. Washington performed a time trial today; their time was not overly spectacular; however, the heat was intense, and that probably had an effect on them.

Kelley, Robert F., "Navy Crew Victor in Race On Hudson/Spurts to Gain Lead in Final Mile, Scoring Amazing Upset in 18:54 1-5/Cornell Length Behind/1930 Champions Just Nip Washington, Which Sets Pace Most of Way, in Stirring Regatta," New York TIMES, June 17, 1931; Page 1, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the triumph of the Navy crew team at the Poughkeepsie Regatta, with Cornell coming in second and Washington in third. The article describes in detail how close the finish was, and why the favored Cornell was not able to win the race. The positions that all the crews came in are listed, as well as how each team did rowing the race. It was also discussed how the Regatta was delayed an hour because of the weather, and how the crowds and teams were dealing with it. How the day unfolded as a whole is described, and then the varsity race is described in detail play by play. Two pictures are available in this article as well as three charts.

Kelley, Robert F., "Navy Crews Reach Camp On Hudson/ Varsity, Jayvees and Plebes Move Into New Quarters and Will Go on River Today/ Boatloads Changed Often/ More Shifts Appear to Be in Order – All Oarsmen Idle, but Columbia Coxswains Have Workout." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1929; Page 36.

This article reports on the progress of the crews preparing for the Regatta, the many changes that have been happening in the seating of the crews, as well as the fact that Navy has arrived to Poughkeepsie.

Kelley, Robert F., "Navy Draws Lane 1 In Hudson Regatta/ Washington, Favored Along With Middy Varsity, 2 Berths Away for June 22 Race/ Conditions Are Equalized/ Advantages of Position Offset by Shift – Arrangements Made for Observation Train." New York TIMES, June 3, 1937; Page 33, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that all the crews drew their lane assignments for all three races for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Navy drew the number one lane. They are considered to be the only real threat to Washington, who dominated the Regatta last year. Washington's varsity drew the number 3 lane, so if a showdown between the two teams does go down it will be easy to follow. All crews were pleased with the lanes they drew, although there is no one lane that's better than another ever since the race was moved to the middle of the river to avoid unfair advantages based on what lane crews drew. The article also lists which lanes the crews would be racing in for all three races.

Kelley, Robert F., "Navy Eights Cover Complete Courses/ Flaws Revealed as Middies Strive for Low-Stroking Power in Early Drill/ Columbia Rows 4 Miles/ Varsity Has Good Workout at Poughkeepsie – Cubs Show Improvement in Camp." New York TIMES, June 13, 1937; Sec. 5, Page 2, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the practice runs that Navy and Columbia did today. Both crews had good workouts, although neither squad was overly impressive. It appears that Navy is going to attempt to maintain their low-stroking strategy that has kept them undefeated this year.

Kelley, Robert F., "Navy Oarsmen Arrive at Poughkeepsie Quarters/ O'Sullivan Stroke Of Navy's Varsity/ Promoted From the Jayvees, He Replaces Cuccias, Who Goes to No. 2 in 2d Crew/ Other Eights Work Hard/ Time Trial Held by Columbia on the Hudson – California Excels at High Speed." New York TIMES, June 13, 1940; Page 34, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy arrived on the Hudson completing the flotilla for the big race. They arrived too late to put in a practice, but they will be on the river first thing tomorrow and all eyes will be on them. The Western crews still appear to be doing well. It was noted that they are both rowing different styles than they have in the previous years. It will be interesting to see if this has any effect. This article has a picture with it.

Kelley, Robert F. "Navy Varsity Crew Impresses In Drill/ Rows 4 Miles at Fast Pace, With Time Estimated at 20 Minutes – Keeps Stroke High/ Penn Boating Is Changed/ Callow Experiments With No. 7 in Varsity – California in Long Paddle – Syracuse Arrives." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1929; Page 24.

This article briefly discusses the practices that the crews on the Hudson held today, focusing especially on Navy, who held impressive unofficial time trials.

Kelley, Robert F., "Navy Varsity Sets New Mark To Win In Hudson Regatta/ Coach, From Hospital, Sees Middies Nip California – Washington Crew Third/ Columbia Finishes Next/ Triumph First for the East Since 1931 – Bears, Huskies Annex Other Races." New York TIMES, June 28, 1938; Page 1, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the east finally took control of the Hudson when Navy won the Varsity race in a superb battle with the two powerhouses from the west. This is the first time the east has won the Varsity race since 1931, and it was Navy who took the title then as well. The crowd was jubilant, and the Navy destroyers let out ear piercing whistles. California came in second; almost winning the race, but Navy came back in the last 200 miles to take the title. Not far behind was Washington in third. All the crews rowed excellently, however, and were all bunched together for most of the race. The conditions made for very fast racing and the first four crews to cross the finish line all came in under the record set last year by Washington. California's freshmen finally beat the undefeated Husky Cubs in a photo finish, but Washington won the Junior Varsity race, to the surprise of many, including them. Because of the weather, however, this Regatta had the smallest crowd of spectators Poughkeepsie has seen in years. The observation train and yachts were full, but the shorelines, which are usually packed, were surprisingly empty. The rest of the article describes the Varsity race in detail from start to finish.

Kelley, Robert F., "Nine Crews Paddle In Regatta Drills/ Columbia, Navy and Penn Boats Work Out in Rain Over Poughkeepsie Course/ Sprints Held At Finish/ Jack Eddy, Brother of Tom, Sets Spanking Stroke for Middies' Varsity Against Juniors." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1928; Page 27.

This article briefly mentions that all the crews at Poughkeepsie were on the Hudson practicing today. It also discusses the Navy lineup, and a few changes that have occurred in their shell.

Kelley, Robert F., "Oarsmen End Drive for Intercollegiate Regatta at Poughkeepsie Wednesday/ Washington Heads The Varsity Field/ California Chief Threat to Favored Huskies Over 4-Mile Grind on Hudson/ Princeton Rated Highly/ Cornell Is Unknown Quantity – Total of 19 Crews Will Row in Three Events." New York TIMES, June 22, 1941; Section 5, Page 3, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the atmosphere and attitudes of the crews and spectators, now that it is so close to the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Some crews put in their last hard workout today. From this point on the practices will be easier so crews can save their energy for the big day. Many crews look like they are in great shape, but the general consensus is that Washington will be in first place, and the battle will be who will challenge California for second place.

Kelley, Robert F., "Oarsmen End First Week of Training at Poughkeepsie With Practice Spins/Penn Crew Covers Four-Mile Course/Red and Blue Varsity Steady in Paddle on the Hudson-Callow is Hopeful/Columbia in Two Drills/Change Expected in Syracuse Boatings – Ideal Weather is Welcomed by Coaches." New York TIMES, June 7, 1936; Section V., Page 2, Col 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article continues to discuss the workouts of the crews that have arrived in Poughkeepsie for the Regatta. Penn had the hardest workout today, coming close to a time trial speed. The weather has been very favorable this past week, and the coaches are hopeful that the weather will continue this way.

Kelley, Robert F., "Oarsmen of Washington and Navy Join Squads in Training at Poughkeepsie/Cornell Due Today At Camp On Hudson/Will Complete Field on Hand for Title Intercollegiate Regatta on June 22/Washington, Navy Arrive/Ulbrickson Thinks Highly of His Men – Intensive Work Planned by Coaches." New York TIMES, June 15, 1936; Page 29, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that both Washington and Navy crews arrived today on the Hudson River. Washington arrived in the early hours of the morning, and they are housed in the boathouse next to California, their west coast rivals. Navy arrived at night and were eager to begin training. It is expected that both Washington and Navy will put in two hard workouts tomorrow. The only crew that is left to arrive is Cornell, and they will arrive early tomorrow morning. All crews are anxious to see what Cornell will be like this year. There is a picture of the Columbia Varsity practicing at Poughkeepsie with this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Only 2 Squads Out For Hudson Drills/ Cornell and California Men Launch Shells Despite Turbulent Waters." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1927; Page 17.

This article discusses the concerns of the coaches over the weather and water conditions on race day. For the past three days there have not been good conditions; today only Cornell and California made it out on the river to practice. The other squads took trips to other locations to try to relieve the tension.

Kelley, Robert F., "Penn And Columbia Row 10 Miles Each/ Red and Blue Eight Gets Down to Serious Work on Hudson After a Shake-Up/ Sweetser Back As Stroke/ Coach Spuhn Also Places Borie and Farber in Varsity – Douglas Now Columbia Jayvee Stroke." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1927; Page 29.

This article details the practice that Pennsylvania took today, and mentions what Columbia for practice.

Kelley, Robert F., "Penn Crews Reach Camp On Hudson/ Take Up Regatta Quarters at Highland and Have First Workout in Ten Days/ Columbia Oarsmen Drill/ Varsity and Freshmen Boats Are Sent Upstream in Morning and Afternoon Paddles." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1927; Page 33.

This article announces that Pennsylvania is the second crew team to arrive on the Hudson to begin practice for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

Kelley, Robert F., "Penn Crews Work Two Long Sessions/ Coach Spuhn Continues to Make Changes in Effort to Develop Best Eight/ Columbia Men Taper Off/ Glendon Shifts Freshmen Boat, Trying to Strengthen Forward End of First-Year Craft." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1927; Page S4.

This article describes the practices of Columbia and Pennsylvania.

Kelley, Robert F., "Penn Eight Holds Best Time Trial/ Varsity, Favored By Flood Tide, Covers Four Miles in Nineteen Minutes/ Washington's Time 19:55/ Effort of Callow's Men Fastest Yet Reported – Cornell's Three Crews Arrive." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1928; Page 36.

This article announces that Cornell has finally arrived on the Hudson, the last school to come to Poughkeepsie. It also reports on the time trials of Pennsylvania and Washington, as well as briefly mentioning the time trials of the other schools as well.

Kelley, Robert F., "Penn Crew Stages Fast 4-Mile Trial/ Quakers Clocked in 19:50 – Navy and California Also Row Over Full Course." New York TIMES, June 13, 1934; Page 30, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reports how some of the crews had been doing in their time trials in preparation for the Regatta. It also gives some speculation on how the rest of the teams were doing, since not all teams reported their times. In addition, the article announces that all three races would be starting fifteen minutes later than previously announced. The reason for the shift is to give the observation boats more time to get settled securely to brace themselves against the changing tides.

Kelley, Robert F., "Penn Shows Form In Test on Hudson/ Unofficially Timed in 19:41 for Trial Rowed Upstream at Poughkeepsie/California Crew Drills/Veteran Champions Impressive – Heat Slows Practice of Columbia, Syracuse." New York TIMES, June 12, 1936; Page 31, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the day of practice that the crews participated in. California joined the other crews for their first hard day of workout. The Bears looked like they were in excellent condition. Many people are speculating that the Bears will be able to set a record by winning three Olympic gold medals in a row. They are certainly the biggest team on the river, and they are considered the team to beat. Penn had a time trial today, and did very well. They are considered to be one of the better teams the east coast has to offer this year.

Kelley, Robert F. "Plan Rules To Stop Late Regatta Start/ Would Disqualify Latecomers at Poughkeepsie Crew Races in the Future/ May Curb Coxswains Also/ Limitation Likely to Be Placed on Number of Times They May Ask Delay at the Start." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1929; Page 26.

This article discusses how the rules will most likely be changed for next year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. Crews will not be allowed to arrive to the start late, due to the delayed starts at this year's race. It is believed that the rules will state that any crew that is late or needlessly holds up the start of the race will be disqualified.

Kelley, Robert F. "Plans for Intercollegiate Rowing Regatta on Hudson Announced by Stewards/ Poughkeepsie Race Is Set For June 18/ College Rowing Stewards Fix Hudson Regatta for Week Day After 1934 Change/ Five Entries Pledged/ Non-Members of Group Likely to Accept Bids Again – Three Contests on Schedule." New York TIMES, March 8, 1935; Page 28, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on June 18th this year. This guarantees that the Regatta will be held during a weekday, as it has been every year except for last year. One factor that is taken into consideration when the date is picked is the observation train. The same train cars are used in the Yale-Harvard Regatta, and there must be enough time in between races to allow the cars to make it down to Poughkeepsie in time. The article also announces that the association is anticipating all three races being held this year, and every member of the association has guaranteed that they will at least enter a varsity crew. Invitations will be sent out to all the normal participants in the Regatta, including Rutgers and Marietta, which were new entries to the Regatta last year.

Kelley, Robert F. "Poughkeepsie Lanes Drawn/ 18 Crews in Draw For Hudson Lanes/ Seven Varsity, Five Jayvee and Six Freshman Boats in Poughkeepsie Regatta/ California Eight Inshore/ Cornell, Another Favorite, Is Alongside – Columbia in All Three Events." New York TIMES, May 27, 1936; Page 33, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces where all the crews will be racing in all three races. There is also some speculation on which crews will be the favorite for this year's races. California, Washington, and Cornell are all considered favorites; however Navy and Penn also have strong teams this year. The favored inner lanes, for the varsity race, this year went to California and to Cornell, with Washington on the far outside. There is one chart in this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Record Flotilla In Regatta Today/ Twenty Crews Are on Edge for the 34th Annual Classic at Poughkeepsie/ Town Is Gayly Bedecked/ Columbia and California Are Favorites in Varsity Event of Seven Shells/ 100,000 May See Races/ Vanguard of the Throng on Hand Despite Threat of Rain Along the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1928; Page 21.

This article discusses the Regatta this is to take place tomorrow. It talks about the amount of crews entered, the amount of spectators, the decorations, who the favorites are and why, and the general air of anticipation and excitement.

Kelley, Robert F., "Regatta Changes on Hudson Denied/ Stewards Feel Varsity Race Would Lose Prestige if the Course Were Shortened/ Tentative Date is Listed/ June 27 Selected, Subject to Tidal Conditions – Penn's Return in 1939 Seen." New York TIMES, January 27, 1938; Page 24, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the results of the annual Board of Stewards meeting for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Generally this meeting set the date and times of the Regatta for the coming summer, as well as issue invitations to colleges that are not a member of the IRA. This year the tentative date was set for June 27th, and the freshmen race is set to kick things off at 2:45. Invitations were sent out to the usual group of schools. It is expected that the West Coast schools will accept while the East Coast schools will not. In addition to these orders of business, however, the stewards also considered the request that the Varsity race be shortened from four miles to three miles. After careful consideration the stewards unanimously voted to reject this proposal. There were several reasons for the rejection, but the biggest reason was that they felt that the Poughkeepsie Regatta would lose some of its prestige if the race was shortened from the classic and traditional four miles.

Kelley, Robert F., "Regatta Oarsmen Ready For Trials/ Columbia, Navy and Penn Shells Expected to Cover Courses Against Time This Week/ Lion Freshmen Get Test/ Glendon Tries Yearlings Under Watch With Kuisalato at No. 5 in Place of Keil." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1928; Page 21.

This article gives an overview of the practice routines of the crews on the Hudson, and speculates on when they will be taking their time trials. It also briefly discusses the living situation of the crews who are participating this year.

Kelley, Robert F., Regatta Oarsmen Set For Tomorrow/ Only Short Paddles by Columbia and California Ruffle Water at Poughkeepsie/ Rhydlander Still Ailing/ California, However, Has Capable Relief in Dally – Navy Plebes Favored Over Two-Mile Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1928; Page 17.

This article describes all the last minute practices that the crews as well as the town of Poughkeepsie, are undergoing to prepare for the Regatta which will be held on Tuesday.

Kelley, Robert F., "Regatta On Hudson Listed For June 18/ Tuesday Date is Selected for Intercollegiate Rowing Association Races/ M'Bain Succeeds Benson/ Latter Resigns After Serving as Executive Secretary of Organization 25 Years." New York TIMES, January 26, 1940; Page 22, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on Tuesday, June 18th. The times of the races will begin with the Freshmen at 4:00, followed by the Jayvee's at 5:00 and the Varsity at 6:00. Invitations to join the Regatta will be sent out to five institutions, California, Washington, Wisconsin, Princeton, and MIT. The article also announces that Mr. Benson, executive secretary of the board gave his resignation due to scheduling conflicts.

Kelley, Robert F., "Regatta On Hudson To Be Held Earlier/ Intercollegiate Stewards Set June 19 as Date – Precedes Yale-Harvard Race/ Fits Into Olympic Trials/ Early Date to Permit Crews Entered to Prepare for Tests at Philadelphia in July." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 20, 1928; Page 16.

This article reveals that the date for the Poughkeepsie Regatta for this year will be June 19th, which for the first time in their history will be before the Yale-Harvard race. The early date of the Regatta ensures that any school that wishes to try out for the Olympics will be able to prepare and enter the Olympic trials.

Kelley, Robert F. "Regatta, Rich in Tradition, Held Interest of the Entire Nation/ Greatest Crews in History Rowed Over Poughkeepsie Course, Originally an Old Dutch Sailing Stretch – Leader, Fish and Callow Among Famous Oarsmen Who Competed." New York TIMES, January 13, 1933; Page 20, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article gives a history of the Regatta. It goes into why the Regatta began, how the course was decided upon, and who the original members were. It covers Cornell's outstanding history in the Regatta, the entrance of other teams, and the introduction and impact of the West Coast on the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Notable oarsmen that had rowed in the Regatta are listed, as well as the records for all participating crew teams throughout the years.

Kelley, Robert F., "Reserves To Row On Hudson Today/ Columbia, Cornell, and Syracuse Eights Meet in Informal Races at Poughkeepsie/ Francis In Cornell Shell/ Replaces Hopper, Ill With Tonsillitis – Anderson, Navy, Unlikely to Start in Tomorrow's Classic." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1927; Page 21.

This article reveals the status of all the crews on the day before the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as all the last minute preparations that they are going through to prepare. Updates are also given on some injured crew members for various schools.

Kelley, Robert F., "Rowing Fans Pour Into Poughkeepsie for Today's Intercollegiate Regatta/ 18 Crews On Edge For Title Regatta/ California, Cornell Are Joint Choices in Varsity Race – Washington Well Liked/ Keen Contest Expected/ Feature Not to Start Until 8 P.M. – Huskies Favored in Cub, J.V. Tests Today." New York TIMES, June 22, 1936; Page 25, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reviews the atmosphere in Poughkeepsie the day before the big race. There wasn't much action coming from any of the crews. Aside from a few walks the day was used to rest, and all the crews stayed well away from the swelling crowds of spectators who have come to cheer their favorites on. The expectations for winners remain the same. California and Cornell are considered the favorites for the Varsity race, with Washington close behind. However it is noted that all the crews are in great form this year, and it is possible that an upset could occur. Washington is still considered the favorite in the Junior Varsity and freshmen races, although there are several good contenders in both races. A brief program of the Regatta is listed, as well as a listing of the members of every single boat that's racing.

Kelley, Robert F., "Rutgers Among 9 Varsity Crews in Poughkeepsie Regatta June 25/ Four Coast Eights To Row on Hudson/ California and Washington to Send Varsities, Jayvees – Robbins Is Referee/ Bid Accepted By Rutgers/ Fleet of 9 in 4-Mile Race Is Largest Since '29 – Draw for Lanes Is Made." New York TIMES, June 5, 1941; Page 30, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the upcoming Poughkeepsie Regatta. Rutgers officially announced that it would attend the Regatta, and the draw for lanes was made. The times will remain the same with the freshmen race beginning at 4:45. Columbia is already practicing on the river, and Syracuse will be following them soon. Washington is looked at as the favorite in the Junior Varsity race, and one of the strong contenders for the Varsity event. It was also announced that Mr. Howard Robbins would be succeeding Julian W. Curtiss, who resigned as the referee for the Poughkeepsie Regatta after more than thirty years in that position.

Kelley, Robert F., "Shimp Again Pacing Columbia Oarsmen/Returns to Stroke, but Murphy Remains in Varsity Shell, Moving to No. 6/Syracuse Shifts Boating/Crowley Replaces Bettinger, Out With an Injury – Lion Cubs Row Full 2 Miles." New York TIMES, June 9, 1936; Page 32, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the hard day of workouts the crews participated in today. Some of the crews are starting to row against the clock, and it is expected that by the end of the week most of the crews will have participated in some sort of time trial. Columbia is still making a lot of changes in seating. Shimp is back as stroke for the Varsity boat. Syracuse's Varsity stroke has injured his hand, but the coach is very hopeful that he will be back in time for the Regatta.

Kelley, Robert F. "Sixteen College Crews Will Row in the Poughkeepsie Regatta Today/ Oarsmen On Edge For Hudson Races/ California Favorite in Seven Crew Varsity Contest Today at Poughkeepsie/ Navy Hope Of The East/ Five Freshmen, Four Jayvee Eights to Row – Governor Lehman Expected to Attend/ Program for Today's Races." New York TIMES, June 18, 1935; Page 27, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

The main focus of this article is speculating on who will win the Poughkeepsie Regatta today. There is betting going on, and stakes posted, as there is every year. It seems that California is the favorite for the varsity race, Washington is the favorite for the jayvee race, and Navy and Columbia are tied for favorites in the freshmen race. However although these teams are the favorites, there is no guarantee, there is no one team that clearly outshines everyone else, therefore there is no chance of an upset this year. All the teams are so closely ranked together, that any one of them has a fair chance of winning. The article claims that there hasn't been a race where the winner was so up in the air at the Poughkeepsie Regatta in many years. There are two charts in this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Spuhn Again Shifts Penn Varsity Boat/ Kelleher Is Returned to No. 2, While Borie Is Sent to Second Shell as Stroke/ Columbia Has Two Drills/ Duplicates Philadelphia Squad's Hard Rowing, but Coach Glendon Keeps His Crews Intact." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1927; Page 39.

This article details the practices of Pennsylvania and Columbia, both had hard workouts again. It also reveals that Washington is due to arrive on Monday.

Kelley, Robert F., "Syracuse Crews Stage Time Trial/ Rough Water Keeps Ten Eyck From Obtaining Accurate Check on Varsity/ Garhart, Huskie Cub, Ill/ Schutt Takes His No. 4 Seat – Wisconsin Rows 4 Miles at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, June 15, 1939; Page 32, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes how all the crews had a frustrating day of practice because of bad weather and rough wind. Syracuse, in particular, suffered because the coach was hoping to get a time trial in, and although they did have one, their time was very slow because of the bad conditions. All crews ran double workouts today, but no one was able to put in a very hard workout because of the conditions. Washington is still looking impressive, however one of their freshmen members became sick today and it is unsure if he will make it back for the Regatta, nor what effect his absence will have on the Cubs performance.

Kelley, Robert F., "Syracuse Eight Dark-Horse Entry In Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie/ Men Work Well Together and Have Nice Run To Shell – Hume, Washington Stroke, Engages in Double Workout." New York TIMES, June 30, 1938; Page 30, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the day's workouts by all squads. Many teams took it easy because it was a very hot day. The only team that had a double workout was Washington's boat with their stroke Dom Hume. The Huskies are trying to get him back into racing condition, and although they haven't put their whole strength into any race yet they appear to be working well and it looks as though Hume will be able to row at the Regatta. Prospects do not look so good for the injured men of Columbia and Navy, however, and they are not healing well. The biggest surprise on the river so far has been Syracuse, who have been rowing very easy practices since they arrived. This is in sharp contrast to the hard workouts they usually have prior to the Regatta.

Kelley, Robert F., "Syracuse Joins Crews On Hudson/ Colony at Poughkeepsie Now Complete Save for Cornell – 20 Shells Out on River/ Washington Begins Work/ California Has Double Session and Shows Power – Columbia Also Has Two Workouts." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1928; Page 29.

This article announces that Syracuse has arrived on the Hudson to begin practice. With the exception of Cornell, all crews participating in the Regatta are on the Hudson. It also describes some changes that coaches are making in their boats, as well as the practices that some schools have been taking.

Kelley, Robert F., "Two Members of Washington Varsity, Reporting Ill, Miss Drills on Hudson/ Illness sets back Washington Crew/ Argersinger, Moore, Suffering From Stomach Ailments, Miss Two Drills/ May Work Out Friday/ Two Syracuse Boatings Still Indefinite for Hudson Regatta June 16." New York TIMES, June 7, 1934; Page 34, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reveals that two of Washington's varsity crew members have a slight case of the gripe, and were unable to practice today. This was disheartening news to a crew that was considered one of the favorites. The doctors believe, however, that both men will be able to be back in time for the race. Washington's crew still practiced today, using substitutes in the men's place. There was wide spread sympathy for Washington amongst all the teams today, and several schools offered the varsity crew their extra men as substitutes so that they could continue to practice while waiting for their men to heal. The article also noted how Washington was one of the few crews remaining that had an old boathouse with shower water being pumped from the river, instead of hot city water coming through pipes. The article also mentioned how Syracuse was considered to be one of the best East coast teams this year, and that their coach still had not settled on a lineup for his varsity or junior varsity teams.

Kelley, Robert F., "Unbeaten Cornell Varsity Crew Favored to Triumph on Hudson Today/ 18 Eights To Start In Rowing Classic/ Keen Competition Promised in Three Contests of 43d Poughkeepsie Regatta/ 8 Boats In Varsity Test/ Cornell, Washington Choices in Evenly Balanced Field for 4-Mile Race Today." New York TIMES, June 18, 1940; Page 32, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article sets the tone for tomorrow's Regatta. Its purpose is to build the readers anticipation for the all important varsity race. It mentions briefly that all crews went out for a light paddle last night in the face of bad weather, in case that weather carries over until tomorrow. It also briefly discusses how Washington and Cornell are the favorites, although the only two considered out of the picture are Wisconsin and Princeton. There is a picture and two charts with this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington 7-10 Favorite to Triumph in Poughkeepsie Varsity Race Today/ College Oarsmen Ready for Regatta/ 50,000 Will Watch Contests – Navy, California Ranked Next to Washington/ Syracuse is Dark Horse/ Huskies Choice Among Jayvees – Wide-Open Freshman Race is Predicted." New York TIMES, June 22, 1937; Page 29, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the activities and emotions that come with the day before the Poughkeepsie Regatta. State Troopers were stationed before each boathouse, and nobody without official business would be bothering the waiting oarsmen. Everyone was out for some light practice today and the opinion still remains the same. Washington is largely considered the favorite, with Navy and California considered strong possibilities for second. It is also speculated that Washington could repeat its brilliant sweep performance of last year, although the freshmen race is considered to be anyone's race. There is one picture, a brief program, and a chart of the boating's with this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Aims To Repeat Sweep/ Huskies' Varsity and Juniors, Closely Rated, Favored to Win on Hudson Tuesday/ Hard Battle on Thames/ Yale and Harvard Heading for Classic Struggle Friday – Bright Setting for Crews." New York TIMES, June 20, 1937; Sec. 5, Page 3, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article sets the scene for the upcoming Poughkeepsie Regatta. It announces that the overwhelming favorite to win the varsity race is Washington. Navy is also considered to be a serious contender, and California, although much weaker than they have been in past years is still a dangerous threat. The start of the race is going to be one of the earliest it has been in a long time. The freshmen will kick things off at 3:00, and if all goes according to plan the Varsity race will begin at 5:00. A huge observation train of 21 cars will be filled to capacity, and the Coast Guard is expecting the biggest flotilla of yachts and chartered steamers, including two Hudson River Day Liners, that this race has ever seen. This article has one photograph.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Crew Threat On Hudson/ Huskies Show Evidence of Power, Despite Presence of Five Sophomores/ Much Depends On Start/ Coach Ulbrickson Respects All Three California Eights – Navy Boat Shifted." New York TIMES, June 16, 1939; Page 32, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses Washington and its chances in this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. The general opinion is that Washington has a very good chance, and they have been looking well at practice on the Hudson. It is a very new crew, and not one of the members have participated in a varsity race at Poughkeepsie yet, so it will be interesting to see if that will have any effect. Washington's coach thinks his crew is very well prepared and could win if they row to their potential. He also acknowledges that there are many other very good crews in the race, most notably California, and it will be tight competition. All crews were able to put in a workout today, but those who wanted a second workout at night were held up yet again because of bad weather. There is a picture on this page.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Crews First In Two Races; 100,000 Line Hudson/ Varsity Beats Navy by Only 15 Feet After a Stirring Duel Over Four-Mile Course/ Syracuse Comes In Next/ Leads Other Five, but is Six Lengths Back of Leaders – Washington Juniors Win/ Columbia Freshmen Score/ Set Pace All the Way and California Takes their Wake – 34 Cars in Observations Train Jammed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1926; Page 1.

This article announces that Washington won the Varsity and Junior Varsity races, while Columbia won the Freshmen race. A detailed description of the Varsity race, spectators, weather, as well as descriptions of the other two races make up the rest of the article. There are two pictures and one chart in this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Crews Row To Dead Heat/ Varsity Closes Strongly to Catch Jayvees in 4-Mile Time Race on Hudson/ Cornell Also Has Trial/ Yale Flashes Fine Effort in Covering Thames Course – Harvard's Drill Light." New York TIMES, June 19, 1937; Page 11, Col.8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes what each school did to practice for the Regatta; however the story of the day was the time trial by Washington. Washington's Varsity and Jayvee went head to head on the Hudson, and they finished in a dead heat. The author describes the race as one of the best four mile crew races that the Hudson had ever seen, and the crews were from one school. Only once in the history of college four-mile racing has there been a dead heat. The tie was between Oxford and Cambridge, and it occurred in 1877. After the spectacular showing by both crews, the coach, Al Ulbrickson announced that the Varsity would definitely be rowing in the big race at the Regatta.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Crews Take All Three Poughkeepsie Races Second Straight Year/ Record Climaxes Washington Sweep/ Varsity Rows Four Miles in 18:33 3/5 for Another Grand Slam on Hudson/ Navy Holds Off Cornell/ Middies, Nearly Four Lengths Back of Leaders, Second After Tense Battle." New York TIMES, June 23, 1937; Page 31, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington once again swept the Poughkeepsie Regatta and won all three races on the Hudson. This is the first time in the history of college rowing that a school has swept a championship two years in a row. With the exception of the coxswain, the Washington Varsity crew was exactly the same as the one who finished the sweep of the Hudson last year, and those men have written their names into history. Besides winning all three races, the varsity beat the record set by California in 1928 by 2 3/5 of a second. The article goes on to describe the Varsity race in detail. Although there was a fight for the first two miles, once Washington began moving forward there was no stopping. They ended the race with almost four lengths of open water between them and their closest competitor, Navy. In the end of the race Navy had to battle it out with Cornell for second place, but in the end the Middies held out. California was never a contender in the race. This article has two pictures and four charts.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Easy Victor in Poughkeepsie Varsity Race, With California Next/ Huskies Again Take Laurels On Hudson/ Washington Varsity, Victor in 1940, Beats California by 2 ½ Lengths – Cornell 3d/ 25,000 See The Regatta/ Bears Annex Jayvee Contest – Strong Spurt by Ithacans Wins Freshman Event." New York TIMES, June 26, 1941; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Washington Huskies once again won the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The Huskies really dominated the course, finishing by 2 ½ lengths over second place California. Cornell came in third place, which it had to fight hard for, because the rest of the crews were not far behind. Columbia had been doing very well in the race, when their no. 2 man collapsed, and they had to finish the race with only seven men. California won a hard fought junior varsity race, and Cornell came from behind to win the freshmen race. 25,000 people came to watch the race this year, and they were piled on the observation train, boats and yachts, and on the shorelines. The weather was beautiful and it was a great day for a Regatta. This page has one picture and two charts.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Gains Sweep In Regatta At Poughkeepsie/ Huskies Row to First Triple Victory on Hudson Since 1912 as 70,000 Look On/ Varsity Wins By Length/ Comes Up From Last Place to Beat California at Finish – Navy 3d, Columbia 4th/ Cornell Fifth Over Line/ Victors Point or the Olympics – Jayvees Score by 3 Lengths and Freshmen by One." New York TIMES, June 23, 1936; Page 1, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington swept the Poughkeepsie Regatta. No team had won all three races at Poughkeepsie since 1912 and the Washington Huskies rowed their way into history with their brilliant display. Cornell, the hope of the East Coast was never able to get going, and Navy ended up having the best showing for the East coast teams. The conditions for the races were ideal, and one of the biggest crowds in history gathered to watch, numbering close to 70,000 spectators. All three races began almost exactly on time. The freshmen race was hard fought between California and Washington, but the Huskies eventually prevailed to have a one length victory. The same occurred with the Junior Varsity race. In each race Washington stroked low until the end where they turned it up to pass all those in front of them. This should have prepared spectators for the Varsity race, but it did not. After the start Washington stroked very low and was in last place for the first three miles of the four mile race and the crowd all but forgot about them; they were more concerned with the magnificent fight going on between California, Navy, and Columbia. However at the start of the last mile Washington kicked it up into high gear jumping from stroking a 30 to a 35. Someone spotted them moving up past all the crews in front of them and the crows went absolutely wild. Don Hume, the stroke of the Huskies continued to push his crew higher, until they were stroking an almost unheard of 40. They passed California a few feet from the finish to win the most brilliant and exciting race that the Poughkeepsie Regatta had ever seen. This page has two pictures on it and four charts.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Beats Cornell Varsity by Three Quarters of a Length on Hudson/ Huskies Triumph In Last Few Yards/ Washington Varsity Overtakes Cornell, Then Juniors Win in Dark at Poughkeepsie/ Big Race Delayed 3 Hours/ Crews Swamped When Jayvee Event is First Attempted – Ithaca Freshmen Victors." New York TIMES, June 19, 1940; Page 28, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington won this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta, with Cornell in second and Syracuse in third place. This year's Regatta was hard-fought and also very unusual. There was a horrible wind that made the river a mess of waves. The Jayvee race had only gone one mile when it was called to a halt with four crews underwater and another with a boat that was smashed beyond repair. The Varsity event was postponed three hours while waiting for the weather to cooperate, and when they finally did get underway it still wasn't great conditions. Despite this, Washington, Cornell, Navy, and Syracuse all fought gamely for the win, and in the last mile Washington and Cornell each had the lead twice before Washington managed to hold onto the lead till the finish. The Jayvee race went off after the Varsity event for the first time in history, with no spectators because it had already been announced that the event was cancelled. The Junior Varsity crews were at the starting line, however, and insisted on running their race. They rowed the three miles in the pitch dark with only spotlights to light the way, and in the end Washington won the event. There are two pictures and two charts on this page.

Kelley, Robert F., "Washington Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie; Navy Due Today/ Syracuse Displays Speed In Workout/ Covers 4 Miles on Hudson at High Beat – Cornell Varsity Impresses River Colony/ Huskies In Double Drill/ Ulbrickson Admits Strength of Washington's Big Eight – Princeton in Trial." New York TIMES, June 12, 1940; Page 37, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts how the teams did at practice today. A lot of focus was put on Washington in this article, who have come East with an impressive record and a reputation for power and speed. They looked a little rough at practice but that's to be expected after four days on a train. Their coach Al Ulbrickson mentions that there is still a lot of work to do. Cornell is still looking excellent and they are being watched closely by rival teams. Princeton is looking good and seems to be enjoying their first visit to the Hudson.

Kelley, Robert F., "Well-Conditioned Penn Crew Arrives at Scene of College Regatta/Penn Join Fleet At Poughkeepsie/Varsity, Only Quaker Crew in College Regatta, Goes Out for Four-Mile Paddle/Murphy Columbia Stroke/Sophomore Replaces Shimp-Syracuse Oarsmen Stage Double Workout." New York TIMES, June 5, 1936; Page 27, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Penn crews have arrived in Poughkeepsie to train for the Regatta that will be held on June 22nd. This is the earliest that Penn has ever arrived in Poughkeepsie, which shows their determination to shine this year. They are considered to be one of the favored east coast teams this year. Since there are a few weeks left to go before the Regatta, some of the teams are still making changes on the lineup for their crews. Columbia placed Murphy as the Varsity stroke during practice, instead of Shimp, and they are seeing what unfolds from that development. Syracuse held a double workout today, which is sure to be echoed by many teams in the coming weeks as the long anticipated Regatta looms closer.

Kelley, Robert F., "Western Eights Reach Camp/ Washington Crew Talk Of The River/ Interest of Hudson Observers Centers on Favorites, Who Hold First Workout/ Wisconsin Joins Fleet/ 17 Eights Training at Scene of Races – Poughkeepsie Taking on Regatta Air." New York TIMES, June 17, 1941; Page 29, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington and Wisconsin have arrived on the Hudson to begin practicing for the big event. The only crew that is now missing is MIT. Most of the attention was focused on Washington, who is highly regarded as one of the favorites for the Regatta. California is also thought to have a good chance, despite having a very new crew. Their coach feels they have really come together since their loss to Washington earlier in the season. Most crews just participated in routine workouts.

Kelley, Robert F., "Western Oarsmen Arrive On Hudson/ Washington Crews Follow California Into Camp at Poughkeepsie Course/ Fourteen Shells On River/ Only Syracuse and Cornell Navies Missing – Columbia, Navy and Penn Drill." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1928; Page 33.

This article announces that California and Washington arrived in Poughkeepsie to begin practice. It comments on their trip, what they did as soon as they arrived and the status of their crews. It also gives a very brief account of the practice that eastern teams held that morning.

Kelley, Robert F., "Whitecaps Hinder Eights on Hudson/ But All Three Navies Get on River – Shake-up in View for Columbia Freshmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1926; Page 17.

This article describes how the weather is effecting the crews on the Hudson, and the practices that they are doing in spite of the rain, wind, and waves.

Kelley, Robert F., "Wide Open Varsity Race Looms in Revival of Poughkeepsie Regatta Today/ 18 College Crews Ready For Regatta/ Seven Varsity, Five Jayvee and Six Freshmen Eights to Row at Poughkeepsie/ Excitement Runs High/ Close Fight Looms in Main Race Today, Coast Boats Being Slight Favorites." New York TIMES, June 16, 1934; Page 9, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article lists a very brief program of the Regatta that will be held today. The article discusses the excitement in Poughkeepsie today, and the amount of speculation that is going on with people wondering who will come away the victors today. The town is packed and so are the observation train cars. The article discusses how there is no clear cut favorite this year, and that every single crew, with the exception of Columbia this year, is considered a threat to the title. Finally all 18 boats and their crews are listed, as well as where each man would be rowing in the boat. There is a picture of California rowing in this article.

Kelley, Robert F., "Wind Blows Crews Off Hudson River/ Sudden Storm at Poughkeepsie Prevents the Shells From Taking Workouts/ Penn Varsities Heave To/ Red and Blue Forced to Seek Shelter of Cornell Boathouse – Press Launch Caught in Gale." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1926; Page 21.

This article reports that a large storm came through Poughkeepsie preventing any crews from practicing today. The Pennsylvania crews were caught out on the river and were forced to take shelter at the Cornell boathouse because they were unable to make it back to their own.

Kelley, Robert F., "Wisconsin Crew At Poughkeepsie/ Penn Oarsmen Also Join Columbia to Train for Regatta on the Hudson/ Quakers Lose Coxswain/ Plugfelder is Unable to Make the Trip – Glendon Shakes Up His Junior Varsity Eight." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1926; Page 15.

This article announces that Wisconsin and Pennsylvania has joined Columbia on the Hudson for practice, and it also reveals some changes that Columbia's coach has made in his junior varsity crew.

Kelley, Robert F., "Wisconsin Expected to Return to Poughkeepsie Regatta, Listed for June 22/ Earlier Start Set For Hudson Crews/ Poughkeepsie Regatta June 22 to Start at 3 P.M. With 2-Mile Cub Race/ Varsity Two Hours Later/ Fleet of Eight in Main Event Looms With Wisconsin Expected Back." New York TIMES, January 22, 1937; Page 15, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the results of the meeting of the Board of Stewards. This year's Poughkeepsie Regatta is set for June 22nd. The first race will begin at 3 p.m. which is several hours earlier than the race is usually held. The tides and the conditions of the river are what determine the starting times, and this year there will be an earlier start than the Regatta has seen in many years. The stewards were also happy to announce that it is a good possibility that Wisconsin will be attending the Regatta again this year. Wisconsin has always been a good western contender, but they had been absent from the Regatta since 1930. Invitations will be sent out to all the usual candidates, as well as M.I.T. and Princeton.

Kelley, Robert F., "Wisconsin Rows Four Miles In 19:40/ Coach Walz Terms Varsity's Trial for Race Wednesday Fairly Satisfactory/ Freshmen Flash Power/ Others Hold Short Workouts – Mentors Attend Dinner – Nova Visits Crews." New York TIMES, June 23, 1941; Page 24, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses how practice went for the crews today. Wisconsin held a time trial, and turned in a respectable time. All other crews held easy practices. Peter H. Troy, former Regatta chairman came to visit, and he will host the coaches dinner. The Wisconsin camp was also visited by heavyweight challenger, Lou Nova, who will remain until Wednesday to watch the race.

"Kieran, John., "Sports of the Times." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 4, 1927; Page 12.

This article talks about upsets that happened in amateur sports this year, and discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta, with Columbia beating all the favorites to come out on top.

Kieran, John. "Sports of the Times." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1928; Page 25.

This article talks about the upcoming regatta. It talks about where the fans are coming from and the kinds of cheers and comments you would hear as you stood on the sidelines. It also compares the east coast and west coast teams, and predicts which is most likely to win the regatta.

Kieran, John. "Sports of the Times." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1929; Page S2.

This article briefly discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta and which teams have a claim to possibly winning the Regatta and why.

Kieran, John. "Sports of the Times." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1929; Page 25.

This article describes what it's like to in Poughkeepsie on the day of the Regatta, the tales people will tell, the observation train, the parade, and finally, the Regatta itself.

Kieran, John., "Sports of the Times." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1927; Page 23.

This article talks about the Poughkeepsie Regatta, discussing the history, the prize all the crews are striving for, and the enthusiasm of the crowds.

Kieran, John. "Sports of the Times/ A Long Pull." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1927; Page 19.

This article reveals that Columbia has been picked as the "dark horse" to win the Poughkeepsie Regatta race. Their season this year has not been overly impressive, but their coaches are still optimistic.

Kieran, John., "Sports of the Times/ Brisk Work Up the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1927; Page 25.

This article very briefly discusses the chances each school has at winning the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Kloth Shifted to Stroke of Columbia Shell In Drastic Shake-Up at Poughkeepsie Drill." New York TIMES, June 10, 1936; Page 30, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Columbia, which has been making seat adjustments all week, has just made another major change in the Varsity shell. Only one crew member has his original seat. It will be interesting to see how this new arrangement unfolds. The weather continues to be favorable. California is expected to arrive tomorrow with Washington following two days behind.

"Large Crowd Sees Race/Weather Fails to Diminish Splendor of Regatta on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1916; Page 19.

This article describes the crowds at the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the amount of spectators, their reaction to the races, and the betting that was going on.

"Last Crew Work Light/ Choppy Water Allows Little Practice for College Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1916; Page 12.

A description of one of the last practices the crew have before the Regatta, and how the weather effected it.

"Leader Picks Washington/ Stevens Also Predicts Victory for Coast Crew on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1925; Page 14.

This article reveals that the Harvard and Yale crew coaches believe that Washington will win the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Leland Stanford Crew On The Hudson/ Californians Come to Poughkeepsie Without Coach – Their Boat Delayed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 13, 1912; Page 9.

This article announces that Stanford arrived on the Hudson today for their first Poughkeepsie Regatta. Their coach did not make the journey with them, which is highly unusual. One of the crew members will be filling in his place as coach. They had further difficulties when their shell did not arrive. Hopefully it will arrive tomorrow. The other crews that were already on the river held practices today, preparing themselves for the Regatta.

"Leland Stanford to Row Here." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 25, 1915; Page S2.

This article announces that Stanford will be coming to the Hudson to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Light Work For Oarsmen/ Coach Courtney Still Undecided About Cornell Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1920; Page 19.

All of the crews at Ithaca engaged in light practices today, and Coach Courtney still has not decided which crew will represent Cornell in the varsity event.

"Likely To Return To Poughkeepsie/ Rowing Men Believe Intercollegiate Race Will Be Held on Old Course in 1921." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Nov. 28, 1920; Page 105.

Many people are under the opinion that the regatta will return to Poughkeepsie next year. Although Ithaca tried hard, people did not enjoy the course as much as the Hudson and it is almost certain that the observation train will be able to be back in action for next summer.

"Lists Time Schedule of Poughkeepsie Races." New York TIMES, May 17, 1934; Page 31, Col 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reveals what times each of the three crew races will be held at the Regatta this year. It also announces the crews that will be participating in the varsity race: Cornell, Pennsylvania, Columbia, Syracuse, Washington, California, Navy, and Marietta. This announcement confirms that there will be a freshman race this year, and it will be held at 5:30 on June 16th. Furthermore, the observation train will be operating this year, something that had been up for debate for awhile, and the ticket prices have been reduced.

"Long Rows For Columbia/ Coach Rice Sends Crews Up to Esopus Island and Return." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1915; Page 11.

This article briefly describes the practices Columbia has been having to prepare for the Regatta.

"Longer Work For Crews/ Columbia Squad to Go to Poughkeepsie 24 Days Before Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 1, 1920; Page S2.

Columbia will begin practice on the Hudson for the Regatta 24 days before the race is set to begin, a very long training period. Coach Rice is also not planning on having easier practices even though the varsity race is a mile shorter than normal.

"Main Race At The Poughkeepsie Regatta Will Be Shortened To Three Miles/ Three Mile Race For Poughkeepsie/ C. H. Mapes Says Decision Made Just Before the War Will Not Be Changed/ May Mean More Entries/ Wisconsin Likely to Send a 'Varsity Eight and Possibly Princeton and Navy." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Oct. 16, 1919; Page 27.

The decision that was made before the war to shorten the Poughkeepsie varsity race to three miles will be upheld next year when the regatta is resumed. The Board of Stewards are anticipating more entries next year because of the shortened distance.

"Many Unable to Attend." New York TIMES, July 2, 1938; Page 9, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is a letter to the sports editor of the New York Times. The author wants to know why the Poughkeepsie Regatta is never held on a weekend. They feel that there are many fans out there who would love to attend the Regatta, but are unable to because they can't take time off in the middle of the week. The editor replies that the Regatta's date is picked so that the race occurs at the best tide conditions. The editor also feels that they may avoid weekend dates to avoid an overwhelming amount of onshore and aquatic traffic.

"Mapes Re-elected as Steward." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 5, 1916; Page 12.

This article announces that Charles Mapes has been re-elected as chairman of the Board of Stewards for the Intercollegiate Rowing Association.

"Marietta Seeks Regatta/ Ohio River Town Asks Shift of Poughkeepsie Classic." New York TIMES, November 12, 1949; Page 10, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the town of Marietta, Ohio is requesting the board of stewards to move the Poughkeepsie Regatta to its town. The stewards announced that they would consider all requests to move the location at their annual meeting.

"Marietta To Row In Hudson Regatta/ Entry of Ohio College Raises Expected Participants in June 16 Event to Eight." New York TIMES, March 21, 1934; Page 30, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Marietta College will definitely be competing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, although they cannot say which race they will be entering. This announcement makes Marietta the first college to confirm that it will be participating in this year's Regatta. Despite this fact, it is firmly believed that at least five other colleges will be competing in the races.

Marvin, George. "New National Sport/ Remarkable Spread of Rowing from Big Colleges – The National Development Similar to Football's – Fine Points to Be Watched for in a Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1922; Page 85.

Rowing has become the new national sport with thousands of fans and lots of heated competition that culminates with the Poughkeepsie Regatta and the New London race every year. This article talks about crew's rise to popularity.

"May Drop Orange Crews/ Stewards Likely to Exclude Syracuse from Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 28, 1916; Page 6.

This article reveals that Syracuse may not be invited to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. There is speculation that this may occur, either because of a rumor that Syracuse is not intending to enter a crew into the Regatta, or because of eligibility requirements that Syracuse may have violated.

"May Race Down Stream/ Poughkeepsie Regatta Committee Present an Ultimatum to Mr. Van Duzer." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 27, 1897; Page 2.

The Poughkeepsie Committee has let Mr. Van Duzer know that they will not have anything to do with policing the course; the most they will do is contribute $75 to the cause.

"May Row At Ithaca June 24/ Place for Intercollegiate Regatta is Still Undecided." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 14, 1916; Page 12.

This article states the opinion that most likely the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be rowed on Cayuga Lake this year, although the official word has not been given.

"May Shorten Crew Race/ Cornell to Take Initiative in Reducing Poughkeepsie Event." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Nov. 21, 1914; Page 14.

This article announces that Cornell is planning on taking the initiative in getting the Poughkeepsie race shortened to three miles.

"McKinley May See The Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1897; Page 3.

The President's Secretary has reserved tickets on the observation train so the President can watch the Yale-Harvard-Cornell race.

"Measles Suspected in Jayvee's Illness At California Rowing Camp on Hudson." New York TIMES, June 18, 1941; Page 29, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that one of the members of California's crew may have measles, although their coach would not confirm that claim until the Poughkeepsie physician examines him. If the rumor ends up being true, it is unknown what kind of impact that will have on the rest of the crews on the Hudson.

"The Microphone Will Present – Intercollegiate Regatta to Be Described by Announcers in Airplane, on Motor Boat, And on Shore." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1929; Page XX17.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be broadcast on the air by WABC, WJZ, WEAF.

"Middies End Practice/ Oarsmen Have Last Home Workout Before Leaving for Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1922; Page 23.

Navy will be leaving tomorrow for Poughkeepsie but is not expected to arrive until Thursday.

"Middies Get Permission to Row." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 2, 1907; Page 9.

This article announces that the Navy midshipmen gained permission to participate in that year's Poughkeepsie Regatta from the Secretary of the Navy.

"Middies May Row At Poughkeepsie/ Navy to Give Serious Consideration to Matter of Entering Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 11, 1920; Page 18.

There is a good possibility that Navy will enter a crew next year in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

" 'Middies' To Row At Poughkeepsie/ Secretary Metcalf Grants Permission to Compete in Intercollegiate Regatta/ Will Have Strong Crew/ Have Already Defeated Georgetown and Look for Victories Over Both Yale's and Columbia's Eights." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 14, 1907; Page S3.

This article announces that Navy has been granted permission by Secretary Metcalf from the Navy Department to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Middies Unlikely To Row/ Date of Poughkeepsie Regatta Too Late for Naval Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 30, 1920; Page 17.

The Navy crews will most likely not be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta because the proposed date is very close to their practice cruse that they must go on.

"Middies Want to Row/ Cadets Seek Permission to Compete in Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 26, 1912; Page C7.

This article mentions how the crew team at the Naval Academy is asking the school to reconsider their decision that they will not participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta anymore. Although the decision is still officially no, their request is being taken under consideration.

"Middy Crew Being Polished By Coach/ Glendon and His Pupils Are Hopeful of Victory in Regatta at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1922; Page 30.

The Navy crew is putting in a lot of preparation for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, if they were able to win this year it would be the crowning achievement on a great three year run, and a wonderful way to end for the seven varsity seniors who will be leaving after this year.

"M.I.T. Enters Freshmen in Poughkeepsie Race; Washington Crews to Start East on June 8." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 28, 1929; Page 39.

This article confirms that M.I.T. is sending their freshmen crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and that Washington will be leaving on June 8th for the Hudson.

"M.I.T. Entry Deferred/ Decision on Poughkeepsie Regatta Awaits Race Against Harvard." ProQuest Historical Newspapers the New York TIMES, Apr. 30, 1929; Page 39.

This article announces that M.I.T. will not make a decision about entering the Poughkeepsie Regatta until they see how their crew does racing against Harvard.

"M.I.T. Gets Permission to Row In Poughkeepsie Varsity Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 13, 1929; Page 29.

This article reveals that M.I.T. has been granted permission to row in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"More Crews On Hudson/ Pennsylvania and Syracuse Oarsmen Arrive for Regatta Work." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1914; Page 8.

Pennsylvania arrived on the Hudson, and held their first practice. The article also mentions what other crews did for practice, as well as when more crews are scheduled to arrive.

"More Observation Cars Ordered for Crew Race." New York TIMES, June 14, 1934; Page 31, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that there is so much interest in this years' Poughkeepsie Regatta that the 13 observation train cars have already been sold out, and more have been ordered to meet the increasing demand.

"Nagler To Give Up California Berth/ Assistant to Coach Ebright to Stay With Oarsmen Until After Poughkeepsie Races/ Washington To Row Today/ Spuhn Sends Away Three Penn Crews in Time Trials – Columbia Jayvees Also Get Fast Spin." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1926; Page S3.

This article announces that Washington will be leaving for the Hudson, as well as reporting on some time trials that crews undertook, and practices.

"Navy Agrees to Row Over 4-Mile Course at Poughkeepsie; at Least 7 Crews Assured." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 12, 1925; Page 13.

This article announces that Navy will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Navy and Cornell Arrive/ All Crews at Poughkeepsie for College Regatta Saturday." New York TIMES, June 12, 1939; Page 24, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the last two crews left to arrive on the Hudson, Cornell and Navy, arrived today. Neither was able to put in a workout today, and the rest of the teams took the day off as well.

"Navy And Penn Join Columbia Oarsmen/ Boats Not Rigged, Middies Forced to Rest – Penn Also Idle at Poughkeepsie/ Lions Have Long Row/ Coach Glendon Directs Four Crews on 12-Mile Paddle – River Men Greet Callow." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1928; Page 27.

This article announces that Pennsylvania and Navy have joined Columbia on the Hudson river for practice, and it gives a brief description of their practices.

"Navy At Poughkeepsie/ Annapolis Men Hope to Send Two Crews To Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, December 10, 1907; Page 15.

This article announces that Navy, which had such a warm welcome to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, wants to have more participation in the Regatta. Annapolis would like to send two or three crews to the Hudson next year. Of course, the Middies need the permission from the Secretary of the Navy, but there is no doubt in anyone's mind that he will grant it. There will most likely only be two crews going, and if that's the case, it will be the Varsity eight and four-oared crews.

"Navy at Poughkeepsie/ Efforts Being Made to Send Crews to Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Sep. 13, 1908; Page S4.

Navy is doing everything in its power to convince their superintendent to allow them to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta next year.

"Navy At Poughkeepsie/ Syracuse Eights Also Arrive at Scene of June 27 Regatta." New York TIMES, June 18, 1938; Page 8, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy and Syracuse arrived in Poughkeepsie today. Syracuse made it in the morning and went out for a practice right away. Navy didn't arrive until the afternoon, and they are scheduled to have their first practice tomorrow morning.

"Navy At Poughkeepsie/ Three-Mile Distance May Overcome Midshipmen's Old Objections." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 20, 1920; Page 18.

Since the Poughkeepsie Regatta is going to be three miles next year, many people are of the opinion that Navy will send a crew to Poughkeepsie to participate.

"Navy Coach, Hurt, To Miss Regatta/ Walsh Is in Hospital With Spine Injury After Fall." New York TIMES, June 21, 1938; Page 21, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Walsh, the head coach of Navy, fell on the steps leaving the Beekman Arms last night and suffered a spinal injury. He was hospitalized and will remain there even after his crews have left. He is expected to recover but will not be able to attend the Regatta. He appointed H. M. Austen, his assistant coach, to stand in his place at the Regatta.

"Navy Crew Covers Four Miles In 19:31/ King Back in Bow as Glendon Sends Varsity Upstream Over the Hudson Course/ Columbia Is Improving/ Rice's Quaker Eight Does Two Miles at Noon in Less Than Ten Minutes." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1927; Page 14.

This article reports on Navy's time trial that they held today, as well as commenting on the practices of the other schools.

"Navy Crew First At Poughkeepsie; Sets New Record/ Olympic Champions Row Three Miles in 13:33 3-5, Breaking Own Mark of 1921/ Washington Close Behind/ Western Eight Falters After Overtaking Navy Near Finish – Columbia Fifth/ Cornell Juniors Triumph/ Syracuse Takes Freshman Race – Thousands Watch Twenty-fifth Annual Regatta on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1922; Page 1.

Navy accomplished what they set out to do and won the Poughkeepsie Regatta yet again, Washington came in second and Syracuse in third. The race is described in detail clearly depicting the fight that all crews put up to win. Cornell won the Junior Varsity race, and that race is described as well. There are several charts in this article.

"Navy Crew Not to Compete In Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 22, 1923; Page 12.

Navy will not be participating in the Intercollegiate regatta due to interference with their practice cruise.

"Navy Crew Off Today/ Will Entrain for Poughkeepsie – Holds Final Spins on Severn." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1925; Page 16.

This article announces that Navy will be leaving today for the Hudson to begin training for Poughkeepsie.

"Navy Crew Ready, Coach Butler Says/ States "Any Eight on the River Will Have to Row to Beat Us."/ Callow Also Is Confident/ Washington Director Wants Oarsmen to Make "Good Showing," but Will Have "No Alibi" if Beaten." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1926; Page 11.

This article reports on the expectations of the coaches for how their crew's will perform in the Regatta.

"Navy Crew Shares Honors With Yale/ Ended Washington's Reign at Poughkeepsie, While Blue Still Remains Unbeaten/ Hoover Leads Americans/ But Failed to Win World Title From Beresford – Many Shifts Among College Coaches." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 27, 1925; Page S6.

This article congratulates Navy on winning the Poughkeepsie Regatta and gives a very brief recap of the races on the Hudson.

"Navy Crew Starts Exodus To Hudson/ Ensign Leaves for Poughkeepsie to Make Arrangements – Ship Shells Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1926; Page 19.

This article announces that the Navy crews will be leaving for Poughkeepsie on Sunday.

"Navy Crew To Row At Poughkeepsie/ Official Notice of Acceptance of Invitation Sent to Intercollegiate Stewards." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 10, 1923; Page 16.

Navy will be sending at least one crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Navy Crew's Entry In Regatta Certain/ Practice Cruise Will Not Go to Europe, Assuring Oarsmen Time to Prepare for Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 25, 1925; Page 24.

This article announces that it is guaranteed that Navy will be sending crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta in June, due to the fact that their practice cruise will be in local waters, rather than foreign.

"Navy Crews Leave June 20/ Academy Oarsmen to Live Near Vassar Campus at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1926; Page 22.

This article announces that Navy has left for Poughkeepsie.

"Navy Crews Row Twice/ Varsity, Jayvee and Plebes Will Hold Double Drills All Week." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1929; Page 44.

This article announces that Navy has begun practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta on their own river, and they will be leaving for Poughkeepsie to continue practice on Sunday.

"Navy Crews Take Spin Of Five Miles/ Oarsmen Are on the Hudson 15 Minutes After Arrival at Poughkeepsie/ Glendon Eights Impress/ Display Speed and Endurance in Drill on Rough Water – Other Shells on River." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1923; Page 9.

Fifteen minutes after Navy arrived in Poughkeepsie they were on the Hudson practicing and impressing everyone. Syracuse went out to practice with them, while the rest of the crews got a later start for the evening practice.

"Navy Drops Anchor On Hudson Course/ Middies' Mysterious Strength in First Appearance Impresses Other Crews/ Redway In Mallory's Seat/ Stricken Penn Oarsmen May Have Rowed Last Race – Callow Shifts Washington." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1925; Page 13.

This article announces that Navy has arrived on the Hudson, and it also reveals a few seating changes that some coaches have made.

"Navy Eights Doubtful Starters in Races At Poughkeepsie Because of Cruise Plans" New York TIMES, January 27, 1934; Page 16, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that it's uncertain how many crews Navy will be able to send to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. Every year Navy has a practice cruise during the summer, and when the cruise is held may interfere with the school's ability to send all crew teams to the Regatta. The concern is that the crew members that have to attend the cruise may not be able to make it back in time for the cruise from the Regatta races. The article also publishes Al Ulbricksen's announcement that if Washington beats California at their yearly race on Lake Washington they will definitely attend the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Navy Feat Tonic For Ailing Coach/ Walsh Overjoyed by Triumph – Spirit Enabled Middies to Row Race as Planned." New York TIMES, June 28, 1938; Page 13, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is an interview with the injured Navy coach. He was able to see some of the Varsity race from his cot, and the rest he heard over the radio. He was extremely happy and proud of his crew. He told the reporter that the crew told him the day before that they had vowed to win the race for him.

"Navy In First Spin At Poughkeepsie/ Middies on Water 20 Minutes After Detraining – Westerners in Fast Trial." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1922; Page 22.

Navy arrived on the Hudson this evening and within twenty minutes were out on the water practicing. Washington participated in a fast time trial, while Syracuse, Cornell, and Pennsylvania all had lively practices.

"Navy May Row at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, October 7, 1909; Page 7.

This article announces that there is a good chance that Navy will be rowing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta next year. The last time Navy rowed in the Poughkeepsie Regatta was in 1907.

"Navy May Row On Hudson/ Will Take Part in Poughkeepsie Regatta Unless Cruise Prevents." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 15, 1924; Page 21.

This article mentions that the Navy crews will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta in June unless it causes them to miss too much of their annual practice cruise.

"Navy May Row On Hudson/ World's Champion Crew Likely to Be Seen at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 14, 1921; Page 19.

The chances of Navy participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta continue to increase due to the fact that the date for the Regatta has been moved up one week.

"Navy Next On Hudson/ All Crews In Poughkeepsie Races to Pitch Camp by June 15." New York TIMES, June 6, 1937; Section 5, Page 4, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that all the racing crews will be in Poughkeepsie by June 15th. Columbia is already there and has been rowing twice a day to get ready. Navy is the next team that is expected to arrive, and they are largely considered to be the hope for the east to break the winning streak of the Western schools.

"Navy Oarsmen on Way." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1927; Page 17.

This article announces that the navy crews have left for Poughkeepsie.

"Navy Oarsmen Return/ Will Leave For Poughkeepsie Regatta on June 10." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 31, 1921; Page 22.

After a brief rest from their last race and victory, Navy will be leaving for Poughkeepsie on June 10th.

"Navy Obtains Quarters/ Rowing Squad to Leave for Poughkeepsie Camp Saturday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1921; Page 24.

Quarters have been found for the Navy crew so they are all set to leave for the Hudson.

"Navy Officially Declines To Enter College Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1920; Page 23.

Navy will not be sending a crew to the college regatta in Ithaca due to the fact that their crew teams have already stopped practicing for the season.

"Navy Out Of Hudson Race/ Oarsmen Will Not Make Trip to Poughkeepsie Regatta." New York TIMES, April 5, 1941; Page 12, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy will not be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. The Middies have a shortened Academic schedule this year, and they will need all of the summer months to be at sea. Their crew will only be rowing in four races the entire season.

"Navy Passes Time Trial." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1927; Page S4.

This article mentions how Navy has not participated in a time trial yet due to the hot weather but they plan on making one shortly, as well as commenting on how they have looked so far in practice.

"Navy Plans To Row At Poughkeepsie/ Annapolis Sees No Obstacle to Entry of Crew – Will Meet Princeton." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 5, 1921; Page 22.

It is anticipated that Navy will enter another crew into the Poughkeepsie regatta next year.

"Navy Plans To Row In 2 Big Regatta/ To Enter Henley and Poughkeepsie Events – Cruise Not Likely to Interfere/ Will Also Face Princeton/ Eights to Compete on Lake Carnegie on May 2 – Syracuse and Harvard at Annapolis May 23." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 25, 1924; Page 25.

This article announces that Navy is going to enter into two big Regattas, the Henley and the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Their annual cruise will not interfere with either of them.

"Navy Prepares For Race/ Workout on Severn – Officials Seek Quarters at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1921; Page 17.

Navy begins practicing for the Regatta while their assistant coach looks for quarters in Poughkeepsie. They are expected to leave for the Hudson on June 13th.

Navy Rows 4 Miles In Fast Time Trial/ Goes Route in Less Than 20 Minutes to Satisfy Coach Bob Butler/ Three Camps Take It Easy/ Pennsylvania, California and Washington Have Comparatively Dull Day – Huskies Use Back Swing." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1926; Page 12.

This article discusses the time trail that Navy rowed today, as well as a new swing that Rusty Callow has developed for his crew to use.

"Navy Shifts Crew On Eve Of Regatta/ Illness of Broadbent and Born Forces Brewer and Freeman Into Varsity Shell/ Hardest Grind Is Over/ Easy Paddles Will Mark Remaining Workouts – Hoopie Replaces Thomson in Syracuse Boat." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1926; Page 16.

This article reveals the last minute light workouts that the crews are undergoing to prepare for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as the weather predictions for the big day.

"Navy Sinks Shell On Hidden Barrier/ Plebes Leap Into Water and Launch Rescues Them and Takes Craft Ashore/ Damage Quickly Repaired/ Only Four Other Crews Brave Rough Waters on Hudson – California Has Drill." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1928; Page 147.

This article describes how the intense rain made practice practically impossible for the day. Some crews attempted to practice in the morning, and the Navy plebes wrecked on a submerged rock. The rest of the article details their rescue.

"Navy Starts Crew Grind/ Begins Preparation for Poughkeepsie With Double Workout." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1926; Page S3.

This article announces that Navy has begun their daily workouts to prepare themselves for the Poughkeepsie.

"Navy Starts Hard Work." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 2, 1926; Page 22.

This article briefly mentions that the Navy crew teams has started practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Navy Starts Moving/ Ships Shells to Poughkeepsie Aboard a Subchaser." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1922; Page 29.

Navy has sent her shells to Poughkeepsie, and the crews themselves will soon be following them.

"Navy To Compete At Poughkeepsie/ Official Sanction Granted for Midshipmen to Row in Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 25, 1921; Page 24.

Navy will definitely be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Navy To Leave Earlier/ Crews Will Go to Camp on Hudson Tomorrow Instead of Sunday." New York TIMES, June 9, 1937; Page 36, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Navy crews will be leaving for Poughkeepsie one day earlier than scheduled. The simple reason for this is that the Middies want to have an extra day to prepare for the Regatta.

"Navy to Row at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, April 7, 1938; Page 29, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy will be sending the Varsity and the Junior Varsity to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Navy To Row On Hudson/ Varsity and Junior Varsity Crews to Compete at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, April 16, 1935; Page 29, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy will definitely be participating in the Regatta this year. The school will be entering a Varsity and Junior Varsity crew team, but not a freshman team because the plebes have to take their summer cruise.

"Navy To Send 3 Crews To Classic On Hudson/ Academy's Request to Enter Boat in Jayvee Race for First Time Sanctioned." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 8, 1928; Page 52.

This article announces that Navy will be sending three crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta, including their Jayvee crew for the first time.

"Navy Varsity Wins, California Second/ Coast Giants by a Mile Spurt Beat Cornell by Three Feet at Poughkeepsie/ Columbia Is A Sorry Last/ Finishing Behind Syracuse and Pennsylvania , Oft Victorious Eight Causes Sensation/ 100,000 See Great Contest/ Cornell Wins the Freshmen and Junior Races – Columbia Last in Both of These Also." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1921; Page 3.

Navy won this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta in a great, hard fought race, with California coming in second. The article describes in detail the great race, as well as Columbia's disappointing showing at last place. Cornell won the freshmen and junior varsity races.

"Navy Will Lend Boathouse to M.I.T. Crew To Train for the Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 14, 1929; Page 39.

This article reveals that Navy has invited M.I.T. to stay at their boathouse while they are at Poughkeepsie to train for the Regatta.

"Navy Will Send Crew to Poughkeepsie; Date Shift Allows Time for Olympic Trials." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Oct. 25, 1927; Page 34.

This article announces that Navy will be able to send a crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta in 1928 because the date of the Regatta has been moved up, so Navy will still have adequate time to prepare for the Olympic trials.

"Navy Wins." New York TIMES, June 29, 1938; Page 18, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article briefly recaps the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and Navy's big win. It also recaps Buck Walsh's accident, and how proud he was of his boys for pulling out the big win.

"Navy's Crew Coach Favors Long Course/ Glendon Says 4-Mile Contest at Poughkeepsie Will Not Prove Strain to Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 26, 1925; Page 11.

This article prints the opinion of the Navy coach that extending the varsity race of the Poughkeepsie Regatta from three miles back to 4 miles, as it was in 1916.

"Navy's Racing Shells Begin Trip To Hudson/ Midshipmen Optimistic Over Their Chances – Varsity Looks Like Old Navy Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1927; Page 12.

This article announces that the Navy crew shells have started their journey to the Hudson River. The crews themselves will arrive before the shells do, and until the equipment arrives Navy will use old shells to practice in.

"Navy's Three Undefeated Crews Reach Their Poughkeepsie Camp/ Squad, Including Four Reserves, Will Join Columbia on Hudson Today – Middies in Fine Spirits and Ready for Hard Work – Strong Wind Curtails Lion's Rowing." New York TIMES, June 11, 1937; Page 32, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the three Navy crews arrived at Poughkeepsie today. Navy is the hope of the east this year, having the distinction of arriving at the Regatta that year with all three crews undefeated. The men looked to be in good shape and they were definitely in good spirits. Columbia was the only other team on the river so far. They were able to train in the morning but high winds kept them off the river in the afternoon, much to the coach's dismay. The complete fleet of crews are all expected to arrive at the Regatta on Tuesday.

"Needs More 'Beef' In Boat/ Why Columbia Has Not Been Successful at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 16, 1913; Page S4.

This New York Times article discusses how it is believed that the reason Columbia has not been very successful at the Poughkeepsie Regatta for the past 14 years is because they always have a very light boat, where the winners usually have a heavy boat.

"New College Boat House/ Poughkeepsie Appropriates $7,000 and WPA Will Aid." New York TIMES, November 4, 1937; Page 34, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that a new boathouse will be built for the crews that come to Poughkeepsie each year for the Regatta. $7,000 has been put into the budget for the new boathouse, and the WPA will help to build it. This boathouse is in addition to the boathouse for Cornell that is currently being built.

"New Hudson Bridge Not To Hinder Race/ Committee Assured Pier Won't Interfere With the Course – More Entries Possible." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 13, 1927; Page 23.

This article reveals that the Vice President for the contracting company working on the Mid-Hudson bridge has assured the board of stewards that the construction on the bridge will not interfere with the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"New Organization To Control Rowing/ Plans to Have a Racing Week and Abolish Poughkeepsie and New London Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 3, 1914; Page 11.

This article announces that a new college rowing organization has been formed and may do away with the Poughkeepsie and the New London regattas, and may instill a week of races instead.

"New Penn 'Varsity Shows Good Form/ Again Beats Out Former First Eight – Courtney Still with the Cornell Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1916; Page S2.

This article describes the Pennsylvania crews, how they are performing, and if switching the junior varsity to varsity has been working out.

"New Poughkeepsie Race Probable." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 26, 1913; Page 12.

This New York Times article announces that there is a good chance that a new race will be added to the Poughkeepsie Regatta in which the weight limit for each rower would be 160 pounds.

"News of Athletic Activities at the Colleges/ Four Eights Rowing at Washington." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 21, 1917; Page S3.

Announces that Washington will be sending a crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta if they win their race against California and Stanford.

"Next Regatta May Be At Four Miles/ Longer Distance Favored for Varsity Boat Race if Held on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 2, 1922; Page 17.

It is widely believed that next year, if the Regatta is held at Poughkeepsie again it will return to the four mile length. Either that or it will be held at the three mile length on a different course. Many people complain that the three mile distance makes the race a mad scramble, and takes away the excitement of the crews using strategy and different techniques to out-distance each other in the longer race.

"Next Year's Contest/ Not Likely That Cornell Will Agree to a Race with Yale and Harvard Only." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1897; Page 5.

This article announces that Cornell would love to race Yale and Harvard again, but not in a race that is only exclusive to those three schools. They want an open American championship. Already Cornell has plans with Columbia and Pennsylvania to hold a race again next year, and to invite the University of Wisconsin to join them.

"No Change Likely In Regatta Course/ Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie Will Probably Be Rowed Next Year at Three Miles." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 24, 1920; Page 14.

It is likely that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held next year at three miles, although the debate is still raging. The article also gives predictions for the participants of next year's race.

"No Changes in Cornell Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 5, 1911; Page 9.

This article announces that the coach for the Cornell crew team has decided upon the boat seating for his Varsity crew. Where the men are sitting now is where they will remain until the season ends with the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"No Coaches Willing To Predict Results/ All Say That Their Crews Are Ready for the Regatta – Ebright a Bit Gloomy." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1929; Page 22.

This article reveals that all of the coaches are claiming that their crew is ready for the Regatta, but they are not willing to make any predictions about who will win the Regatta.

"No Favorite Now For Hudson Race/ Columbia, Cornell, and Penn Have Equal Chance for Rowing Honors." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1915; Page 12.

This article discusses how the crews have been looking in practice and reflects on how there is no clear cut favorite to win the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"No Navy Crew in Poughkeepsie Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Nov. 16, 1909; Page 10.

This article reveals that the Navy crew team will not be rowing at Poughkeepsie in 1910.

"No Observation Train For Ithaca/ Shortage of Cars Again Interferes with Plans of Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1920; Page 20.

There will be no observation train for the Intercollegiate Regatta at Ithaca because of a car shortage. Officials are assuring everyone, however, that there will be plenty of seating available for all of the spectators.

"No Rowing At Wisconsin/ Athletic Council Dashes Hopes for Revival of Crew Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 23, 1917; Page 14.

The athletic council of Wisconsin refused to consider bringing rowing back as a sport so they will not be participating in next year's Poughkeepsie Regatta as hoped.

"No Sculling Races at Poughkeepsie/ Quadruple Fours Eliminated from Intercollegiate Regatta/ Oarsmen On The Water/ Crews Leave Tanks for Actual Work in the Boats – Poor Outlook in Certain Quarters." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 4, 1906; Page 10.

This article announces that the Quadruple Fours will be eliminated from the Poughkeepsie Regatta, due to lack of participants.

Noble, Hollister., "Spartan Days For The College Crews/ Oarsmen Undergo Months of Rigorous Training in Hope of a Moment of Glory in June." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 10, 1925; Page SM17.

This article discusses the art of rowing. It talks about the big rowing races that take place at the end of the year, the history of rowing, what it's like to a member of the crew team practicing and then making the grueling drive to the finish line and what's it like to watch the event. It's a good article that briefly covers all aspects of rowing.

"Notes of the Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, January 5, 1908; Page S3.

The rumor that a single sculls event might be added to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year has been officially denied, and it is also reported that West Point is considering putting together a rowing team for the express purpose of racing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Notes on College Athletics." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, January 12, 1902; Page 11.

This article briefly mentions that the University of Pennsylvania will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta that year.

"Oarsmen At Poughkeepsie/ Columbia Crews Arrive from New York – Boats Towed by the Launch." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1901; Page 5.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived at Poughkeepsie to begin training for the Regatta.

"Oarsmen At Poughkeepsie/ Only the Wisconsins Tried to Do Any Rowing Yesterday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1900; Page 1.

Wisconsin was the only school to attempt practice the other day in the Hudson's rough water. The other crews spent the day doing various activities.

"Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie/ Pennsylvania Crews the First to Open Quarters on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1902; Page 10.

This article announces that Pennsylvania has arrived at Poughkeepsie to begin practice. They are the first to arrive.

"Oarsmen Evacuate Scene of Regatta/ Several Members of Victorious Washington Crew to Take Trip Abroad." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1923; Page 9.

After another thrilling Poughkeepsie Regatta, most of the crews left the Hudson River and headed back home. Many of the victorious Washington crew headed to New York City to do a little sightseeing before they headed back west.

"Oarsmen Jump Overboard/ U. of P. Freshmen Ordered Out to Save Shell from Breaking/ Quaker Varsity Crew Shows Up Well in Rough Water at Poughkeepsie – Three Four-Oared Boats Out." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1903; Page 3.

This article reveals that during practice today the water was extremely rough, and four members of the Freshmen Eight had to jump out of the boat and swim to shore to avoid the Freshmen shell from breaking with all the extra water that they took on. The Varsity Eight, however, barely took on any extra water due to superior rowing, and were able to make it back to the boathouse.

"Oarsmen On Edge For Hudson Races/ Columbia Rules a Slight Favorite in 'Varsity Event, with Syracuse the Dark Horse." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1915; Page S2.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta, who the favorite is, who the dark horse is, and how the other crews are expected to do.

"Oarsmen On Hudson Favored By Weather/ Rice Pleased After Penn's Trial Against Tide – Two Eight-Mile Workouts for Columbia." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1924; Page 22.

This article reports that the weather has so far been kind to the crews that are practicing on the Hudson, and it describes what their practice routines were.

"Oarsmen On The Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1903; Page 10.

This article reveals that all of the crews participating in the Regatta have been putting in a lot of practice time to prepare for the big race.

"Oarsmen Present Plea/ Princeton Council to Decide on Poughkeepsie Race Entry." New York TIMES, January 7, 1939; Page 11, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Princeton crew members have petitioned to race in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and the university council on athletics will decide within the month whether Princeton will be allowed to row in Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Observation Train Refused For Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 22, 1920; Page 20.

There may not be an observation train at the Poughkeepsie Regatta for the first time ever, due to the shortage of railroad cars.

"Officials for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 27, 1905; Page 6.

Lists who the officials will be for this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta and at what time each of the races will be held.

"Olympic Champions Arrive On Hudson/ Middies Bring Shell in Which They Rowed to Title-Rain Prevents Workout." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun 12, 1921; Page 92.

Navy and their equipment arrived on the Hudson late in the afternoon, but were prevented from practicing due to a storm that blew up. California was the only crew that made it on the water today.

"Only 4 Colleges Likely to Send Crews for All Races on Hudson/ Survey shows Columbia, Cornell, Syracuse and Navy May Have Full Complements at Poughkeepsie – Penn, Which Voted for Renewal of Regatta, Doubtful Participant." New York TIMES, January 26, 1934; Page 22, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reveals that although the college community is very happy at the return of the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, only four colleges will be sending a full set of three crews to the Regatta. Those colleges that will be participating in all races are Columbia, Cornell, Syracuse, and Navy. All other colleges are expected to send only one or two crews, and some may not be able to participate at all, such as MIT and Manhattan. The reason for the smaller amount of participants is that the economic situation in the country is still not great, and many colleges worry about having enough funds to send their crews to Poughkeepsie.

"Only One Workout For Columbia Crew/ High Winds Prevent Morning Drill – Freshmen Eight Suffers a Shake-Up." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1923; Page S4.

Some rough weather prevented Columbia from going on the Hudson to practice until this afternoon.

"Only Three Colleges Definitely Committed To Participation in Poughkeepsie Regatta." New York TIMES, January 10, 1933; Page 29, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that so far, only three colleges were committed to going to the Poughkeepsie Regatta that year, and not even all of them were 100% assurances. Even Cornell, one of the founders of the Poughkeepsie Regatta was not going to be able to send a crew team down to the Regatta this year. Mr. Stevenson, however, is still confident that the Regatta will be held. There may be changes to it, for instance it might be held earlier in the year, or the races may be shorter, but he is positive that the Regatta will run as usual.

"Penn Crew Looms As A Dark House/ Considered Strong Contender for Poughkeepsie Race – Gives Rice Confidence Vote/ Navy in Two-Mile Spin/ Glendon Satisfied With His Crew – Washington Has Easy Day – Columbia Works Hard." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1925; Page 8.

This article reveals what all the crews on the Hudson did for last minute practices before the Regatta.

"Penn Crew Chosen For Varsity Race/ Coach Wright Decides to Start Lighter Eight in Big Event at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1921; Page 19.

The Pennsylvania coach finally decided that the light crew will be rowing in the varsity race. It was also a nice day for practice so all the crews were out on the water.

"Penn Crews, First to Arrive, Take Six-Mile Row on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1924; Page 14.

This article describes the Pennsylvania crew's first practice on the Hudson in preparation for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Penn Crews Join Rivals at Ithaca/ Absence of One Oarsman Keeps 'Varsity Idle – Columbia, Cornell, and Syracuse Out." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1920; Page 12.

Pennsylvania arrived in Ithaca today to join Columbia, Cornell, and Syracuse on Cayuga Lake.

"Penn Crews On Hudson/ Columbia Oarsmen Cheer Newcomers as They Row Up River." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1915; Page 9.

This article briefly describes the first practice the Pennsylvania crews had on the Hudson.

"Penn Crews On Hudson/ Quaker Oarsmen Not to Drop Out of Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 9, 1915; Page 13.

This article announces that despite rumors to the contrary, Pennsylvania will be at the Poughkeepsie Regatta next year.

"Penn Crews Reach Scene Of Regatta/ Quakers Join Columbia and Syracuse at Poughkeepsie – Row on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1923; Page 9.

Pennsylvania arrived in Poughkeepsie late this afternoon and joined Columbia and Syracuse on the Hudson practicing.

"Penn Crews Will Move Wednesday/ Red and Blue Eights to Begin Training on Hudson for the Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Page 30.

Next Wednesday Pennsylvania will be leaving for the Hudson to begin practice there. The lineups for all the participating crews are also discussed.

"Penn Cub Crew Rewarded/ Gets Permission to Take Part in Regatta at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, May 30, 1934; Page 23, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt, Hyde Park, New York.

The Pennsylvania freshmen crew will be joining the varsity at Poughkeepsie this year. The freshmen will be able to attend because they raised the funds themselves to go, as well as a reward for defeating Harvard and Navy in the American Henley. The freshmen will not be traveling down with the varsity however; they will wait until the end of final examinations, and then travel down to Poughkeepsie for the 14th of June.

"Penn Favors Standing Pat/ Steward Brown Suggests Taking Yale-Harvard Train to Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 9, 1921; Page 21.

Pennsylvania will continue to be a member of the intercollegiate regatta, and are in favor of staying in Poughkeepsie, even with the possibility of no observation train.

"Penn Is Lone Crew To Row On Hudson/ Rice Sends Oarsmen for a Short Paddle, While Other Eights Have Easy Day/ Rigging Raised For Kerns/ Change Necessitated In Washington Shell Because Luft's Substitute Is 6 Feet 5 Inches Tall." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1924; Page 11.

This article details the practice that Pennsylvania, the only crew to go out on the Hudson, undertook. It also predicts the chances of Washington, which the author believes are greatly improved because of the hot weather that has arrived. It also describes the schedules of additional trains that have been ordered for the race, as well as steamers.

"Penn Joins in Protest/ Coach Ward Objects to Course for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 16, 1906; Page 7.

This article announces that the head coach of Pennsylvania objects to the location of the regatta in Poughkeepsie. Apparently there is very rough water and eddies near the bridge. The manager of the Poughkeepsie Highland Rowing Association claims that the eddy is only because construction is being done on the bridge; however he says that if the eddy negatively affects any one team, they will move the course. Most of the teams were on the river practicing and it was perfect weather for it. Georgetown arrived today and they are expected to be on the river tomorrow.

"Penn Junior Crew Becomes 'Varsity/ Coach Wright Promotes Second Eight When It Beats First by Five Lengths." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1916; Page 13.

This article reveals that, due to the junior varsity defeating the varsity squad more than once in practice, the junior varsity has been promoted to the varsity for the Regatta.

"Penn Junior Crew Gets Varsity Post/ Doyle's Eight Beats Irmiger's by Six Lengths In Time Trial and Becomes Senior Boat/ Mallory Is Taken Ill/ No. 4 In Winning Shell Removed to Hospital – Syracuse Oarsmen Arrive on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1925; Page 16.

This article announces that the Pennsylvania Junior Varsity crew will be racing in the Varsity race at the Poughkeepsie Regatta because they defeated the former Penn varsity crew in a time trial. It also briefly discusses the goings on of the other schools that are on the river.

"Penn Loses Stroke Of Freshmen Crew/ Mattison Taken Out of Boat When His Eligibility Is Questioned by Ten Eyck." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1921; Page 15.

Pennsylvania's stroke has been removed because Coach Ten Eyck has questioned his eligibility because he went to Syracuse for one year. Consequently the Pennsylvania Coach removed the student from his lineup.

"Penn Next On Hudson/ Syracuse, Wisconsin, and Washington Crews Will Arrive This Week." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1914; Page 9.

This article announces that Pennsylvania will be arriving on the Hudson tomorrow, and that Syracuse, Wisconsin, and Washington will arrive later in the week.

"Penn Rowing Squad Arrives On Hudson/ Locates in Highland Week Ahead of Schedule and Is Expected to Go on River Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1929; Page 27.

This article announces that Pennsylvania has arrived on the Hudson to begin training for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Penn Rows 4 Miles Under 20 Minutes/ Better Time Than in Last Test Laid to Conditions – Spuhn Working Men Easily/ Columbia Cubs Shuffled/ Ten Eyck Trying for More Speed – Washington Coach Says Best He Hopes For Is Fourth." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1927; Page 23.

This article discusses the time trial that Pennsylvania undertook, as well as changes that the Columbia coach has made in his Freshmen boat. It also gives a brief description of how Washington has been looking in practice, and what coach Rusty Callow thinks of his crews' chances.

"Penn Rows Time Trial/ Quakers Paced by Freshmen and Juniors in Poughkeepsie Test." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1914; Page 6.

This article describes the practices of Pennsylvania and Washington as well as briefly giving news updates on the other participating crews.

"Penn Tests New Shell/ Quaker Oarsmen Take Initial Spin Over Poughkeepsie Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1916; Page S2.

This article announces that Pennsylvania has arrived on the Hudson and describes their first activities.

"Penn To Compete At Poughkeepsie/ Oarsmen Will Raise Funds and Row in the Championship Regatta in June." New York TIMES, March 20, 1935; Page 29, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Penn will be entering one or more crews in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Penn To Stay In Race/ Decides Definitely to Hold Place In Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 10, 1921; Page 15.

Pennsylvania will definitely be staying in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Penn Varsity Boat Draws No. 2 Lane/ Quaker Eight Will Hold 'Rabbit's Foot' Position in the Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 14, 1923; Page 16.

Pennsylvania has drawn the supposedly lucky lane for the varsity race of the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The lanes that all colleges drew for all races are also listed.

"Penn Varsity Not to Row at Poughkeepsie; Crew Will Forego Long Distance Racing." New York TIMES, February 21, 1937; Section 5, Page 1, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Pennsylvania's Varsity crew will not be racing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. Pennsylvania has been handicapped from preparing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta by not having any area to practice distance rowing. Therefore, until they are able to find a way to practice adequately for distance rowing, they will not be participating in the yearly Regatta. Pennsylvania will, however, continue to be a member of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association.

"Penn Varsity to Row In Regatta on Hudson." New York TIMES, May 25, 1934; Page 28, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces officially that Penn will be able to enter their varsity into the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. The Jayvee and freshmen squads will be unable to attend because of financial reasons. The only reason the varsity are able to go is because the undergraduates held a dance at the school, the proceeds of which went to sending their crew to the Regatta.

"Penn Wants Regatta Open." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, February 8, 1901; Page 7.

This article briefly discusses how Cornell wants to keep the Poughkeepsie Regatta exclusive, but Penn wants to open it up to all schools who have a crew team. Penn is anxious to meet all qualified schools on the river to have a true test of who is best.

"Penn Won't Sanction Date/ June 17 Not Acceptable for Intercollegiate Regatta on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 11, 1916; Page 12.

This article announces that Pennsylvania is refusing to have the Poughkeepsie Regatta on June 17th due to final exams, so another date must be decided upon.

"Penn Would Forego Poughkeepsie Regatta Rather Than Drop Other Races on Schedule." New York TIMES, January 19, 1934; Page 26, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that if the financial situation makes it necessary, Penn would decline going to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, rather than cutting some crew teams during the regular season. This decision insured that as many people would be able to participate in the rowing program at Penn this year. The article also mentions Maxwell Stevenson's (chairman of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association) announcement that at the next board of stewards meeting it would be determined if the Regatta would be held this year, and when. The outlook is favorable, however, because Navy, Columbia, Cornell, Washington, and California have all agreed to come to the Regatta this year.

"Penn's Junior Boat Quits/ Coach Nickalls Chooses Winning Crew to Race in Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1915; Page S2.

This article announces that Pennsylvania has chosen the crew that will represent them in the varsity race of the Regatta. It also gives a brief mention of the activities of the Stanford crews.

"Penn's Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1904; Page 7.

This article announces that the Pennsylvania rowing crew arrived on the Hudson to begin practice for the Regatta.

"Penn's Rowing Shake-Up/ Quakers Conclude They Have No Show at Poughkeepsie in Big Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1901; Page 9.

Pennsylvania does not believe that they have a chance at winning the Varsity eight race at Poughkeepsie, so they will only enter crews into the four-oared and the freshmen eight races.

"Penn's Time Trial Fair/ Rowing Steward Upholds Courtney's Junior Eligibility Contention." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1915; Page 9.

This article briefly reports on Pennsylvania's time trial the other day, and comments on the stewards' reaction to the new junior varsity eligibility rule.

"Penn's 'Varsity Four Won/ Philadelphia Crew Established a Record for the Poughkeepsie Course – Columbia Was Second." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 3, 1900; Page 8.

This article announces that Pennsylvania won the postponed varsity four-oared race yesterday, and Columbia came in second. It also gives a detailed account of how the race unfolded.

"Penn's Victorious 'Varsity Eight/ Wisconsin Was Second, Cornell Third, and Columbia Fourth/ Western Freshmen Won/ A Great Contest Between Pennsylvania and Wisconsin in the Main Race – Both Crews Led at Intervals." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 1, 1900; Page 9.

Pennsylvania won the Poughkeepsie Regatta after a brilliant display and a very hard struggle against great crews. A detailed report of the race is given, as well as evaluations on how the other crews rowed. Wisconsin won the Freshmen race, and an in-depth account of that race is given as well.

"Pennsy Crews On Hudson/ Heavy Rain in Afternoon Retards Work of Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1908; Page 7.

This article discusses how Pennsylvania has arrived on the Hudson to begin practicing, as well as how practice has been going for the teams that are already there.

"Pennsylvania Boat Wrecks Wisconsin/ Quaker Four, Rowing Time Trial, Crashes Into Westerners Crossing Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1913; Page 8.

This article from the New York Times reveals that Pennsylvania accidentally crashed into the Wisconsin four oared boat, wrecking the shell. The Pennsylvania coach immediately offered Wisconsin the use of one of their four-oared shells to use in the race.

"Pennsylvania Crew Fast/ Courtney Says It Broke Course Record in Time Trial at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1911; Page C5.

This article discusses Pennsylvania's impressive time trial and the expectations the coaches have for the upcoming race.

"Pennsylvania Crew Fastest In Trials/ But Cornell Rows Well Against the Wind and Slack Tide at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1914; Page 8.

This article goes over the results of the time trials that were held today on the Hudson.

"Pennsylvania Wins At Poughkeepsie/ First in Intercollegiate Boat Race, with Wisconsin Second/ Cornell Next; Columbia Last/ Wisconsin, Leading Almost to the Finish, Loses by Bad Steering." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1899; Page 1.

This article announces that Pennsylvania won the Varsity race, and it gives a very detailed description of the entire race for the crews as well as for the spectators.

"Pennsylvanians Very Confident/ They Are in Fine Form and Will Row Their Best." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1896; Page 1.

This article talks about the Pennsylvania crew and their confidence in their ability to win the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Pennsylvania's 'Varsity Race/ She Defeats Cornell, Wisconsin, and Columbia at Saratoga/ Cornell Freshmen Victors/ They Leave Their Columbia and Pennsylvania Rivals Way Behind/ Pennsylvania Establishes a New Record for Three Miles, Rowing in 15:51 1-2." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 3, 1898; Page 10.

This article announces that Pennsylvania won the 'Varsity race at Saratoga, and Cornell won the freshmen race. A detailed description of each race is given.

"Picking Regatta Winner Hard Task/ Courtney Says Crews Are Well Matched, but His Oarsmen Are Favorites." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1914; Page S1.

This article talks about all the crews participating in the Regatta. Every crew is felt to have some strength, and they are all closely matched. Cornell is felt to be the favorite, however, and Coach Courtney agrees.

"Plan Poughkeepsie Race/ Regatta Will Be Resumed Next Year, Mr. Mapes Announces." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 2, 1919; Page 12.

Next year the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be resumed.

"Plan Regatta Revival/ Columbia Moves to Bring About Return of Poughkeepsie Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Oct. 12, 1919; Page 102.

Columbia is very much in favor of reinstating the Poughkeepsie Regatta next year and is doing everything they can to ensure that it happens.

"Plan to Use Radio Telephones For Bulletins at Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1922; Page 15.

It is most likely that a radio telephone will be used for the first time at the Poughkeepsie Regatta to send bulletins of the race to the spectators on the shore.

"Plans Of College Oarsmen/ Intercollegiate Rowing Association Will Hold Its Annual Regatta on the Hudson June 26." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1899; Page A8.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the dates it will be held on, and how past regattas were run, including describing the course, the observation train, and how people could get to the Regatta.

"Plans Under Way to Resume Poughkeepsie Rowing in 1934." New York TIMES, April 27, 1933; Page 21, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that although the Poughkeepsie Regatta was cancelled this year because of financial problems across the country, next year the Regatta will be held, no matter what the circumstances.

"Plug-Felder Back With Penn Varsity/ Veteran Coxswain Answers Coach's Plea When Judd Is Called Away/ Will Hold Ropes Today/ Was Unable to Go on Hudson Because of Business Offer – Emerson Strokes Cornell Again."

This article discusses how the Pennsylvania coach will fill the whole that his coxswain left when he had to leave the crew.

"Point For Hudson Races/ Penn Oarsmen Begin Training for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1922; Page 23.

The Pennsylvania crews have begun training for the Poughkeepsie Regatta on their own Schuylkill River.

"Policing the Poughkeepsie Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1900; Page 5.

This article lists the new rules that have been created to regulate the boats that will be on the river watching the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Poll Casts Doubt Over Crew Classic/ Only Cornell and Syracuse Favor Change to June 6 and Shift From Hudson/ M.I.T. And Navy Opposed/ Examinations Likely to Keep Other Past Contestants Out of Big Regatta." New York TIMES, May 5, 1942; Page 25, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that although it has been determined that if the Regatta is to be held it will be held at Lake Onondaga on June 6th, there is no guarantee that the Regatta will be held at all. Cornell and Syracuse are the only two schools that are completely in favor of the switch. Most of the other schools announced they would be unable to attend because the early date conflicted with their school's final exams.

"Poughkeepsie Crew Races On June 17/ Pennsylvania Agrees to Accept Early Date Rather Than Row Regatta at Ithaca/ Later Dates Unsuitable/ New York Central to Again Run Observation Trains While Races are Being Rowed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 18, 1916; Page 13.

This article announces that after much deliberation is has been decided that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on the Hudson River on June 17th and explains why.

"Poughkeepsie Draws Naval Plebe Entry/ Crew to Row for First Time in This Regatta and in Henleys at Philadelphia." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 11, 1927; Page 23.

This article reveals that the Navy freshmen, or Plebe, crew will for the first time row in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Poughkeepsie Loses the Regatta To Marietta; Ohio, After 55 Years." New York TIMES, March 25, 1950; Page 1, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Board of Stewards for the Intercollegiate Rowing Association has decided to move their annual Regatta to Marietta, Ohio. For 55 years the Regatta was held at Poughkeepsie on the Hudson River, but all that tradition could not beat the offer that Marietta held. There are no tides on the Ohio River, and there will be an observation train, two things that the Hudson River cannot give the IRA. In addition, Marietta is going to raise $15,000 - $20,000 for the Regatta, the rowers will be housed at the local college, and new boathouse facilities will be built. It is doubtful that the Regatta will ever return to Poughkeepsie.

"Poughkeepsie Race Is Back At 4 Miles/ Intercollegiate Rowing Body Votes to Return to Longer Distance on June 22/ Change Comes As Surprise/ Cornell Alone Opposes Action – Stevenson Again Heads the Board of Stewards. ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 23, 1925; Page 15.

This article reveals that the Poughkeepsie Regatta Varsity race has been changed back to four miles. The article gives a history of why the race changed to two and three miles, and why it has changed back to four, as well as if the change in length will have any effect on who enters the Regatta.

"Poughkeepsie Race Is Set For June 28/ Intercollegiate Regatta to Be Rowed Then if Tide Reports Are Favorable/ 11 Invited To Send Crews/ Bids Sent to California, Stanford and Princeton Among Others for Big Four-Mile Brush." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 15, 1926; Page 24.

This article reveals the date of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, which will only be changed if the tides prove to be unfavorable. It also reveals that eleven colleges have been invited to the Regatta, as well as which ones are likely to enter and not enter.

"Poughkeepsie Race May Be On June 22/ This Date Likely to Be Chosen at Meeting of the Regatta Stewards Here Jan. 22/ Record Field Is Expected/ Seven Crews Probably Will Start – Columbia and Penn Announce Rowing Schedules." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 15, 1925; Page 17.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on June 22 at the three mile distance. There has been some discussion on bringing the race back to four miles, but that will not be happening this year. In addition, crews that are definitely participating are mentioned.

"Poughkeepsie Race Shifted To Ithaca/ Lack of Observation Train Forces Change of Hudson River Classic to Cayuga Lake/ Will Be Rowed On June 19/ 'Varsity Distance Reduced to Two Miles – Four Crews Entered and Navy Has Been Invited." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1920; Page 23.

Due mainly to there being no observation train available this year, as well as the tidal conditions making impossible race dates for some schools, this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held in Ithaca on Cayuga Lake.

"Poughkeepsie Race To Be Rowed July 1/ Stewards Agree on Later Date for Revival of Big Regatta – Invitations Issued." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 29, 1920; Page 11.

The Poughkeepsie Regatta will be rowed on July 1st, a very late start. Invitations have been sent out and the varsity race will still be three miles long, as it was going to be in 1917 before the U.S. entered the war.

"Poughkeepsie Race To Be Three Miles/ Intercollegiate Regatta Stewards Reduce Distance of 'Varsity Event." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 31, 1917; Page 8.

The Board of Stewards have shortened the Poughkeepsie Regatta from four to three miles, and there have been other small changes to the rules that are also listed.

"Poughkeepsie Races All Won By Cornell/ Columbia Second in Four-Oared and Third in 'Varsity Eight-Oared/ Wisconsin Is A Surprise/ Westerners Second In Two Races – Syracuse, Like Columbia, Disappointing – Ithacans' Victories Easy." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1912; Page C7.

This article reveals that Cornell swept the Poughkeepsie Regatta and won all three races. Descriptions of each of the races are given, as well as the atmosphere and attendance of the spectators.

"The Poughkeepsie Races/ Wisconsin Crew the Only One on the Water Yesterday/ Yachting Parties Arriving/ Preparations for To-Day's Contests Completed – Tactics of the College Oarsmen Studied." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1899; Page 2.

This article describes Wisconsin's practice that they held on Sunday, normally a day of rest. It also talks about the first race that is scheduled to happen tomorrow. The history of the course and of the Regatta is given, as well as expectations of how the crews will perform.

"Poughkeepsie Racing Plans." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1903; Page 6.

This article announces that all the final plans for the Poughkeepsie Regatta have been made, the times are set and the observation train is secured.

"Poughkeepsie Raises $3,000 For Regatta/ W. H. Frank Sr. Is Re-elected Chairman – Old System of Signaling Will Be Restored." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 7, 1924; Page 11.

This article reveals that the Poughkeepsie Committee has raised $3,000 for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and that the old system of using flags and bombs to signify the winner will be continued this year.

"Poughkeepsie Regatta June 25." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, January 19, 1910; Page 7.

This article announces that this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on June 25th, and the races will begin at 4:30.

"Poughkeepsie Regatta Listed for June 22; Winner of Marietta Event Will Be Invited." New York TIMES, January 22, 1936; Page 22, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year will be held on June 22nd. It was decided to invite the winner of the Marietta Regatta to the Poughkeepsie Regatta as well, to try to encourage interest in rowing in the Midwestern states. The article notes that there is heightened anticipation this year because it is an Olympic year. And the Regatta date was chosen carefully so the crews participating in the Olympic time-trials would have sufficient time to rest.

"Poughkeepsie Regatta Officials to Confer Today on Possible Change in Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 12, 1927; Page 31.

This article announces that the Regatta officials are discussing possibly picking a new course on the Hudson for the Regatta due to construction on the Mid-Hudson bridge.

"Poughkeepsie Regatta Plans/ University of Toronto May Enter a Crew for 'Varsity Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, March 26, 1904; Page 6.

If the University of Toronto does not send a crew to the Henley Regatta this year they will be sending a crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Meanwhile the committee will continue to encourage schools to have a crew competition every year on the Poughkeepsie course. Finally all of the colleges that will definitely be participating in this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta are listed.

"Poughkeepsie Regatta Programme." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 10, 1902; Page 6.

This article announces that the Board of Stewards met and determined what the program of the Poughkeepsie Regatta would be that year. The article lists what times each of the three races, varsity, junior varsity, and freshmen, will be held, as well as which colleges will be racing in each race.

"The Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Rules Approved by the Secretary of the Treasury for Policing the Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 17, 1899; Page 4.

This letter announces that the board of stewards came to the decision that the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year will be held on June 26th and 27th on the west bank of the river. The rules for boats that are observing the race from the river are listed as well. Some of the rules cover where these boats can dock, how fast they can run, and where they can and cannot go. Finally the referee's for the race are listed as well.

"The Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Stanford University Will Probably Send a Shell Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 19, 1912; Page X7.

This article reconfirms that Stanford plans on sending a crew to this years Poughkeepsie Regatta, which will be held on June 29th. They have also been assured that they will have a new boat waiting for them when they arrive on the Hudson. This ended concerns that they would have to row in a borrowed boat. Stanford plans on arriving on the Hudson on June 14th, thus giving them enough time to practice for the big event.

"Poughkeepsie Rowing Course Changed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1899; Page 5.

This article announces that the location of the Poughkeepsie Regatta has been changed from the west side of the river, to the middle of the river, and explains why.

"Poughkeepsie Stewards Keep Race for Jayvee." New York TIMES, June 9, 1937; Page 36, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that despite the fact that Syracuse pulled out of the Jayvee race, leaving only three contenders, they were still going to hold the race. The Board of Stewards announced that as long as there was more than one boat in the race, the race would be held, however there was no concern of another boat pulling out of the race.

"The Poughkeepsie Test." New York TIMES, July 6, 1940; Page 12, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article is a letter to the editor from a reader. He comments that his only regret in this past year's Poughkeepsie Regatta is that the oarsmen had to wait so long before they were able to row. He wonders why the officials just did not schedule the Regatta for the morning, when the conditions were better. He also comments that the attention should be given to the men and how well and hard they rowed, and not on the conditions and the time delay, over which the crews had no control.

"Practice at Poughkeepsie/ Leland Stanford Crews Take Two Spins on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1915; Page 7.

This article gives a brief description of the activities of the crews this Sunday.

"Praise For Freshmen/ Rowing Coaches Say Cornell Cub Crew Should Try for Olympics." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1920; Page 23.

The coaches for Columbia and Pennsylvania had high praises for the Cornell freshmen crew, and expressed their wish to see the crew team try out for the Olympics.

"Pride Was Stroke Oar." New York TIMES, June 19, 1939; Page 19, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that there was a mistake in the official boating order for Navy. Francis Cuccias was listed as having stroked the Navy Varsity, but it was actually Bailey Pride who sat in that seat for the race.

"Princeton Crews Enter Poughkeepsie Regatta." New York TIMES, March 2, 1947; Section 5, Page 5, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announced that Princeton has been invited to attend the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and they accepted the invitation. They will definitely be sending a Varsity and a freshmen crew, and they will try to find the necessary funds to send their Junior Varsity crew as well.

"Princeton Crews In Hudson Regatta/ Three Tiger Eights Entered in Poughkeepsie Event - $6,000 Fund Raised." New York TIMES, April 3, 1940; Page 29, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announced that Princeton will be joining the Poughkeepsie Regatta for the first time ever. The crew program received permission from the school to join the Regatta provided they could overcome any difficulties encountered on their own. The two main problems encountered was a scheduling conflict, which was resolved when Princeton's academic schedule moved up, and money, and the crew teams raised enough money through a fundraiser that had been going on since April.

"Princeton May Row On Hudson Next Year/ Gets Permission to Compete – Cost Is a Problem." New York TIMES, April 15, 1939; Page 13, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Princeton received permission from the council of athletics to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta for an experimental three year period. There are still some obstacles for the Tigers however. One of the obstacles is cost, and the other is that their final exams fall so late in the month of June. Their academic calendar is being re-arranged, however, which moves the finals up a week and may fix that problem.

"Program of the Regatta and Positions of the Crews." New York TIMES, June 26, 1930; Page 19, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article gives what positions all the crews for all three races will be racing in, as well as what times the races will be held.

"Quaker Crew On Hudson/ Pennsylvania's First to Arrive at Poughkeepsie Quarters/ All the Oarsmen Take a Short Spin on the River – 'Varsity and Freshmen Positions." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1903; Page 2.

This article announces that the University of Pennsylvania has arrived on the river to begin practicing for the Regatta, and they are the first to arrive this year. The remainder of the article discusses the Quaker teams and how they have been doing this year.

" 'Rabbit's Foot' Lane To Columbia/ Blind Draw for Positions at Poughkeepsie Favors Blue and White Oarsmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1922; Page 16.

Columbia University got luck of the draw and drew the best lane for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, although it is considered the best lane only because of the number of winning crews that have rowed there, and not because of any actual superiority.

"Race Agreement Signed/ Time When the Event Takes Place May Determine the Result." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1897; Page 3.

This article announces that an agreement has been signed saying when the Varsity Regatta will be rowed, and in what direction it will be rowed.

"Race Will Test Strokes/ Oarsmen Look On Poughkeepsie Regatta As Ten Eyck – Courtney Contest." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 18, 1905; Page 10.

This article discusses how this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta is looked upon as a contest between the different stroke methods taught by the coaches of Ithaca and Syracuse. The coaches are Courtney and Ten Eyck respectively. Courtney has a slower style of stroke while Ten Eyck has a rougher and faster philosophy. The crowd feels that whichever team is the winner will be a testimony as to which style is better.

"Racing Schedule for Regatta At Poughkeepsie on June 26." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1922; Page 29.

The schedule for the races is posted here. The freshmen race will kick things off at 4:30 p.m. and the varsity race will start at 6:30 p.m.

"Rainsoaked Throng Shows High Spirit/ Enthusiasm Not Dampened by Downfall, Though Spectacle Is Rather Drab/ Thousands Kept Away/ But Rooters Cheer as Ardently as in Past – Spectator Fleet Shrinks in Size." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1928; Page 27.

This article announces that despite the driving rain there was still a huge crowd at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The observation train was full, the town was gaily decorated, and the crowds cheered just as loudly as if the sun was shining.

Rand, John R., "On Behalf Of The East/ Reader Suggests Shortening the Poughkeepsie Crew Course." New York TIMES, June 28, 1941; Page 19, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article was written by a reader of the New York TIMES. He talks about how the Poughkeepsie Regatta is losing fans and national interest because the Western crews have dominated and won the Regatta 12 times out of the last 18 years. He feels there are many reasons for this, not the least of which is that the Western crews have a longer period to prepare for the Regatta because of the warmer climate. He still believes that the Western crews are a crucial part of the Regatta, and instead of eliminating them, he thinks that the race should be shortened from four miles to two miles.

"Ready For Word 'GO!'/ 'Varsity Crews at Poughkeepsie Anxious To Hear It/ University of Pennsylvania's Eight the Favorite – The Quakers Feel that They Have Only Cornell to Beat to Gain the Victory – Harvard's Men Make a Poor Showing in Their Last Day's Practice on the Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1896; Page 1.

Discusses the upcoming Poughkeepsie Regatta, the fans that are coming to watch, who the favorite is considered to be, how each crew feels they will perform, the morale of the crews, and last minute activities and changes.

"Regatta Calls for Cruise Up Hudson." New York TIMES, June 19, 1938; Sec. 5, Page 5, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses what it's like for those people who bring yachts up to the Poughkeepsie Regatta to sail and stay there. Poughkeepsie does not have as many yachts and boats show up as the Regatta down in New London does, but there is still a large amount. The Hudson cannot be beaten when it comes to scenery and beauty, however there are not as many coves to anchor in, and if forced to anchor on the side of the river yachts are often knocked about by the wash of the river steamers that are constantly going up and down the river. Despite this inconvenience, however, the Hudson is still a breathtaking place to sail, and many find the lost night or two of sleep is well worth the excitement of watching the Regatta at Poughkeepsie.

"Regatta Chief To Resign/ Troy, Chairman 24 Years, to Quit After Poughkeepsie Races." New York TIMES, May 17, 1940; Page 24, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Peter H. Troy, the Chairman of the Poughkeepsie Regatta for the past 24 years will retire from his position following the races at Poughkeepsie this year. He did not give any reason for his retirement.

"Regatta Controversy/Cornell's Position with Reference to the Poughkeepsie Event." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, February 13, 1897; Page 4.

Cornell expects and hopes that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will become a yearly occurrence. Cornell, Pennsylvania, and Columbia are waiting to hear Harvard's position on the matter.

"Regatta Course to be Cleared." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1900; Page 19.

This article announces that new rules are going to be made to regulate the spectator boats on the Hudson during the Regatta in order to keep the course clear for the crews just prior to and during the race.

"Regatta Crowds Arriving/ Crews Rest for Tomorrow's Races – Columbia Subs Defeat Syracuse." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1915; Page 19.

This article briefly mentions the Regatta crowds that are arriving, as well as giving a very brief description of the substitute race that was held.

"Regatta Date Hard To Pick/ Stewards Unable to Choose Day for Poughkeepsie Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 15, 1916; Page 11.

This article discusses the difficulty the stewards are having in selecting a date for the Regatta. The three possible dates they have picked all conflict with someone's schedule, however the race cannot be held on any but those three dates due to the tidal conditions.

"Regatta June 17 at Poughkeepsie/Intercollegiate Rowing Races Set for Two Days Before the Yale-Harvard Classic/Rule on Launches Made/Crew is Liable to Disqualification if It's Coach's Boat Goes Outside of Position," New York TIMES, January 23, 1931; Page 19, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the date the Board of Stewards chose for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and how it is the earliest date that the modern Regatta has ever been held at. The date will be official after it is approved by the Poughkeepsie committee, the Coast Guard, and the New York Central Railroad. All colleges who were invited last year were invited back again, including Princeton, who did not participate this year, but it is believed that they will enter a freshman team this year. The Board of Stewards also adopted a new rule that will be put in place this year, stating that if a coach's launch goes outside of the designated area, which is behind the referee's boat and to the east of all the crews, their crew team will be disqualified. This rule occurred because the coach's disregard the rule to stay in their area, and go up the river pacing their own crew teams, and hampering any teams they pass with their backwash. Last year the Navy crew team was swamped because of a circumstance such as this. Also, the rule that was implemented last year concerning when a restart would be appropriate will continue to be observed.

"Regatta May Be On June 17/ New York Central Refuses to Run Observation Trains on Later Dates." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 24, 1916; Page 10.

This article discusses how the date of the Regatta may be changed to June 17th in order to accommodate the observation train. The railroad authorities believe it would not be possible to have a train running for the June 24th race because of the heavy traffic in and out of New York City for the 4th of July.

"Regatta Of The Colleges/ Cornell Wants a Three-Mile Course – Saratoga Preferred to Poughkeepsie – Wisconsin Will Enter." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 9, 1898; Page 10.

This article briefly discusses the debate over where the next college regatta will be rowed, either at Poughkeepsie or Saratoga. Saratoga is preferred but the inability to transport shells by water to Saratoga may give Poughkeepsie the advantage.

"Regatta on Hudson is Set for June 20/ Date for Races at Poughkeepsie Announced by Intercollegiate Rowing Association/ Change in Lanes Voted/ All Crews Will Row in Middle of River in Order to Assure Fairer Conditions." New York TIMES, January 20, 1932; Page 25, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the date of that years' Regatta as June 20th. It was also decided that there was going to be lane changes this year, meaning that all crews would row in the middle of the river. This policy was meant to help get rid of complaints that the crews on the inner shore had an advantage over the ones in the middle. Now all the crew teams would be rowing in the same water and the conditions would be equal. Times for when the races would be held were also set. Finally, all crews that were invited last year were to be invited again.

"Regatta On Hudson Open To The World/ Stewards Will Invite All Colleges to Send Crews to Poughkeepsie/ Adopt Three-Mile Course/ Shorter Distance to Be Tried for First Time – June 22 is Chosen for Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 12, 1921; Page 23.

An invitation has been sent out to all colleges with crew teams, foreign and domestic, to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The Poughkeepsie Chamber of Commerce has assured the Board of Stewards that they can accommodate a larger group of schools.

"Regatta on June 26 at Poughkeepsie/Stewards also announce that crew not on time for race will be disqualified/Place limit on restarts/only actual breakage of Equipment will be cause for new start/Navy Joins Association," New York TIMES, January 17, 1930; Page 28, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Navy will be joining the Intercollegiate Rowing Association, and that they are the first new team since 1901 to join the association. Some new rules from the Board of Stewards are also announced. Any crew that is late for the start of their race will be disqualified; the race will no longer wait for them. A breakage of equipment in the first 30 seconds of the race will count as a valid restart, but not if it results from a crew member catching a crab or a jumped slide. Finally, a new command will be implemented into the starting call for the race because the crews are now securing their shells in place with ropes, and they must be given time to release the ropes and get ready.

"Regatta Plans Discussed." New York TIMES, October 11, 1940; Page 31, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article relates that the Board of Stewards of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association had an informal dinner meeting where they exchanged ideas for next year's Poughkeepsie Regatta, no official decisions were reached.

"Regatta Remains At Poughkeepsie/ Stewards of Intercollegiate Rowing Body Settle Transportation Tangle/ 150-Pound Crews To Race/ Meeting Votes to Inaugurate Test for Lightweights if as Many as Two Colleges Enter." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 17, 1922; Page 21.

This year's regatta will be held in Poughkeepsie again, and the same observation train that was used last year will be used this year as well. The varsity race will also be three miles long again, although this is not a guarantee for the years to come. The only change is that the stewards agreed to allow a race of 150 pound crews if at least two crews entered.

"Regatta Remedies Outlined By Brown/ Penn Official Writes to Stevenson Suggesting Changes at Poughkeepsie/ Would Ban False Starts/ And Have Crews at Starting Line on Scheduled Time – Denies Callow Will Leave Penn." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 6, 1929; Page 9.

This article lists some new rules that the University of Pennsylvania has suggested should be added to the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The suggestions are that there are three referee's instead of one, that there should be no false starts anymore, and everyone should arrive at the starting line on time.

"Regatta Revival Hinted/ Rowing Body to Act This Fall on Poughkeepsie Feature." New York TIMES, August 16, 1946; Page 15, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the chairman of the Board of Stewards, and the secretary of the IRA inspected the Hudson today, with hopes of restoring the Poughkeepsie Regatta there as soon as possible. No decisions will be made until the fall however.

"Regatta Stewards Meet/ July 2 Chosen for the Intercollegiate Boat Races at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 27, 1901; Page 10.

This article announces the date that was chosen for the Poughkeepsie Regatta to be held at.

"Regatta Veiled In Mist And Words/ Announcers Find It a Difficult Task to Describe Boat Race – Listeners Puzzled by Indefinite Information." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1929; Page XX14.

This article posts the criticism of many radio station listeners, who complained that the announcers at the Poughkeepsie Regatta was very confusing and they never knew what was going on. The declared it would be better to just say at the end who won and not try to broadcast the race. The radio stations defended themselves saying it was very hard to see what was going on, it was dark out, and there was a mist on the river.

"Regulations Issued For Hudson Regatta/ Secretary of Commerce Prescribes Rules for the Boats at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1922; Page 25.

The Secretary of Commerce has posted some regulations for all pleasure craft that will be on the Hudson at the time of the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

Rendel, John, "Ship-Shore Radio Keeps Fans Posted/ Proves a Boon to Spectators at Semi-Visible Regatta on Hudson at Poughkeepsie/ Miss Observation Cars/ Fleet Anchors Near the Finish Line – Charge of $2 and Up Made for Car Parking." New York TIMES, June 22, 1947; Section 5, Page 5, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. There were not nearly as many spectators as there have been in previous years. It is believed that a big reason for this was the lack of the observation train. Most of the spectators only got a couple of glimpses of the Regatta, instead of a good view. Luckily they were kept informed because of a ship to shore radio system that was hooked up to give the spectators the play by play. There were many pennants up, and pretty much every school had an even number of them, but there still was not the old Regatta atmosphere in Poughkeepsie as there had been in past years. No betting was made on the race because there was no clear cut favorite. This page has two charts on it.

"Renewal of Poughkeepsie Regatta Assured; Economy Wave Expected to Reduce Entries." New York TIMES, January 3, 1933; Page 16, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Maxwell Stevenson, chairman of the Stewards of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association believes firmly that the Regatta will be held this year as usual. There will of course be fewer entries this year because of the bad economic situation, but Stevenson does not believe that that is any reason to cancel the Regatta. Stevenson's own college, Columbia, will be planning on running a full crew schedule for the spring, and will plan on sending three crews to the Regatta as usual. The Board of Stewards will be meeting on January 12th to discuss exactly what will happen with the Regatta that year.

"Rest At Poughkeepsie/ College Oarsmen Spend Quiet Sunday on Banks of Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1914; Page 7.

This article briefly describes the day of rest that the oarsmen, with the exception of Washington, enjoyed this Sunday.

"Revised Program Announced For Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1923; Page 15.

There has been a change made to the program of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the junior varsity will be rowed first, before the freshmen race.

"Rice Dubious Over 4-Mile Distance/ Columbia Coach Does Not Believe Poughkeepsie Race Will Be Changed This Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 23, 1923; Page 16.

Coach Rice of Columbia is an avid supporter of the four-mile distance for the Poughkeepsie Regatta race, but he does not believe it will be changed for this year's race because the shorter distances still have too many supporters.

"Rice Favors 3-Mile Race/ Columbia Crew Coach Falls in Line with Wright and Courtney." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 30, 1917; Page 10.

Coach Rice of Columbia has agreed with Coach Wright of Pennsylvania and Coach Courtney, former Coach of Cornell, that the Poughkeepsie Regatta should be reduced to three miles.

"Rice Is In Favor Of Week-Long Regatta/ Would Substitute Series of Events for Poughkeepsie Race – Suggests Pelham Bay." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York, TIMES, Feb. 20, 1921; Page 21.

The head coach of Columbia wants to substitute the Poughkeepsie Regatta for a week long series of rowing events. He feels this would be very popular and would bring rowing to national attention.

"Rice Makes More Shifts/ Leys Now Stroke in Prospective Lineup for Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 20, 1916; Page 13.

This article reveals that Coach Rice has made a change to his crew lineup, and it is believed that this lineup will remain until the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Rice Makes Radical Changes In Line-Up/ Both First and Second Columbia Varsities Altered for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1922; Page 16.

The coach for Columbia made some radical changes in the line-ups of both his varsity and junior varsity boats.

"Rice Shifts Oarsmen/ Columbia Coach Makes Experiments with New Boatings." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1915; Page 9.

This article describes the changes that Coach Rice made to his crews.

"Rice Promises Shake-ups/ Oarsmen Must Deliver Goods to Get Seats in Columbia Crew." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1915; Page 9.

This article posts the Columbia coach's statement that there will be many shake-ups in his crews line-ups based on how his men perform in practice.

"Rice Wants A Launch/ Columbia Coach Still Without Boat in Which to Follow Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1914; Page 8.

This article lists the final changes that are being made to any boat before the Regatta, and also comments on the fact that Coach Rice of Columbia is still without a coaching launch to follow his crews in when they practice.

Richardson, William D., "Poughkeepsie Regatta, Omitted for Five Years, Will Be Revived This June/ College Oarsmen To Renew Classic/ 45th Annual Crew Races Over Course at Poughkeepsie Set for June 21/ Event Last Held in 1941/ Varsity Contest This Year to Be at Three Mile Instead of Customary Four." New York TIMES, January 27, 1947; Page 20, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be resumed this year after a five year gap. The only change will be that the Varsity race will be three miles long instead of four miles long this year. Washington was the last school to win the Poughkeepsie Regatta back in 1941, and all the usual schools are expected to be invited. The article also lists, for those who had lost track in the five year hiatus, which schools had won the Varsity event, and how many times they took home that honor. Cornell is still easily on top, with fifteen Poughkeepsie Regatta championships, even thought the last time Cornell won the Regatta was back in 1930.

"Rise In Regatta Fund/ Poughkeepsie Asked to Put Up $10,000 for Rowing Classic." New York TIMES, February 7, 1950; Page 33, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article reveals that Poughkeepsie has been asked to put up $10,000 in order to hold the Regatta there again this year. Poughkeepsie had already guaranteed $6,000 towards the Regatta and the mayor announced that he would ask the City Council for another $4,000. The Board of Stewards will be traveling to Ohio soon to inspect the site that they are proposing to hold the Regatta at.

"Rival Coaches Join In Praise for Navy/Wray, Ulbrickson and Others Rank Victors as the Best Eight in the Regatta/Glendon Not Surprised/Asserts Triumphant Crew Was Great All Year and Merely Got Together at Poughkeepsie/Crowd Undaunted By Drenching Rain/Thousands Hold Points of Vantage on Banks of Hudson-Huge Floating Gallery on Hand/Navy Oarsmen Pick Shelton as Captain/Cornell Chooses McManus and California Selects Woodward as Leader," New York TIMES, June 17, 1931; Page 20, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article interviewed each of the coach's and they all praised the Navy Crew for their performance in the race. It also discusses how the crowds packed in to see this years' Regatta, despite the rain and mugginess. The people packed the shoreline, the observation train was sold out, and there were hundreds of boats lining the sides of the river for people to watch the race from.

"Rival College Oarsmen/ Sixteen Crews at Poughkeepsie – More Trouble for Columbia – Light Work by Harvard and Yale." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1902; Page 5.

This article gives a very brief rundown of how all sixteen crews have been preparing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Rough Water May Put Off Regatta/ Rooters for Four College Crews Fear Weather Will Lead to a Postponement/ No Boat Made Favorite/ Syracuse alone is Confident, but There is the Old Feeling That Cornell Will Be the Winner." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1916; Page 12.

A description of how all the crews have been performing, the nerves the oarsmen are feeling, and a discussion of the race possibly being postponed due to the rain.

"Rough Water On Hudson/ Crews Make No Progress in Training – Columbia Abandons Ward Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1914; Page 10.

This article mentions how the rough water on the Hudson has been delaying practice. Columbia was the only crew that made it out in the morning, but all crews went out that evening for practice.

"Rough Water Puts Oarsmen To Test/ Crews in Stiff Practice on Hudson – Two Syracuse Men Out With Sore Hands." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1921; Page 11.

The water on the Hudson was rough today, but that did not stop any crew from going out to practice in the tough conditions.

"Rowed Despite Injury/ Remmer of Columbia Hurt on Morning of Poughkeepsie Race." New York TIMES, June 21, 1939; Page 30, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Henry Remmer, captain of the Columbia Varsity team rowed the Regatta with a fractured nose and a cut forehead. He was injured the morning of the Regatta when a flagpole broke off and hit him on the head while he was standing outside the boathouse talking to his coach.

"Rowed With Rib Fracture/ Daggett, Californian, Unaware of Nature of Injury in Race." New York TIMES, June 28, 1936; Section 5, Page 3, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Daggett, who rows no. 5 in the California Varsity boat, rowed the Poughkeepsie Regatta with a fractured rib. He had complained of soreness in the beginning of the week and the trainer had taped his side, thinking it was a strained muscle. X-rays taken after the race revealed that the rib was in fact broken. Daggett comments, however, that the injury did not bother him at all during the climactic race against Washington at the Regatta.

"Rowing Body Honors Troy/ Poughkeepsie's Citizens' Regatta Official Guest at Dinner." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Oct. 17, 1929; Page 40.

This article briefly mentions a dinner that was held by the Intercollegiate Rowing Association where Peter H. Troy, the chairman of the Poughkeepsie Citizens' Regatta Committee, was the honored guest.

"Rowing Body Joins Bushnell's Office/ Stevenson Quits Over Policy on Personnel and Shift in Conduct of Hudson Races/ Captain King Successor/ Poughkeepsie Regatta Set for June 25 – Groups in Other Sports Name Executives." New York TIMES, January 11, 1941; Page 10, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that at the meeting of the Board of Stewards, Maxwell Stevenson resigned as chairman. The reason given for his resignation was a dispute that has been going on in the board for sometime. Mr. Stevenson believes that the members of the board should be former oarsmen, when two of the members appointed this year were not former oarsmen; Mr. Stevenson gave his resignation as chairman. Captain T. S. King of the United States Naval Academy has now taken his place as chairman. It was also determined at this meeting that this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta will be held on June 25th, with the freshmen race beginning at 4:45 p.m. The usual group of players will be invited to participate in the Regatta.

"Rowing Officials Uphold 4-Mile Test/ Intercollegiate Board Not Likely to Change Course for the Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 8, 1926; Page 12.

This article reveals that the rowing officials for the Poughkeepsie Regatta have decided to keep the four mile distance for the varsity race that they put back into effect last year. Prior to last year the four mile distance had not been raced since 1916 due to disagreements over the length.

"Rowing Season Is Close To Climax/ Poughkeepsie and New London Regattas Are the Sole Remaining Fixtures/ Six To Face Hudson Test/ Navy and Cornell Crews Favorites for Highest Honor – Yale Has Problem Like That of 1921." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 28, 1922; Page 22.

The Poughkeepsie Regatta and the Yale-Harvard race are the only rowing competitions left this year, and they both are expected to be exciting. Six crews are going to be participating in the varsity race of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and it is still a possibility that there will be the first 150 pound race at the Poughkeepsie regatta this year.

"Rowing Site Inspected/ College Officials 'Impressed' With Marietta Facilities." New York TIMES, March 9, 1950; Page 36, Col 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

Representatives of the Board of Stewards for the National Regatta inspected the Marietta, Ohio site and were very impressed by what they saw there. They will report back to the rest of the board and a decision will soon be reached on where the Regatta will be held.

"Rowing Stewards Meet; Regatta Dates Chosen/ American R. A. Discusses Action of the Henley Stewards/ N.A.A.O. Gets Preference/ Decision By Parent Body Awaited – Races Will Be Held at Philadelphia and Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 23, 1906; Page 9.

This article announces that the Board of Stewards met, decided the races that will be held next year, as well as that the races will be held at Poughkeepsie, and not a different location.

"Rowing Stewards Want Statistics/ Investigation Will Soon Be Instituted at All Colleges to Settle Question of Injury." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 1, 1915; Page 7.

This article discusses an in depth investigation that the Board of Stewards is having done to see if rowing four miles in indeed injurious to crew members.

"Rowing Stewards Will Meet Today/ Board to Decide on Distance of Race and Place for Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 19, 1923; Page 14.

The Board of Stewards will meet today to decide many questions on the regatta, such as where it will be held, on what date, how long the varsity race will be, and how they will secure an observation train for the race.

"Rutgers Crew Gets Bid/ Invited to Compete in Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, May 9, 1941; Page 29, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Rutgers' Varsity Eight has been invited to participate in this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. It is considered likely that they will accept, which will mean there will be a record breaking nine crews in the Varsity race of the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. The invitation will be for this year only, and further invitations will depend on how many participants there are in the Regatta, since only so many crews can fit comfortably on the Hudson.

"Rutgers Crew Invited To Poughkeepsie Regatta." New York TIMES, January 31, 1934; Page 23, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Rutgers was invited to row at the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. The Rutgers coach announced that he could give no assurances yet of Rutgers attendance at the Regatta. The crew program at the college was just organized last year as an intramural sport, and nobody is certain what the status of the sport at the college will be.

"Rutgers Seeking Funds/ Students Hope to Raise $1,500 to Send Crew to Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, May 16, 1941; Page 30, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Rutgers' Varsity crew received permission to go to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, but they must raise the money themselves because the school has no funds available.

"Saratoga May Be Chosen/ Tempting Offers for the Intercollegiate Regattas in June/ Some Objections To The Course/ A Hard Place for the Public to Reach – Why the Selection of Poughkeepsie Would Be More Popular." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 26, 1896; Page 6.

This article discusses how Saratoga may be chosen for the location of the Intercollegiate Regatta, due to the fact that Saratoga has made a much more generous funding offer than Poughkeepsie has. However, Poughkeepsie is preferable because there are wonderful opportunities for spectators to view the race from, while there are none at Saratoga.

"The Schedule of Three Races For Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1924; Page 27.

This article lists what the schedule for the races of the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be.

"Scull Rowing Advocated/ Favor Abolishing the Sweeps for the More Even Style." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 23, 1906; Page 7.

This article discusses the quadruple sculls; a form of rowing that is being introduced to the Poughkeepsie Regatta for the first time.

"Second Crews Race On Hudson Today/ Cornell, Columbia, Syracuse, Penn Substitutes to Open Regatta Preliminaries." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1929; Page 18.

This article announces that the substitute teams for the college crews will be starting the races of the Regatta by racing tomorrow for a mile and a half at 4:00.

"Secretary Adams will watch crew races from a destroyer." New York TIMES, June 23, 1930; Page 25, Col 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

A U.S. Destroyer will be sailing up the Hudson River so that Secretary Adams will be able to watch the Regatta from the destroyer.

"Service To Be Unchanged/ Rain Will Not Interfere With Poughkeepsie Observation Trains." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1922; Page 23.

In the event of rain during the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the observation trains will continue to run as normal.

"Seven Crew for Race/ No New Entries Expected for the Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, February 3, 1908; Page 7.

The Board of Stewards expects the same colleges as last year to participate in this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. There was also a rumor that the University of Washington would enter the Regatta, but nobody expects that to come about. Many people are happy that the Regatta is scheduled to be on the weekend this year, which will allow a lot more people to attend. The city is already preparing for one of the biggest crowds the Poughkeepsie Regatta has ever had.

"Seven Crews Hold Workouts On Hudson/ Navy, Columbia and Syracuse in Practice at Poughkeepsie." New York TIMES, June 19, 1938; Sec. 5, Page 3, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article briefly describes the workouts of Navy, Columbia, and Syracuse on the Hudson. All three schools had all of their teams out putting in good practices.

"Seven Crews Out On Hudson Course/ Glendon Watches Columbia Boats at Poughkeepsie – Wisconsin and Penn Also Practice." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1926; Page 23.

This article reveals that the weather was beautiful and all seven crews were out on the Hudson practicing for the Regatta.

"Several Oarsmen in Camp." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 2, 1928; Page 12.

This article announces that Columbia has arrived on the Hudson to begin their training.

"Shake-Up in Penn's Crews/ Second Crew and two of the Varsity fours were disbanded." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 2, 1900; Page 11.

This article announces that Pennsylvania has broken up their Jayvee crew and two of their varsity four crews. The coach then constructed a varsity eight, a varsity four and a freshman eight out of the broken up crews. This gives these new teams under a month to prepare for the Poughkeepsie Regatta in June. The crew members of each boat are also listed.

Sheehan, Joseph M., "Regatta Shifted From the Hudson/Stewards Hope to Hold Rowing Races on Onondaga, Cayuga or the Severn River/Earlier Date Dictated/Revised College Programs and Poughkeepsie Tides Prompt Change From Old Course." New York TIMES, April 21, 1942; Page 30, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Regatta will definitely not be held at Poughkeepsie on the Hudson River this year. The reasons behind this decision to temporarily move the Regatta all have to do with the war. The biggest reason is that because of the war, college schedules have been moved up. Summer school sessions will be starting earlier, so the Regatta must be held early in June, unfortunately the earliest it can be held on the Hudson because of the tides is June 13th, and that's too late. It will also cost a lot of money to open the Poughkeepsie boathouses for the necessary time for the crews to adjust to the Hudson, and there most likely will be no observation train because it was dismantled for use in the war.

"Shift To Ithaca Only Temporary/ Intercollegiate Regatta Likely to Return to Poughkeepsie Next Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 5, 1920; Page 25.

Holding the regatta in Ithaca was only temporary, and the Board of Stewards has every intention of holding the regatta next year at Poughkeepsie. They are also very hopeful of having the observation train again.

"Showers Curtail Rowing on Hudson/ Three Navy Eights Engage in Spirited Upstream Drill Following Easy Paddle." New York TIMES, June 18, 1937; Page 28, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article describes the day's workouts for each school. Every school put in some sort of workout today, although all workouts were cut short in the evening because of rough waters and the threat of rain. This article has a picture with it.

"Six Crews Are Invited/ Intercollegiate Body Asks Non-Members to Race on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 22, 1924; Page 13.

This article announces that the IRA has invited six colleges that are not a part of the association to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Six Crews To Row At Poughkeepsie/ Definite Entries Are Received From Washington and Navy – Wisconsin May Come." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 18, 1922; Page 25.

Navy and Washington will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, along with the four colleges that make up the intercollegiate rowing association. Wisconsin may also end up sending a crew to the Hudson, and while rowing authorities were hopeful that Princeton would participate, it is not likely.

"Special Regatta Trains/ Railroads Arrange Service Between Here and Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1921; Page 19.

Special arrangements have been made by the West Shore Railroad Company and Grand Central to accommodate the large amount of people they expect to be going to the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Stalwart Yale Oarsmen/Candidates for the Varsity Crew to Meet on Saturday/Five of the Old Crew in College/It is not probable that a crew will go to England-they may enter the Poughkeepsie Race." The New York TIMES, January 9, 1896; Page 15.

This article discusses Yale's rowing program and the formation of their Varsity team. The article mentions that Yale was considering entering the Poughkeepsie Regatta that had been proposed for that year. This occurred at the very beginnings of the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Stanford at Poughkeepsie/ Californians May Row in Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 26, 1912; Page 12.

This New York Times article reveals that Stanford University has requested to be allowed to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Stanford Crew Invited/ Pacific Coast Eight Will Row in Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 9, 1912; Page 12.

This article announces that Stanford has been officially invited to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and they accepted, having raised enough money to transport them there and back.

"Stanford Gets A Boat/ Columbia Shell Loaned to California Crew for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 16, 1912; Page C8.

This article announces that Columbia has loaned Stanford the boat that their Varsity used last year. It's an excellent boat, and it will put Stanford among the top teams as far as equipment is concerned. The boat is built by the same highly rated English boat builder that built Stanford's own boat, which is unfortunately being held up at Southampton because of dock strikes.

"Stanford On Hudson/ Cornell Oarsmen Hopeful of Seeing Westerners Compete." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 5, 1912; Page C8.

This article announces that Stanford has made a plea to be invited to the Poughkeepsie Regatta by the Board of Stewards, and Cornell is supporting their request. Stanford is considered to be an excellent team on the West Coast, and it is believed they would make a great showing in Poughkeepsie. The rules for the West coast teams are the same as the East, so that is not anticipated to be a problem. Money will be an issue, however, because it will take a lot of money to transport the crew across the country and back again, but the crew members are already having fundraisers to earn the money.

"Stanford Will Not Row/ One Man Barred, Crew is Not to Compete at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 20, 1916; Page 13.

This article reveals that Stanford will not be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Starting Times and Lanes For Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1923; Page 13.

This article lists what lanes each crew is going to be in for each race, as well as what time the races will begin.

"Statements by Rival College Coaches on Prospects at Poughkeepsie Today." New York TIMES, June 26, 1930; Page 19, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article features interviews of all the head coaches of all the varsity crew teams, giving predictions on how they felt their team would do in the Poughkeepsie Regatta that year.

"Steamers for Poughkeepsie Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1903; Page 7.

This article announces that the steamers General Slocum and Chester W. Chapin will be making special trips to Poughkeepsie so that their passengers can watch the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The boats will be anchoring somewhere near the finish line.

"Stewards Cancel College Regatta/ Rowing Group Unable to Find Date Convenient to Majority of the Contestants/ 3D Break In Long Series/ Other Interruptions to Title Event Came During the Last War and in 1933." New York TIMES, May 13, 1942; Page 26, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be cancelled for this year. Because of the war, all schools have different schedules, and a common date in which most schools would be able to attend was unable to be found. The stewards decided that they did not want to hold the Regatta at all without a good representative entry of the rowing schools in the United States, so they chose not to have the Regatta at all. It has not been determined for how many years this cancellation will last. There have only been two other interruptions in the history of the Regatta. The first during the First World War, in the years 1917 through 1919, and once during the Great Depression in the year 1933.

"Stewards Decide To Cancel Regatta/ Poughkeepsie Classic Called Off for Year by Unanimous Vote of Officials/ Plan to Resume in 1934/ Break is First, Except for the War, Since Event Was Inaugurated 38 Years Ago/ Give Economy as Reason/ Syracuse as Well as Cornell, Will not finance Eight – Penn, Navy, Columbia to Maintain Crews." New York TIMES, January 13, 1933; Page 20, Col 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Poughkeepsie Regatta will not be held this year because of the financial situation across the country. This is the first cancellation in the history of the Regatta, not including the cancellation that happened because of the Great War. Penn State, Navy, and Columbia will be some of the few colleges to finance their crew teams despite the cancellation of the Regatta. Cornell and Syracuse will not even be able to have a crew team at all this year. All schools and all the members of the Board of Stewards expressed their disappointment at not being able to have a Regatta this year.

"Stewards Favor Shorter Course/ 'Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie Regatta Likely to be Reduced to Three Miles." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Nov. 23, 1914; Page 9.

This article reveals that the Poughkeepsie Regatta may be shortened to three miles, although nothing is definite yet.

"Stewards to Act on Regatta Today/ Invitations Will Be Sent as Usual Despite Withdrawal of Cornell's Crew/ Alumni Still Hopeful/ Plans Already Tentatively Set to Raise Funds to Send Eight to the Classic." New York TIMES, January 12, 1933; Page 22, Col. 8; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces the meeting of the Board of Stewards today, which may have historic consequences if the Poughkeepsie Regatta is cancelled this year. The Cornell administration has definitely decided not to aid the crew team, or any other spring team in attending events this year. The Cornell alumni, however, are still very hopeful that they will be able to raise funds on their own to send an Eight to Poughkeepsie to row. Many teams this year cannot come, such as Wisconsin, Washington, Cornell, and possibly even California, the defending champions.

"Stiff Winds Greets Cornell On Hudson/ Eights Have First Practice at Poughkeepsie – Coach Shifts Junior Varsity/ Washington Men Are Ill/ Specialist Is Called to Treat Boils on Several Oarsmen – Columbia Increases Speed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1924; Page 15.

This article details the practices of the crews on the Hudson, and informs the reader that the Washington crew, which is stricken with boils, are being treated by a doctor.

"Storm Stops Crews At Poughkeepsie/ Prevents Columbia, Penn and Wisconsin From Having Evening Practice – Long Spins at Noon." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1925; Page 21.

This article discusses how a storm that has come up in Poughkeepsie is effecting the practice routines of the crews on the Hudson.

"Strong Strokes Middies/ Takes Place of Eddy, Called Home – Crews Start Poughkeepsie Work." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 1, 1927; Page 33.

This article announces that the Navy crews began practicing today for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and that the stroke for the Varsity crew has been momentarily switched.

"Sudden Wind Halts Crews' Time Trials/ Tests Under Watches Planned by Coaches Are Thwarted on Poughkeepsie Course/ Washington Loses Luft/ Oarsmen Seized With Chills and Fever Is Replaced in Varsity by Kerns – All Eights Practice." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1924; Page 22.

This article reveals that a strong wind stopped practice on the Hudson, and one of the Washington crew members has become ill, as well as what the other crews have done for practice.

"Suggest Race Change/ Reader Would Place Coaches on Poughkeepsie Board." New York TIMES, June 22, 1940; Page 22, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article was written by a reader, and he suggests that there be at least two coaches on the Board of Stewards, because they are more involved with the rowers, and would have a better idea of when weather conditions are bad as well as other matters such as that. The reader does not want rowing to be spoiled because of the mistakes of men who are not really connected with the sport of rowing anymore.

"Syracuse Betting That They Will Win/ Notwithstanding Their Confidence, Cornell Is Favored in All Races/ Columbia Money Scarce/ Blue and White Adherents Not Sure That Their Oarsmen Can Go the Distance with Heavier Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1914; Page 11.

This article discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta, the upcoming Poughkeepsie Regatta, and who is entered to race in it. It also briefly talks about how there will be no four-oared race in the Regatta for the first time this year, and it talks about the betting that is going on about who will win.

"Syracuse Boat In Crash/ Varsity Eights Runs Against Skiff, Badly Damaged Shell." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1908; Page 2.

This article reveals that the Syracuse crew boat crashed with a skiff and had 6 feet torn off. While the boat will be ready for the big race in two days, it will not be ready to allow the crew team to finish their practice card for the week, which is feared will put a damper on the men's enthusiasm.

"Syracuse Captain Out Of First Crew/ Coach Ten Eyck Announces Rammi Will Row With Junior Varsity at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1921; Page 20.

Syracuse, Columbia, and California were all out practicing today on the Hudson.

"Syracuse Crew To Row/ Varsity, Jayvees and Cubs Entered in Poughkeepsie Regatta." New York TIMES, May 29, 1934; Page 24, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article officially announces that Syracuse would be entering three teams into the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, instead of only varsity and freshmen as originally thought.

"Syracuse Crews Leave For Camp On Hudson/ Varsity Stock Rises When Freeman Is Declared Eligible to Compete." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1928; Page 33.

This article announces that the Syracuse oarsmen have left tonight for Poughkeepsie; it also lists the crew lineup for all three of their crews.

"Syracuse Crews Twice Victorious/ Orange First in 'Varsity and Junior Races, with Cornell Next and Columbia Third/ Quakers a Bad Fourth/ Ten Eyck's Oarsmen Jump Into the Lead Early and Are Never Headed by Rivals/ Weather Delays Contest/ Race Starts at 7:30, with Night Fast Coming On – Freshmen Event is Postponed Until Tomorrow." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1916; Page 19.

This article announces that Syracuse won both the varsity and junior varsity races on the Hudson. The Freshmen race was postponed until tomorrow due to night rapidly approaching. A description of the races is given, and the names of all the crew members and what position they rowed in are listed for every school.

"Syracuse Eight to Row." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1901; Page 8.

This article reveals that Syracuse will be sending a crew to participate in the Varsity eight oared race at Poughkeepsie.

"Syracuse First In Big Crew Race/ Orange Oarsmen Win 'Varsity Contest in Intercollegiate Regatta on Cayuga Lake/ Cornell Eight Is Second/ Columbia Finishes Third, with Pennsylvania Fourth – Row Two Miles in 11:02 3-5/ Ithacans Score Twice/ Lead Junior and Freshmen Rivals Over Course in View of Thousands of Spectators." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1920; Page 20.

Even though Cornell won the freshmen and junior varsity races, it was Syracuse who came away with the honors of winning the varsity race with a decisive victory over Cornell. Columbia came in third and Pennsylvania finished fourth. The article goes on to give a detailed description of the varsity race.

"Syracuse Freshmen Win By 2 ½ Lengths/ Beat California, With Columbia Cubs 5th – Cornell Junior Varsity Triumphs." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1929; Page 31.

This article announces that Syracuse won the freshmen race and Cornell won the Junior Varsity race. The article goes on to describe how the two races played out.

"Syracuse Is Dark Horse Of Regatta/ Orange Oarsmen May Confound Critics in Poughkeepsie Race Tomorrow/ Navy Is Favored To Win/ Cornell and Washington Also Conceded Fine Chance to Capture Annual Rowing Classic." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1922; Page 25.

The Poughkeepsie Regatta is almost here, and Navy is widely considered to be the favorite, although Cornell and Washington are also thought to be very strong contenders. Syracuse, however, has puzzled everyone and nobody quite knows what to expect from the Orange crew when race day arrives. They have been termed the dark horse for this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Syracuse J.V. Withdrawn/ Injury to Stroke Puts Crew Out of Poughkeepsie Regatta." New York TIMES, June 3, 1941; Page 27, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Syracuse Jayvee crew has been withdrawn from the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The stroke of the Jayvee crew was injured and will be unable to row, and Coach Ned Ten Eyck does not have a sufficient replacement for him. The Jayvee crew members will travel with Syracuse to Poughkeepsie and act as substitutes for the Varsity crew.

"Syracuse Jayvees out of crew race/Mishaps result in decision to concentrate on Varsity for Poughkeepsie Regatta/Coast Eights Go 4 Miles/Washington Timed in 19:37.5 Despite Rough Water and California in 19:37." New York TIMES, June 19, 1936; Page 24, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Syracuse will be pulling its Junior Varsity boat from competition this year. There have been several mishaps and injured rowers on the junior varsity and the varsity squads, and the coaches would rather have one strong varsity than two weak eights. California and Washington both had time trials today, despite rough water, and they both did very well submitting similar times.

"Syracuse Jayvees Triumph by Length/Break Away Near End to Lead California and Cornell, with Columbia Fourth/Washington Freshmen Win/Show Length in Front of Cornell, With Syracuse, Navy and Columbia Trailing in Order," New York TIMES, June 17, 1931; Page 20, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article gives a detailed description of the freshmen and Junior Varsity races. Washington won the freshmen race while Syracuse won the Junior Varsity race.

"Syracuse Jayvees Win Exciting Race/ Fighting Crew Defeats Navy by A Quarter Length-Washington Cubs Excel/ Ebright Praises Washington Eight/ California Coach says His Crew Beat Splendid Combination-Happy Over Victory/ Big Fleet Anchors At The Finish Line/ Scene is Reminiscent of the Pre-Depression Days – Many Large Boats Present/ Crowd Lines Bank To Watch Regatta/ Gallery Arrives at Scene of Races in All Manner of Conveyances/ 1/500 On Special Train/ But Majority of 75,000 See the Crews From Hills and Rooftops Along Shore." New York TIMES, June 17, 1934; Sec. III, Page 5, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article gives a brief account of the jayvee and the freshmen races. Syracuse won the Jayvee race and Washington won the freshmen race. There is also speculation in the article that if the Washington freshmen crew keeps intact, it will be a very big contender next year in the jayvee or varsity races. The article also gives clips of interviews from some of the coaches commenting on the races. Ky Ebright was very happy with his California varsity considering the triumph over Washington to be a huge victory. The article also reported that this was the biggest crowd of spectators to watch the Regatta since the depression began. The hills and rooftops, river sides and observation train were all packed with spectators. This page has two pictures and three charts on it.

"Syracuse Joins Hudson Fleet." All Crews at Poughkeepsie Now That Will Row in Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1911; Page 10.

This article announces that Syracuse University has arrived on the Hudson River to begin practicing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta. With the arrival of Syracuse, all participating crew teams are now in Poughkeepsie.

"Syracuse Junior Varsity Out Of the Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 6, 1927; Page 31.

This article reveals that Syracuse is not going to send a Junior Varsity crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta, only Varsity and Freshmen crews.

"Syracuse Oarsmen At Poughkeepsie/ Join Columbia and California Crews on Hudson – Rice Rescues Freshmen." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 9, 1921; Page 22.

Syracuse has arrived on the Hudson to begin practice, joining the three other colleges already present. The Columbia crews had an exciting day when one of their freshmen was thrown from the boat in practice and had to be rescued by the coach.

"Syracuse Oarsmen At Poughkeepsie/ Join Columbia in Workout on the Hudson for Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1923; Page 14.

Syracuse arrived on the Hudson and immediately began practicing, while Columbia also had a strenuous workout.

"Syracuse Oarsmen Hold First Paddle/ Coach Ten Eyck Forced to Delay Poughkeepsie Start Until Evening, Sends Away 3 Crews." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1926; Page 21.

This article reveals that Syracuse had their first practice on the Hudson this evening.

"Syracuse Oarsmen Honored/ Monster Demonstration for Crews That Won at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1904; Page 7.

This article gives a brief description of a celebration that was held in honor of the Syracuse rowers who won the Varsity and the freshmen races at the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Syracuse Oarsmen Win On The Hudson/ Cornell's Crews Beaten in 'Varsity and Freshmen Races/ Ithacan Four Easily Win/ Victors in the Main Contest Outsides in the Betting – Courtney's Methods Criticized." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1904; Page 5.

This article reveals that Syracuse won the Varsity and Freshmen races at the Poughkeepsie Regatta, while Cornell won the four oared race. A detailed description of each race is given.

"Syracuse Off For Hudson/ Squad of Twenty-two Will Hold First Practice Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1927; Page 33.

This article announces that Syracuse have left for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Syracuse On Rowing Board/ Orange Formally Admitted to Intercollegiate Association." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 28, 1921; Page 19.

Syracuse has been made a member of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association, and will also send a representative to be on the Board of Stewards.

"Syracuse Out Of Poughkeepsie Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1900; Page 9.

This article reveals that Syracuse will not be competing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta due to financial difficulties.

"Syracuse Out Of Race/ Jayvees Not to Row on Hudson – Californians Head East Today." New York TIMES, June 5, 1937; Page 11, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Syracuse Jayvee team is withdrawing from the Regatta this year. Apparently four of the members had to take summer jobs that would make them unable to attend and another was ill. The article also reports that California has begun its long voyage across the country to the Regatta.

"Syracuse Spoils A Cornell Day/ Ithaca Oarsmen, After Winning Two Races, Lose the Big Event at Poughkeepsie/ A Great 'Varsity Race/ Salt City Crew's Desperate Effort to Land Lead Makes Most Sensational Finish/ Columbia's Poor Showing/ Blue and White Couldn't Do Better Than Third All Day – Smaller Crowd Than Usual at Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1913; Page S1.

This article in the New York Times reveals who the winners were for all three races of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, Cornell winning the first two, but Syracuse winning the big Varsity race. Detailed accounts of each of the races are given in the article, as well as the day's festivities.

"Syracuse Varsity Eight Shows Power in Time Trial on the Hudson/ College Oarsmen In Double Drills/ Cornell Watched Closely by Others at Poughkeepsie – Wisconsin Optimistic/ Change Is Made At Yale/ Blair Replaces Wallace as Varsity Stroke – Harvard Goes for Long Row." New York TIMES, June 11, 1940; Page 37, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces how each of the schools that are currently on the Hudson is doing for practice. Everyone seems to be in good condition, and so far nobody seems to be out of their league. Syracuse and Cornell in particular are looking like they will be in excellent shape, and they are being watched closely by the rival teams to see what kind of threat they will be in the end.

"Syracuse Will Not Enter 150-Pound Crew in Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 26, 1922; Page 27.

Syracuse will not be entering a 150-Pound crew in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. They determined it would be too much of a hassle to transport another whole crew of men to Poughkeepsie, and especially a fourth boat.

"Syracuse Wins Great Varsity Eight-Oared Race On Hudson/ Columbia Crew Less Than Half a Length Behind at Finish – Cornell Shell Wrecked in 4-Oared Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 28, 1908; Page S1.

This article announces that Syracuse won the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The article replays the entire day's events in detail.

"Syracuse's Shell Runs Onto A Rock/ Junior Varsity Meets Accident on Hudson, but Craft is Only Scratched/ California Is Watched/ Others Await Its Time Trial to See Its Speed – Washington Out Early." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1928; Page 25.

This article reveals that the Syracuse Junior Varsity crashed into a rock on the Hudson in practice, luckily the shell was only scratched and not badly damaged. The rest of the article reports on California and Washington and the interest that the others schools have in the ability.

"Talk Of The Rowing Experts." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1897; Page 3.

Two different strokes will be displayed at Poughkeepsie. Harvard and Yale use the English form of stroking, while Cornell uses the new American stroke. The better stroke will be determined by whoever wins the race.

"Talks With The Victors/ Coach Courtney and All the Rest Expected to Win, of Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1897; Page 2.

This article posts an interview that was held with Coach Courtney of Cornell.

"Ten Eyck Favors Regatta/ Syracuse Crew Coach Opposed to Dropping Poughkeepsie Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 7, 1918; Page 12.

The Syracuse crew coach is strongly opposed to doing away with the Poughkeepsie Regatta for good.

"Ten Eyck For Longer Race/ Syracuse Coach Disparages Plan to Shorten Big Crew Classics." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Page 10.

The coach of Syracuse's crew team does not want to shorten the Poughkeepsie Regatta to three miles. He does not feel that the four miles injures the crew members in the least.

"Ten Eyck Is Standing Pat/ Syracuse 'Varsity Crew Unchanged for Poughkeepsie Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1916; Page S2.

This article announces that Syracuse will be leaving for Poughkeepsie on Tuesday night.

"Thirty-Car Observation Train To Follow Poughkeepsie Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 17, 1921; Page 24.

The train that will be following the Yale-Harvard race will be sent up to Poughkeepsie for the Regatta.

"This Crew Is Too Late/ Washington Waited Too Long to Get Into Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1908; Page S2.

This article announces that the University of Washington will not be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, they sent in their petition to participate in the Regatta too late and the committee was not able to provide accommodations for them.

"Thompson Houseboat Donated To Navy Crews for Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 4, 1927; Page 11.

This article reveals that Colonel Thompson, an alumnus of the Naval Academy, is donating his houseboat to the Navy crews to use during their stay at Poughkeepsie.

"Thousands Gather To Watch Regatta/ Great Throng to See Battles of College Oarsmen on Surface of Cayuga Today." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1920; Page 21.

The spectators began swarming into Ithaca today and the city was bursting with excitement, color, and decorations. There is a lot of speculation about which crews will finish in which place, and also why Coach Courtney switched his varsity crew from the heavy to the light team.

"Three Crews Busy On Hudson Course/ Pennsylvania Joins Syracuse and Columbia at Poughkeepsie – Rice Pleased." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 17, 1923; Page S5.

All three crews currently at Poughkeepsie were very busy practicing on the Hudson today.

"Three Crews On Hudson/ Coach Rice Begins Training of Columbia Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 3, 1914; Page 11.

This article briefly talks about Columbia's work on the Hudson and their coach's reaction to it.

"Three Crews On Hudson/ Roughness Hampers Cornell and Penn, but Suits Columbia Well." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1916; Page 14.

This article briefly describes the practices the three crews on the Hudson participated in today.

"Three Cub Eights Rated Favorites/Syracuse, Washington, Cornell Head Field for Freshman Race on the Hudson/Ithacan Varsity Strong/Wray Expresses Hope to Give Bears a Close Battle in Talk at Luncheon." New York TIMES, June 18, 1936; Page 31, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the predictions for the freshmen race that year. It is pretty much established that Cornell and California are the big contenders for the Varsity race. The freshmen, however, it is widely believed will be between Washington and Syracuse. Both of those schools have won three freshmen races in recent years and they both look to be in good condition this year.

"Three-Mile Race Before Stewards/ Intercollegiate Rowing Authorities Unlikely to Shorten Poughkeepsie Event." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 3, 1915; Page S2.

This article discusses the meeting the Board of Stewards will be having to determine if the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be shortened to a three mile race, and it lists reasons why people would be for and against this change.

"Three-Mile Race Satisfies Cornell/ But Ithacans Will Carry Open Minds to Conference Here Over Rowing Problem." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 14, 1923; Page S3.

Cornell still wants the Poughkeepsie Regatta to remain at three miles, and they are hoping that will induce Wisconsin to participate again, however they will approach the Board of Stewards meeting with an open mind to other opinions.

"Three Washington Crews To Defend Hudson Titles." New York TIMES, February 13, 1938; Sec. 5, Page 6, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Varsity, Junior Varsity, and freshmen teams will all be journeying to Poughkeepsie to defend their two year running titles on the Hudson.

"Tigers Will Not Race On Hudson/ Dr. Spaeth Says the Poughkeepsie Regatta Borders on Commercialism." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 4, 1917; Page S2.

The announcement that Princeton will not be sending a crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta because their coach believes the event has become to commercialized and is too much like a professional sport.

"Time Trials For College Crews/ Coaches at Poughkeepsie Plan to Try Out Oarsmen Before Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1914; Page 10.

This article reveals that the coaches at Poughkeepsie are not thrilled with the work the crews have been doing on the Hudson. Although they attribute the setback to the rough water they have been having, they plan to work the crews hard this week despite the fact that the Regatta is quickly approaching.

"Time Trials For Crews On Hudson/ Columbia and Cornell in Fast Spins, but No Time is Announced." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 15, 1915; Page 11.

This article briefly describes the time trials that some of the crews participated in today.

"Time Trials Held By Princeton, Navy/ Tigers Cover Hudson Course in 20 Minutes – Columbia Oarsmen in Long Drill." New York TIMES, June 15, 1940; Page 22, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Princeton and Navy both held time trials today. Princeton ran the course in about 20 minutes, and Navy did not turn in a time. Both Princeton and Navy are both considered to be long shots at winning the Regatta this year. The rest of the crews were out doing varying practices throughout the day.

"To Build Stand For Race/ Seats for 5,000 Will Be Erected for Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1920; Page 22.

Ithaca is going to build a grandstand that can hold 5,000 spectators for the Intercollegiate Regatta. Meanwhile, the choppy water this afternoon prevented the crews from practicing in the afternoon, though some practiced in the morning.

"To Discuss Seneca Lake/ Poughkeepsie Regatta Committee Will Consider New Course." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 22, 1921; Page 20.

The Board of Stewards will be reviewing a proposal to hold the regatta on Seneca Lake.

"To Draw Lanes May 21 For Hudson Regatta/ Benson Makes Announcement at Inspection of Rowing Houses Near Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 8, 1929; Page 36.

This article announces that the lanes for the Poughkeepsie Regatta will be drawn on May 21st, the boathouses have all been inspected and approved, and M.I.T may enter the Regatta this year.

"To Invite Western Oarsmen/ Stanford, California, or Washington Crew to Row at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 4, 1913; Page 9.

This article in the New York Times reveals that the winning Western crew of the triangular rowing regatta will be invited to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"To Loan Observation Train." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1921; Page 86.

New Haven is going to be loaning their observation cars for use at the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"To Row In Junior Race/ Penn's 150-Pound Crew Will Contest in Poughkeepsie Event." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 10, 1922; Page 16.

Since there is not going to be a lightweight crew race Pennsylvania has received permission from the Board of Stewards to enter their lightweight crew in the Junior Varsity race.

"To Train For Regatta/ California Crew Leaves Princeton for Highlands Camp." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 6, 1921; Page 16.

California is on its way to the Hudson River to train for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"To Visit Marietta Site/ Rowing Stewards Then Will Decide on Place for 1950 Regatta." New York TIMES, December 10, 1949; Page 12, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Board of Stewards is considering the invitation from Marietta, Ohio to hold the yearly Regatta of the IRA at their site for 1950. The Regatta has been held on the Hudson River in Poughkeepsie since 1895. The offer made by the Marietta Rowing Committee is apparently very tempting, and the Board of Stewards plans on inspecting the site in person to see if a switch will be made.

"Track And Other Sports." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, April 7, 1911; Page 14.

This article mentions that the Syracuse crew team is busy raising the funds it needs to travel to Poughkeepsie this year. So far they have about one-fifth of the money that is required. The crew is also hard at practice preparing for the season.

"Train For Regatta Likely/ Railroad Officials Change Minds After Conference With Rowing Men." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 19, 1921; Page 27.

There will definitely be an observation train at the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and California and Navy will be participating in the Regatta.

"Trouble for Columbia's Crew/More Money and a New Coach are Needed-Neither is in Sight." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 10, 1900; Page 4.

This article discusses the trouble that Columbia has been in as of late. Their crew has lost their last three races, and they do not have a coach to lead them. On top of that, they must raise 2,000 dollars in three weeks if they have any hope of making the journey to Poughkeepsie for the Regatta.

"Twenty-second Intercollegiate Regatta on the Hudson River at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1915; Page 10.

This article lists the boating assignments of all the crews that rowed in the Poughkeepsie Regatta as well as the order in which they finished.

"Two College Races/ Cornell Freshmen and Pennsylvania Four the Victors/ Both Were Fine Contests/ Columbia Freshmen Were Second and Pennsylvania Third/ The Four-Oared Race Won in 11 Minutes 12 Seconds, and the Cornell Freshmen Covered the Two Miles in 9 Minutes 55 Seconds." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1899; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell won the freshmen race and Pennsylvania won the Varsity four race. A detailed description of each race is given, including the weather, the crowds, and the atmosphere. It also announces when the varsity race will be held the next day.

"Two Wisconsin Crews to Race." New York TIMES, May 28, 1941; Page 37, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Wisconsin will be sending two crews, their Varsity and freshmen, to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Varsity Crew Is the Only One Washington Will Send East." New York TIMES, April 22, 1932; Page 25, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington and Penn will only be sending their Varsity crews to race at Poughkeepsie due to cutting expenses.

" 'Varsity Crews Are Ready/ Yale, Harvard, and Cornell to Meet on the Hudson at Poughkeepsie This Afternoon/ Blue Favorite In Betting/ But on Form Shown in Practice Harvard Should Win, with Yale Second and Cornell Last – Vast Throng Will Witness the Contest." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1897; Page 5.

This article discusses the Varsity race including the fans that each crew has, the last practice they participated in, who the favorite is considered to be and why, and the condition that all the crews are in.

" 'Varsity Eights Picked and Crews in Quarters/ Harvard Oarsmen Have Shown Better Form in Practice/ Cornell's Strong Outfit/ Courtney Reported to Have Fastest Boat in Ten Years – Reports Encouraging from Other Colleges." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 10, 1906; Page 12.

This article discusses the teams that will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Cornell is again considered to be the favorite. All the colleges appear to be in great condition, however, with the exception of Columbia. Wisconsin in particular is considered to be a strong team and the western threat for the Regatta.

" 'Varsity Men Row To-day/ Four-Mile Struggle on the Hudson Between Cornell, Columbia, and Pennsylvania/ No End To Cornell's Luck/ Ithaca Men Again Draw the Position in the Centre of the River Where All the Winning Crews Have Rowed – Coaches Analyze Their Strokes." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 2, 1897; Page 5.

This article talks about the race that will be held today and compares each of the crews to give a prediction of who will win. The officials are also named and the rowing positions of the crews given.

"Varsity Oarsmen To Row 3 Miles/ Stewards Decide Definitely on Distance for Main Race in Poughkeepsie Regatta/ Columbia Alone Opposes/ Votes in Favor of Four Miles Against Representatives of Syracuse, Cornell, and Penn." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 16, 1923; Page 10.

The Poughkeepsie Regatta is once again going to be held at three miles. Columbia was the only school that voted for four miles. Syracuse was in favor of four miles but switched once they realized a deadlock would take place. It is still unknown whether Wisconsin will be participating in the Regatta.

"Varsity Oarsmen Win In Trial Spins/ Penn, Columbia and Syracuse Crews Beat Junior Boats – Coach Rice Makes Changes." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Page 18.

Pennsylvania, Columbia, and Syracuse varsities all raced informally against the junior varsity boats, and all varsities did a superior job to the junior boats. Coach Rice made some unexpected changes to his varsity lineup, and Washington got in two hard workouts in the morning and the afternoon.

"Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie Scheduled to Start at 7 P.M." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 29, 1921; Page 19.

The starting times of the Poughkeepsie races have been listed, with the big varsity race scheduled to start at 7:00 p.m.

"Varsity Race Will Remain At 3 Miles/ Poughkeepsie Stewards Expected to Vote for Shorter Distance at Thursday Meeting/ Big Regatta Proposed/ Penn Will Present Plan for Three Days of Rowing Modeled After English Henley." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 11, 1923; Page S4.

It is widely believed that the Board of Stewards will vote for a three mile Poughkeepsie Regatta, rather than a four. Other changes will also be proposed. Pennsylvania is planning on asking for a three day regatta, rather than just all in one day, and it will also be suggested by Columbia to have a much bigger event with races for 150 pound crews, teams of four and single sculls added to the mix.

"Varsity's Sprints Please Coach Rice/ Columbia Crews Cover Seventeen Miles in Morning and Afternoon Drills." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 13, 1923; Page 15.

Columbia has been engaging in some long hard practices lately, and their coach is pleased.

"Victory For Cornell/ Her 'Varsity Crew Beats Yale and Harvard in the Race at Poughkeepsie/ America At The Front/ Ignominious Defeat of the English Methods of Training in Yesterday's Race/ Yale Finishes Second And Harvard Last/ The Weather and Water Conditions Were Perfect, but Last Year's Record Was Not Equaled – A Vast Throng Witnessed the Contest/ Cornell, first; time, 20:34. Yale, second; time, 20:44. Harvard, third; time, 21:00." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1897; Page 1.

This article announces that Cornell has won the race, despite all of the predictions that they would come in last. A detailed description of the race is given, the reaction of the fans, and the comments of all the coaches.

Vidmer, Richards. "7 College Eights Set For Race Today/ Washington and Navy Quoted Even to Win Varsity Event on the Hudson/ Penn Eight A Dark Horse/ Syracuse Generally Regarded as Probably Winner of Contest Among Junior Oarsmen/ 50,000 To See Regatta/ 17 Crews to Compete in the Three Races – Quakers Picked for Freshmen Tilt." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1925; Page 11.

This article discusses the races that will be held on the Hudson that day, the expectations for all three, and the fear that everyone has of Washington.

Vidmer, Richards. "Crowd Sings Song Of Navy's Victory/ Chant of 'Anchors Aweigh' Echoes Over Hudson as Crew Rows to Triumph." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1925; Page 14.

This article celebrates the victory of the Navy eight that won the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and how others honored and celebrated their victory.

Vidmer, Richards. "Washington Eight Holds Final Spin/ Callow's Tone Pessimistic, but Eyes Twinkle as His Huskies End Their Training/ Navy Appears Contender/ Penn Oarsmen Work Smoothly at Poughkeepsie – Makeup of Crews Is Unchanged." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1925; Page S3.

This article details the last minute practices of Washington, as well as their coach's predictions for his crew. It also gives predictions for how other crews will fare as well.

"Von Bernuth Cannot Row/ Intercollegiate Association Rules Against Columbia on 4 Year Law." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 11, 1906; Page 9.

This article announces that Columbia's captain will not be allowed to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta due to the fact that he has already participated in college sports for four years.

"Waiting For Cornell/ Oarsmen at Poughkeepsie Anxious to See What Courtney's Men Can Do." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 16, 1896; Page 14.

Reveals that all of the crews on the Hudson are waiting for Cornell to arrive to see what kind of threat she will pose, as well as how each crew's coach thinks they are doing.

"Walling, Crippled Stroke, Improves/ Washington Crew Star Probably Will Be in Boat in Tomorrow's Regatta/ Leader Aids Westerners/ Yale Coach Follows Two Eights in Launch – Navy Oarsmen Impress – Columbia Has Two Drills." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1923; Page 16.

Washington's stroke is healing well from his infected knee and there is a good chance that he will be in the boat for the Regatta. There is a lot of interest in the Regatta this year, even the Yale coach has come down to observe crews during practice. Navy is not as good this year as they would look to be, and Washington has an injured member, but Columbia is looking great and nobody knows how Cornell and Pennsylvania will turn out.

"Want Princeton to Row/ Other College Oarsmen Urging Tigers to Take Up Sport." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, March 18, 1907; Page 8.

This article discusses how several colleges, especially Pennsylvania, are urging Princeton to begin their rowing program again and join the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The article goes on to mention how the Poughkeepsie Regatta has become one of the greatest aquatic events in the United States. Although it would take Princeton awhile to get up to a caliber where they would be in contention to win the race, the article mentions how there have always been two levels of competition at the regatta. There have always been three teams who are competing for the first place spot, and then another three who compete almost on a second tier level. Princeton, if they choose to join, will be competing with the second tier schools for awhile, until they have practiced enough to vie for the number one spot.

"Want Shorter Course/ Cornell May Advocate Three-Mile 'Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Nov. 16, 1914; Page 7.

This article briefly mentions how the stewards are considering shortening the length of the Poughkeepsie course.

"Wants Observation Train/ Poughkeepsie Mayor Makes Appeal to Officials of Railroad." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 2, 1920; Page 21.

The mayor of Poughkeepsie sent an appeal to the general traffic manager and the general superintendent of the New York Central Railroad asking for the observation train to be restored.

"Wants To Row On Hudson/ Washington University 'Varsity Crew Asks for Place in Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 7, 1913; Page 9.

This New York Times article announces that Washington University has requested that they be invited to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"War May Prevent College Regatta/ Rowing Stewards Meet Tomorrow to Discuss Effect on Poughkeepsie Classic." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 27, 1917.

Discusses the possible effect the war may have on the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Warm Weather Aids Crew Work/ Poughkeepsie Regatta Oarsmen Have Smooth Water For Good Day's Practice." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, June 21, 1910; Page 11.

This article discusses the hard week of practice that all of the crews had. The weather finally cooled down to warm temperatures, instead of hot, and all of the crews participated in time trials and racing starts. The coaches are hopeful that this weather will last through the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Washington and Navy Minor Race Victors/ Jayvee Event to Huskies, While Navy Takes Freshmen Race – Columbia Exceeds Hopes." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1927; Page 21.

This article provides a detailed description of the Jayvee and freshmen races, which Washington and Navy won respectively.

"Washington Coming East/ Huskies Will Row at Poughkeepsie and in Olympic Trials." New York TIMES, February 18, 1932; Page 26, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Washington Varsity will be making the trip to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and possibly the junior varsity and the freshmen as well. In addition, the Washington Varsity would also be entering the Olympic trials.

"Washington Crew Draws Lane One/ Columbia Gets Second and Penn Third for Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 26, 1926; Page 33.

This article lists what lanes each of the crews drew for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Washington Crew Expected to Defend Title in Poughkeepsie Regatta This Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 17, 1924; Page S1.

This article announces that Washington will most likely be defending their title at the Poughkeepsie Regatta, provided that the Washington athletic committee formally approves it.

"Washington Crew Has 5 Veterans/ Ulbrickson and Walling Again Will Be in Varsity Shell at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 29, 1925; Page 18.

This article discusses Washington, the defending champions of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and the likelihood of their winning the big race again.

"Washington Crew Hopeful Of Victory/ Bring Two Totem Poles Along from Far West as Token of Good Luck." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 8, 1913; Page S3.

This article in the New York Times talks about the arrival of Washington University on the Hudson River and their expectations to do very well in the Regatta.

"Washington Crew Invincible, Coach Rusty Callow Asserts." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 14, 1926; Page 27.

This article is the prediction of the Washington coach that this will be the best Washington crew that he has ever sent to the Regatta.

"Washington Crew Is Winner Over California; to Come East." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 22, 1923; Page S4.

Washington defeated California in their yearly race, so Washington will be traveling to Poughkeepsie to race in the regatta.

"Washington Crew May Come East." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 26, 1913; Page 12.

This article in the New York Times announces that the University of Washington will be competing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta if the crew can raise $1,000 for the cost of travel.

"Washington Crew May Lose Stroke/ Doctor Fears Wallings Infected Knee May Develop Blood Poisoning/ Freshmen Hope Of Coach/ Callow Becomes Pessimistic Concerning Chances of Varsity Following Loss." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1923; Page 15.

Washington's varsity crew may suffer the loss of their stroke due to an infected knee. Coach Callow had them out with the replacement stroke for a time trial however the boat was swamped by a passing passenger boat and the trial had to come to a halt. All the other schools had their crews out for practice as well.

"Washington Crew Prefers 3 Miles/ Oarsmen Vote on Question of Distance for Varsity Race at Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 27, 1923; Page 10.

The University of Washington has voted that they prefer the regatta to be a distance of three miles, although their vote will certainly not decide the matter.

"Washington Crew Rows Time Trial/ Varsity Unofficially Clocked in 14 M. 25 S. Over the Three-Mile Course/ Navy Eights Due Today/ Temperature of 100 Degrees Keeps Columbia and Cornell Off River Until Late Afternoon." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1923; Page 13.

Washington rowed an impressive time trial today, and Navy's crew boats arrived and were put in place at Washington's boathouse, the crews are expected to arrive tomorrow. Everyone else got in practices as well, although some crews didn't get out on the water until later in the day.

"Washington Crew Starts East." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 7, 1914; Page S2.

This article announces that Washington has started their journey east to the Hudson for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Washington Crew To Row On Hudson/ Stanford Eight, Although Defeated in West, Invited to Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 13, 1916; Page 15.

This article announces that Washington will be invited to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and they are planning to accept.

"Washington Crew's Acceptance." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 23, 1913; Page 11.

This article in the New York Times officially announces that Washington University has accepted the invitation to participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Washington Crews for Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 11, 1914; Page S3.

This article announces that Washington will be sending two eight oared crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Washington Crews Invited." New York TIMES, February 2, 1947; Section 5, Page 2, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the University of Washington was invited to send their Varsity, Junior Varsity, and freshmen crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Washington Crews Show Good Form/ Westerners Have Impressive First Practice on Hudson – Welcomed by Columbia/ Cornell Arrives Today/ Three Eights Prepare to Take Initial Workout – Navy is Due on Saturday." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 20, 1923; Page 15.

Washington arrived on the Hudson amid cheers from the other crews and impressed them all with their first practice. Cornell is expected to arrive in Poughkeepsie tomorrow.

"Washington for Hudson Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 17, 1914; Page 9.

This article announces that Washington will be sending a varsity squad to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Washington Gets No. 2 Varsity Lane/ Drawings Made for Races at Poughkeepsie on June 27 – Starting Times Set/ 18 Crews To See Action/ California Sending 3 Eights – Navy, Cornell, Syracuse to Carry East's Hopes." New York TIMES, June 3, 1938; Page 26, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the lanes were drawn for the three races at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Although each lane is fairly equal since the race was moved to the middle of the river, there is sometimes some rough water in the lanes closer to shore, so in the interest of fairness lanes are drawn. The drawing of the lanes confirmed that 18 crews will be rowing on the Hudson this year. Every school is sending three teams to the Regatta with the exception of Navy, who is sending two, and Wisconsin, who is only sending its Varsity team. The article also announced that the first race is set to begin at 3:45. This article has a small chart listing which schools drew which lanes for all three races.

"Washington, Penn Row Time Trials/ Huskies Cover Poughkeepsie Course Against Tide in 24 Minutes/ Piercy Has Pulled Tendon/ Columbia No. 4, However, Continues in Place – Leg Injury Forces Anderson Out of Navy Boat." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 25, 1927; Page 8.

This article discusses the attitudes in the camp now that the Regatta is approaching, as well as some time trials that some schools took. It also reports that Hart, who was laid out with a cold will be returning to the Washington varsity and will most likely be able to row in the Regatta.

"Washington Starts East/ Huskies, En Route to Poughkeepsie, to Work Out at Chicago." New York TIMES, June 12, 1936; Page 31, Col. 4; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Washington crews started out for Poughkeepsie today. The Junior varsity and the freshmen teams will be defending their titles, and the coach, Al Ulbrickson, believes the Varsity to be the fastest he's ever had. Washington will be stopping in Chicago along the way to work out before they reach Poughkeepsie.

"Washington Victor Again On The Hudson/ 50,000 See Wisconsin Make Sensational Drive and Finish Only Two Lengths Behind/ Cornell in Third Place/ Penn, Hope of the East, Is Fourth Over Poughkeepsie Three-Mile Course/ Columbia Oarsmen Last/ Follow Syracuse Across Line by a Length – Penn Wins Junior Varsity and Freshmen Races." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1924; Page 15.

This article announces that Washington has won the Varsity race on the Hudson for the second year in a row. A detailed account of the race is given, as well as the Junior Varsity and Freshmen races. A section of the article is dedicated to the Wisconsin crew team which raced brilliantly and was the big surprise of the day.

"Washington Will Not Row/ Pacific Coast Institution Will Not Have Crew on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 11, 1916; Page 13.

This article announces that Washington will not be rowing at the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year.

"Washington Will Send Two Crews to Hudson." New York TIMES, April 26, 1936; Sec. 5, Page 3, Col. 7; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington will definitely be sending its varsity and jayvee crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. They are also anxious to send their freshman team, seeing as they have won two years in a row, and they are currently trying to raise enough money to do so.

"Washington's Cubs May Row On Hudson/ Fans Offer to Provide Money for Freshmen – Other Boats Already Slated for Trip." New York TIMES, April 20, 1937; Page 32, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington officials may reconsider their decision to only send the Varsity and Jayvee crews to the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Washington enthusiasts petitioned the school to allow the public to raise the funds themselves and send all three defending champion crews to the Regatta.

"Weather And Water Ideal For The Races/ Great Colorful Crowd and Keen Contests Make Regatta One of Most Successful." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1926; Page 15.

This article discusses the ideal weather and water conditions of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as lively bunch of spectators.

Werden, Lincoln A., "Collapse of Remmer, Columbian, Adds Touch of Drama to Classic/ Only Seven Men in Shell Row Last Half Mile of Varsity Grind – Ideal Weather Draws Gay Crowd to Poughkeepsie Races." New York TIMES, June 26, 1941; Page 28, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article discusses the slight drama that happened during the Varsity race of the Regatta when one of the Columbia oarsmen collapsed going into the last mile of the race. The oarsman was Gene Remmer, and it was reported afterwards that his collapse was due to stomach cramps, and was going to be just fine. The loss of a man was costly to Columbia however, as they fell from fourth to last place. The weather conditions were beautiful, and many people were having picnics while waiting for the races to start. The observation train was once again a big seller for tickets, although there was not much cheering coming from the train, the reason being that the Western Crews once again dominated the Regatta.

Werden, Lincoln A., "Rowing Veterans Talk Of Old Days/ Reunions Draw Many to Hudson Regatta – Thousands Watch From Banks/ Ferry Delay Balks Some/ They Miss Observation Train and First Two Races When River Traffic Is Halted." New York TIMES, June 18, 1939; Section 5, Page 4, Col. 1; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts how the Regatta went this year for the fans. There were 20,000 spectators this year, and unlike last year, there was no rain to keep them away. Many of the spectators were rowing enthusiasts who have been coming to the Regatta for years. Many former rowers, as well as coaches from schools all over were on hand to watch the Regatta. The only hindrance was that the Coast Guard stopped the last ferry from crossing to the other bank, and 150 people with tickets for the observation train had to watch the race from the ferry. There are four charts on this page, as well as one picture.

Werden, Lincoln A., "Swamping of Jayvee Shells Mars Regatta for Poughkeepsie Crowd/ Washington, Syracuse, California, Columbia Go Under – Fans, Lacking Usual Gayety, Wait Five Hours for the Varsity Race." New York TIMES, June 19, 1940; Page 28, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts the events of the disastrous first Jayvee race. A race has never been called off after it has been allowed to go past the first 30 seconds, but many agree that it was the right thing to do. Even if Navy and Cornell had managed to finish the race it would have been a hollow victory for them without actually racing against the other crews.

Werden, Lincoln A. "Washington Cubs Win By A Length/ Defeat California in Late Rush With Navy, Cornell and Syracuse Trailing/ Jayvees Score Easily/ Huskies Lead Navy by 3 Lengths After Slow Starting Beat – Cornell in Third Place." New York TIMES, June 23, 1936; Page 29, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article recounts the events of the Freshmen and the Junior Varsity races. Washington gave excellent performances in both races. Both times the Huskies stroked low until the middle of the race, and then they turned up the pace to fly by their opponents to take the lead. California and Navy gave them a good fight all the way, but in the end the Washington crews prevailed. This marks the third consecutive win for the freshmen Huskies and the second consecutive win for the Junior Varsity.

Werden, Lincoln A. "Washington Victor In Two Crew Races/ Jayvees Triumph by 1 ½ Lengths and Freshman Eight by 3 on the Hudson." New York TIMES, June 19, 1935; Page 25, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Washington won both the Jayvee and the freshmen races. The article describes what happened in both races in detail. In the Jayvee race, the Huskies won with a time of 14:58 4-5, the third best time ever scored in the Jayvee race. The freshmen Washington coach praised his crew and claimed it was an even better crew than his 1934 winning eight, the sophomores who had won the Jayvee race today. There are two pictures and 3 charts on this page.

"Western Crew Coming." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 20, 1913; Page 9.

This article from the New York Times confirms that Washington's varsity eight will be coming to Poughkeepsie to compete in the Regatta.

"Western Crews May Come East/ Washington Now Certain and Stanford Is Hopeful of Entering Classic on Hudson." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jul. 23, 1916; Page E9.

This article announces that there is a very good chance that Washington and Stanford will be rowing on the Hudson next year for the Regatta, which is very positive because there were only four schools represented this year and it is causing spectators to lose interest.

"What Coaches Say Of Crews' Chances/ Columbia and California Rated Ahead of Others, but Some Foresee Open Race/ Majority Are Optimistic/ Only Syracuse and Navy Mentors See Little Hope of Victory in Varsity Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 19, 1928; Page 21.

This article posts the coaches opinions on their crew's chances for the regatta, and who they believe are the favorites. Most coaches were cautiously optimistic and many felt that the western crews were the favorites.

"What The Coaches Said." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1903; Page 2.

This article gives an account of some of the coach's reactions to the results of the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Where Will 'Tigers' Row?/ Speculation as to Their Racing at Poughkeepsie or New London." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 18, 1906; Page 10.

This article discusses the debate over which race Princeton will row in if they form a Varsity rowing squad. The two options would be to race in the Poughkeepsie Regatta, or to race on the Thames River with Harvard and Yale.

"Will Have Special Train/ Columbia Alumni and Students to See Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1922; Page 29.

Columbia alumni and students will be riding a special train that will take them to Poughkeepsie to watch the Regatta, and then bring them back home again.

"Will Not Break Training/ Coast Crew To Continue Practice for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 26, 1922; Page 27.

Despite the fact that Washington just won a victory they are not going to stop training because they are preparing for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Will Row On The Hudson/ The Poughkeepsie Course Chosen For The College Regatta/ Selection Was Made by the Unanimous Vote of Columbia, Harvard, Cornell, and University of Pennsylvania – Noteworthy Victory for the Representative of Columbia – Protection to Oarsmen Guaranteed by Law to Keep Course Clear." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 10, 1896; Page 2.

Now that the safety of the crews is guaranteed by law, the Hudson River has been officially chosen as the place where the Intercollegiate Regatta will be held.

"Winners of Varsity Races In Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1925; Page 14.

This is a chart that lists all of the past winners of the Poughkeepsie Regatta and the year that they won.

"Winners of Varsity Races In Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 27, 1922; Page 19.

The winners of all the Poughkeepsie Regattas are listed, as well as the times in which they rowed their winning race.

"Winners of Varsity Races In Intercollegiate Regattas." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1923; Page 13.

This is a chart that lists all the winners of the Varsity race of the Poughkeepsie Regatta since its beginning.

"Winners of Varsity Races In Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 29, 1926; Page 15.

This is a chart that lists the winner of the Intercollegiate Regatta for every year that it was held, as well as the time of the winning crew.

"Winners of Varsity Races In Intercollegiate Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 30, 1927; Page 21.

This is a chart that lists what team won the Poughkeepsie Regatta Varsity race each year it was held, and what their winning time was.

"Wisconsin Confirms Report It Will Row at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 4, 1924; Page S3.

This article confirms that Wisconsin will be rowing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin Crew Out of Poughkeepsie Race, But Trip to Olympic Tryouts is Approved." New York TIMES, May 5, 1932; Page 25, Col. 3; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article declares that Wisconsin is officially out of the Poughkeepsie Regatta for that year, and instead they would go to the Olympic Trials, provided that they could raise the funds for it. Wisconsin's coach felt that his inexperienced crew would have a better shot at the 2'000 meter Olympic Trials than at the 4 mile Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin Crew Outlook/ Coach O'Dea Believes the 'Varsity Boat Will Be Faster Than Last Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 24, 1903; Page 6.

This article discusses the Wisconsin crew team and their preparations for the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as their coach's outlook on how they will do.

"Wisconsin Crew Starts East To-day." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 26, 1901; Page 8.

This article announces that Wisconsin is all packed up and is ready to leave tomorrow at 5:10 in the morning.

"Wisconsin Crew To Row On Hudson/ Accepts Tentatively Invitation to Send Varsity to Poughkeepsie Regatta June 17/ Navy Will Not Compete/ Announced Definitely That Academy Will Not Be Represented – Princeton Is Doubtful." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 29, 1924; Page 14.

This article reveals that Wisconsin has tentatively agreed to send a varsity crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta. It also mentions that Navy will not be sending a crew, and it is still up in the air if Princeton will.

"Wisconsin Crews May Again Be Seen at Hudson Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Dec. 30, 1920; Page 18.

After six years there is once again a rowing program at Wisconsin, and with it comes the possibility of participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta again.

"Wisconsin Crews On Hudson/ The Westerners Look to be in Fine Condition, but Their Coach Talks Guardedly." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1900; Page 7.

This article announces that Wisconsin has arrived on the Hudson to begin practice for the Regatta and it reports on how prepared their coach feels they are.

"Wisconsin Drops Out Of Hudson Crew Race/ Announcement Made of Withdrawal Although Official Entry Has Been Listed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 21, 1927; Page 17.

This article reveals the surprise that Wisconsin's Athletic Department has withdrawn Wisconsin from the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin Eight Arrives At Camp/ Washington Also Takes Over Quarters – All Crews Hold Workouts on Hudson." New York TIMES, June 11, 1939; Sec. 5, Page 3, Col. 2; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that the Wisconsin Varsity and the Washington crews arrived on the Hudson today and immediately began practicing for the Regatta. The Washington Crews have had major changes in their lines after their defeat to California earlier in the season, and it is unknown what to expect from them. Tomorrow Cornell, Syracuse, and Navy are all expected to arrive on the Hudson with three crews each.

"Wisconsin Freshmen Withdraw." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 11, 1927; Page 17.

This article announces that Wisconsin's freshmen crew has withdrawn from the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin Likely to Pass Up Poughkeepsie and Concentrate on Olympic Rowing Tryouts." New York TIMES, April 23, 1932; Page 19, Col. 6; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Wisconsin may not send a crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year. They lost many strong men to graduation, and many of their varsity crew are sophomores, one of which had never rowed before this spring. The Wisconsin coach may choose to refrain from Poughkeepsie and concentrate on the Olympic trials instead.

"Wisconsin May Not Race/ Report That Western University Abandons Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Sep. 28, 1914; Page 11.

This article announces that there may be a possibility that Wisconsin will not participate in the Poughkeepsie Regatta next year. The Wisconsin rowing authorities think that the distance of the trip and the strain of the race is too much for the crew.

"Wisconsin Men Practice/ They Do Not Impress Experts at Poughkeepsie – Fast Time by Philadelphians." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1899; Page 8.

This article discusses the practice that the Wisconsin oarsmen held and people's reaction to it.

"Wisconsin Oarsmen to Row At Poughkeepsie This Year." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jan. 19, 1929; Page 17.

This article announces that Wisconsin will be returning to the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, which they did not compete in last year.

"Wisconsin Out of Race/ Coach Vail Will Not Enter Crew in Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, May 25, 1928; Page 23.

This article states that Wisconsin will not be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin Rows Today/ May Race on Hudson if Eight Does Well Against Washington." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 18, 1927; Page 12.

This article reveals that Washington, on their way to the Hudson for the Regatta, will be stopping to race Wisconsin on the way, and if Wisconsin makes a good showing their coach may make a last minute effort to enter Wisconsin into the Regatta.

"Wisconsin Sends Entry To Regatta/ Official Acceptance of Invitation to Row in Hudson Classic Is Received." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 14, 1925; Page 10.

This article reveals that Wisconsin has accepted their invitation to the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and M.I.T. has not.

"Wisconsin to Row at Poughkeepsie."/ ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 25, 1902; Page 6.

This article announces that Wisconsin will be rowing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin to Row at Poughkeepsie." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Mar. 24, 1899; Page 4.

This article reveals that Wisconsin will be rowing in the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin to Row Syracuse." New York TIMES, May 12, 1940; Section 5, Page 5, Col. 5; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This article announces that Wisconsin will be participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta this year, and as last year, they will be stopping at Syracuse to race against them on their way to Poughkeepsie.

"Wisconsin To Send a Freshmen Eight/ To Enter First-Year Crew at Poughkeepsie, Besides Varsity Boat." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Apr. 25, 1925; Page 12.

This article announces that Wisconsin will be sending a Varsity as well as a Freshmen crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Wisconsin's Heavy Crew/ Capt. Pollock's Men Will Average 170 Pounds for Poughkeepsie Regatta." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, April 23, 1912; Page 14.

This article announces that Wisconsin will be sending a crew to the Poughkeepsie Regatta to row in the Varsity race. The crew weight average is 179 pounds and is the heaviest crew that Wisconsin has sent to the Regatta. While it is expected that they will lose weight, they will most likely only go down to an average of 170 pounds. The heaviest crew last year at the Regatta was Pennsylvania who averaged 167 pounds.

"Wisconsin's Rowing Plans/ General Revival of Sport Throughout West in Prospect." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Feb. 18, 1917; Page S3.

Announces Wisconsin will send a crew to the Hudson next year now that the race is three miles long, the status of the other western crews is uncertain.

"Work Of College Crews/ Pennsylvania's Four Rows at Fast Trial at Poughkeepsie/ Light Practice For Cornell/ Drawings for Tuesday's Regatta Announced – Yale and Harvard Make Good Time at New London." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1904; Page 7.

This article discusses the work the crews participating in the Regatta are doing on the river in preparation. Pennsylvania's time trial is mentioned, as well as the fact that Georgetown and Cornell may have to withdraw from the four-oared race.

"Work of College Crews/ Preparations for the Contests at Poughkeepsie and New London/ Rough Water On The Hudson/ Reported the Columbia Freshmen Beat the Wisconsin Crew in an Impromptu Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1899; Page 8.

This article describes the activities that each of the crews engaged in on the very rough waters of the Hudson. It also describes a quick impromptu race that occurred between Columbia and Wisconsin when the two crews drew alongside one another during their respective practices.

"Work Of The College Crews/ Columbia Rowing Steady – New Shells for Harvard and 'Pennsy.' " ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 12, 1896; Page 3.

This article describes Pennsylvania and Columbia practicing on the Hudson for the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

"Work Of The College Crews/ Pennsylvania Does Well at Poughkeepsie – Captain Coffin of Cornell III." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1904; Page 5.

This article discusses what the practice routines of the colleges participating in the Poughkeepsie Regatta have been for the past few days.

"Yale at Poughkeepsie/ Men Present a Fine Appearance, and the 'Varsity Crew Outweigh Cornell's or Harvard's/ The Boating Colony At Rest/ Statistics Showing All that Is Known of the Three Big Crews – How and When the Races Will Be Rowed." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 21, 1897; Page 5.

This article announces that Yale has arrived on the Hudson. It also gives updates on the crews, how they are performing, how Yale's arrival has changed the experts' statistics, and a brief program for the Regatta.

"The Yale Freshmen Win/ Harvard a Length Behind at Poughkeepsie, and Cornell Nearly Another Length in the Rear/ A Fine Race Over Good Water/ Harvard First to Catch at the Start – The Excellent Work of Her Crew a Great Surprise – The Race Postponed Until Seven O'clock/ Yale, first; time, 9:19 1-2. Harvard, second; time, 9:26 1-2. Cornell, third; time, 9:29 1-2." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 24, 1897; Page 5.

This article announces that Yale won the freshmen race. A detailed description of the race is given, including the activities before the race, as well as the race itself.

"Yale Luck Asserts Itself/ The Blue Draws the Favorite Position for To-Day's Race." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 23, 1897; Page 3.

This article announces what lanes the crews drew for the race today.

"Yale Men On The Hudson/ Their Good Form Gives Promise of a Great Race at Poughkeepsie on Friday/ Victors Will Have To Work/ "Bob" Cook Displays the New Stroke He Learned in England – Harvard Confident and on Form Should Win – Cornell Crew Looks Light." ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York TIMES, Jun. 22, 1897; Page 3.

This article describes the Yale crew, how they have been performing in practices and the probability of their winning. It also briefly mentions their rivals, the Cornell and Harvard crews, and compares the Yale crew to them.

Websites

Griffin, John. 2004. Poughkeepsie Regatta brought sports acclaim. Poughkeepsie Journal, August 22. http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/hudson/stories/mf300.shtml (accessed June 8, 2005).

This article briefly outlines the history of the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and its importance to the area and the sport of rowing. It also briefly compares the excitement and prestige of the sport when it was held in Poughkeepsie to where it is held now.

Taylor, Brad. 2003. The Many Threads to Tradition's Tapestry. University of Wisconsin Crew Alumni.

This article relates a story that was told at a University of Wisconsin Annual Men's Crew Banquet. It briefly outlines the beginnings of Wisconsin rowing and discusses the Poughkeepsie Regatta and its importance to the school. As proof of the importance of the Poughkeepsie Regatta to the University of Wisconsin, a letter by D. Hayes Murphy, former Crew Commodore in the year 1900, is included. In the letter D. Hayes Murphy recounts how it was so important to the university that they send their Freshman Crew with the Varsity to the Poughkeepsie Regatta that the faculty and the Dean told Mr. Murphy, then a student, that it was more important for him to concentrate solely on raising enough money to send both teams than to pass his two law finals, and he would still receive his diploma based on his class rank. This article is an excellent example of how important the Poughkeepsie Regatta was to schools and the lengths they would go to in order to attend.

University of Washington. 2005. Husky Crew: 1920-1929. Washington Rowing Foundation. http://www.huskycrew.com/1920.htm (accessed June 8, 2005).

This website gives a detailed history of the Washington Husky Men's Crew teams from the years 1920-1929. Washington would become a powerhouse in the rowing world, and their trips to the Poughkeepsie Regatta are related throughout the website. Almost every year a play by play account of the end of the races at the Poughkeepsie Regatta are retold. Many of the finishes, especially the Varsity, were extremely close, tense, and exciting. There is a photo of the team at Poughkeepsie under 1922. Scattered throughout the history can be found stories of unique events that happened at the Poughkeepsie Regatta, such as when the varsity coxswain signaled his crew to pick up the speed near the finish of a close race with Navy with a piece of red flag, and became the first west coast crew team to win the IRA. Under 1923 there's a photo of the varsity team, a piece of flag that was used by the varsity coxswain to signal his crew to "give her all you got", the IRA varsity cup, and a general shot of the varsity race. Also mentioned is the risk of rowing on the Hudson, which was much polluted at the time, demonstrated by some rowers falling ill before the race. Also mentioned is how important it was to Washington to go to the Poughkeepsie Regatta, their season was not complete without it. 1926 photo of the Varsity at the Poughkeepsie Regatta and a varsity race shot when there is only a half mile to go. 1927 photo of the JV winning their race at Poughkeepsie. 1928 photo of where the crew stayed that year, at the Aberdeen-on-the-Hudson Mansion, and a picture of the freshman crew on the Hudson.

University of Washington. 2005. Husky Crew: 1940-1949. Washington Rowing Foundation.

This website gives a detailed history of the Washington Husky Men's Crew teams from the years 1940-1949. As before there are accounts of the team's races in Poughkeepsie for every year that they were there. Scattered throughout are stories of unusual occurrences at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. An example is a story from 1940 when the JV race was postponed until after the Varsity race, which was also delayed, so the JV's ended up racing in pitch black dark. The spectators could not see the boats, and the teams could not see each other. Many crews ended up finishing the race lanes over from where they started. The only reason the judges knew who won was because the Washington JV crew finished 8 lengths ahead of any other boat. There is a 1940 photo of the Washington boathouse on the Hudson, and a crew preparing to launch on the Hudson. Also mentioned is when the IRA varsity race was shortened to a 3 mile race for the second time, this time for good, so the 1941 Washington Varsity crew was the last team to win the four mile collegiate IRA race. There is a photo of the 1941 Varsity crew winning the last 4 mile IRA race. There is also a photo of the JV race on the Hudson. Also mentioned throughout these pages are play by play accounts of almost all the finishes at the Poughkeepsie races. There is a 1948 photo of the Varsity winning at Poughkeepsie. Briefly mentioned is the last Regatta ever held in Poughkeepsie and why it was moved. Also the 1949 JV race which was again postponed and held during a storm where there was lightening flashing and a bolt hit the bridge a half mile from the finish during the race.

University of Wisconsin. Season Results: Eastern Sprints: DNP IRA: 7. University of Wisconsin Rowing History.

This website displays the season results for the University of Wisconsin for the year 1946-1947. This includes their results at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. These WebPages also discuss briefly why the Poughkeepsie Regatta was shortened from a 4 mile course to a 3 mile course in the years after the War, as well as other changes that happened because of the World War. Also discussed is the pressure that the teams felt to succeed, and the mind games that were played on teams prior to the race. An example that is related is a time that the Wisconsin team was psyched out before the race began. There are also photos of the Wisconsin team at the Poughkeepsie Regatta, and other photos on this site including the R.R Bridge when a race is underway, Poughkeepsie boathouses, and a couple race shots.

University of Wisconsin. Season Results: IRA: 1898 – 1899. University of Wisconsin Rowing History.

The season results for the University of Wisconsin at the IRA for the years 1898 to 1899. The website very briefly describes what happened at the Regatta. The year 1899 is very important to Wisconsin because of their famous "Haymaker Crew" which almost won the Regatta that year, coming in second to Pennsylvania. The crew members and what positions they rowed are also listed. There is a photograph of the crew members as well as a drawing of the Poughkeepsie Course diagram taken from a Poughkeepsie Regatta program.

Press Conferences

Press Conference, Held at Dutton Lumber Company Wharf, Poughkeepsie NY, June 20, 1938; Press Conference #467; Volume 11-12, 1938; Complete Presidential Press Conferences; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

The President is asked if he will be going to the Poughkeepsie Regatta and he replies that he will try very hard to make it. His boat, the Potomac, will be waiting for him, however if he doesn't make it his captain has instructions to take any Navy crew members family and friends onto the boat to watch the race instead.

Press Conference, Held in the study of the President's home, Hyde Park NY, June 21, 1938; Press Conference #468; Volume 11-12, 1938; Complete Presidential Press Conferences; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

The President is asked if he's going to attend the Regatta and he replies that he's going to try his absolute best to get there in time. The times that the races will be held at are also briefly discussed.

Press Conference, Held in the Executive Offices of the White House, June 24, 1938; Press Conference #469; Volume 11-12, 1938; Complete Presidential Press Conferences; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

The President explains what his plans are for the next two days and mentions his plan to go to Poughkeepsie to see the crew races.

Press Conference, Held in the study of the President's home, Hyde Park NY, June 28, 1938; Press Conference #470; Volume 11-12, 1938; Complete Presidential Press Conferences; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

The President expresses his disappointment at not being able to go see the Poughkeepsie Regatta.

Journals

Lange, Allynne. 1997. Rowing on the Hudson River. Focs'le News 18(1). Hudson River Maritime Museum. http://www.ulster.net/~hrmm/museum/focsle/v18n1/exhibit.html (accessed June 8, 2005).

This article relates a brief history of all types of rowing on the Hudson River focusing on the professional rowing that began Poughkeepsie's rowing history. The second part of the article gives a quick basic history of the College Rowing chapter of the Hudson River.

Letters

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, May 22, 1934; Folder: 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from Peter H. Troy, the chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, to the President, asking for a donation to help the committee support the Poughkeepsie Regatta. The letter announces which colleges will be racing in this year's regatta. The letter also describes what the money will be used for. This year the money will be used to repair the docks and floats that were damaged by the winter ice on the river. The letter also adds the incentive that any contributors to the Regatta fund this year will receive their choice of tickets on the observation train for the race.

Letter, President Roosevelt's Secretary to Peter H. Troy, June 19, 1934; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter from the President's secretary announces the enclosed check of $10.00 towards the Regatta fund.

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Franklin D. Roosevelt; May 20, 1935; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, to the President, asking for a donation to help the committee support the Poughkeepsie Regatta. This letter explains that the committee has to raise $5,000 for this year's regatta. $3,000 of the money will be used to pay the board of stewards. The rest of the money is needed to remodel and re-equip the California boathouse so that the crew members may live in it as well as store their boats.

Letter, President Roosevelt's Secretary to Peter H. Troy, June 5, 1935; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter from the President's secretary announces the enclosed check of $10.00 towards the Regatta fund.

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Franklin D. Roosevelt; May 20, 1936; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter from Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, to the President announces the schedule for this year's Poughkeepsie Regatta. It also explains that because of the damage from the winter, the committee will need to raise $5,000, and the letter asks for donations.

Letter, Maxwell Stevenson to President Roosevelt, June 10, 1936; Folder 3615 Intercollegiate Rowing Association; PPF 3610-3649; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is to President Roosevelt from Maxwell Stevenson, chairman of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association. It is an invitation for the President to watch the Poughkeepsie Regatta from the referee's boat, the "Tara."

Letter, President Roosevelt to Maxwell Stevenson, June 16, 1936; Folder 3615 Intercollegiate Rowing Association; PPF 3610-3649; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from President Roosevelt to Maxwell Stevenson. It is a thank you note for the President's invitation to watch the Poughkeepsie Regatta from aboard the referee's boat. Unfortunately the President will be unable to attend the Regatta this year.

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Franklin D. Roosevelt; December 29, 1937; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter from Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, to the President thanks him for his contribution. The letter also announces what the budget will be for next year. There is also a statement included with the letter listing the receipts and the disbursements of the funds for that year's regatta. The statement also lists all the contributors to the regatta fund, and how much each contributor gave.

Letter, President Roosevelt's Secretary to Peter H. Troy; July 13, 1937; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This note from the President's secretary apologizes for the lateness of the enclosed $10.00 check to the Regatta fund.

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, June 2, 1938; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, to the President, and it is asking for a contribution to the Regatta fund because the $5,000 allotted for the Regatta this year is not enough to cover expenses and they need to raise more money. Sent along with the letter is a statement that shows what they have spent money on so far, and what they still need to do, which makes it necessary to raise more money. The money that will be collected will be used for cots, mattresses, floats, repairs to boathouses, and a dock needs to be built.

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, May 24, 1939; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, to the President. This letter announces that the chairman is looking forward to 1940 where they are sure there will be an increase in the number of colleges participating in the Regatta. This will also, of course, mean that the committee has to raise more money. Included with the letter is a statement that shows the list of contributors, how much each person or group donated, as well as the expenditures and receipts for the year.

Letter, Maxwell Stevenson to President Roosevelt, June 4, 1940; Folder 3615 Intercollegiate Rowing Association; PPF 3610-3649; Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from Maxwell Stevenson, chairman of the Intercollegiate Rowing Association, to President Roosevelt. It is an invitation for the President to watch the Poughkeepsie Regatta from aboard the referee's boat, the "Tara."

Letter, President Roosevelt's Secretary to Peter H. Troy, June 19, 1939; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from the President's Secretary to Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, thanking him for his letter, and included with the note is a $10 check to go to the Regatta fund.

Letter, President Roosevelt's Secretary to Peter H. Troy, July 5, 1940; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from the President's Secretary to Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee, with a $10 check to go towards the Regatta fund.

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Roosevelt, July 7, 1940; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee thanking the President's secretary for the President's donation to the Regatta.

Letter, Peter H. Troy to President Roosevelt, August 16, 1940; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is from Peter H. Troy, chairman of the Intercollegiate Regatta Committee to President Roosevelt, announcing the enclosure of the IRA statement from 1940 showing the expenditures, contributors, and receipts for the year.

Letter, President Roosevelt's Secretary to Peter H. Troy, August 24, 1940; Folder 1666 Intercollegiate Regatta Committee (Poughkeepsie); PPF 1662-1674 (1933-38); Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.

This letter is a note from President Roosevelt's secretary to Peter H. Troy, thanking him for the IRA statement.

Collections

DC1999.4.1 - .14, Len & Elaine Bard Gift; Dutchess County Historical Society, Poughkeepsie, New York.

This collection contains two different programs from the Poughkeepsie Regatta, as well as three photographs relating to the Regatta as well.